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Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in an Age of Diminished Expectations: Economic Sense and Nonsense in the Age of Diminished Expectations (Norton Paperback)
Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in an Age of Diminished Expectations: Economic Sense and Nonsense in the Age of Diminished Expectations (Norton Paperback)
by Paul Krugman
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but lacks rigour., 24 Aug. 2005
I was assigned this book as prep reading for university. Whilst i found it highly informative as to the history of macroeconomic theory and policy in a general sense, the analysis of the various models was so lacking in rigour (diagramatic or mathematic) that Krugman failed to convince me of the failings of any of the systems proposed by the academics. That said, the book is well written (for an economics book extremely well written) and presents the generalities clearly and with a sense of humour. In short if you are generally interested in economics then its worth reading, if your of a more academic persausion you may well be disappointed.


Globalization and Its Discontents
Globalization and Its Discontents
by Joseph Stiglitz
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.49

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent detail, too repetitive., 14 Aug. 2005
Stiglitz is clearly a first rate economist, the arguments he makes in his book are by no means watertight, but I found most of them to be very convincing. In particular his analyses of the Asian financial crisis, and the contrasting methods of communist-to-capitalist transition are excellent, he clearly explains any jargon and highlights some key areas that are often dismissed in other non-academic economics discussions.Also Stiglitz provides lots of helpful references to other works so if you feel like digging deeper in one particular area you can.
On the other hand the book suffers from an alarming amount of repetition, many paragraphs are more or less verbatim clones of previous ones and several of the chapters are clearly redundant. That said I don't know of another book that deals with the same area with such class and as it is so short the repetition isn't too much of a problem. In short it is well worth the read, Globalization is the most important issue facing us today (try saving the environment without solving it first, ain't gonna happen), we all need to have an informed opinion.


Tamerlane: Sword of Islam, Conqueror of the World
Tamerlane: Sword of Islam, Conqueror of the World
by Justin Marozzi
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction (3.5*), 11 April 2005
This is an interesting book about a fascinating and under-exposed topic. The tale of Temur is indeed great and is on a comparable level to Napolean, Alexander etc In addition to this Marozzi generaly writes well, although the prose is occasionaly a little stop-go. Just a few gripes which prevented the 4th star. Firstly much of the historiography (sorry if thats not the right word) is quite superficial, there is little analytical depth. Secondly there is too much desciption of minute architectural detail, personally i am not that interested in the exact decoration of every single one of the palaces/monuments/tmples construted by Temur, then again others may find this fascinating. Lastly Marozzi often weaves contemporary narrative and information concerning his experiences of the area and whilst this is sometimes interesting, broadly speaking it detracts from the history.


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