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Young Adult Book Reviewers


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Initial post: 22 Aug 2012 23:41:42 BDT
wanitajump says:
Im just curious if anyone has suggestions for YA's who like to read and review books - Would love to hear some suggestions on great reviewers :)

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2013 17:05:54 GMT
Lady says:
Hello, I have just finished an excellent book. I am not normally a fan of this Genre however it was recommended to me from a friend and I thought it was amazing. I am 22 and loved it but I think it is , its call Scripted by Dayna Carroll. Its set in the future and follows a 17 year old girl, in England. England has changed and 'life' is no longer as it is today but is like big brother completely controlled and 'scripted' it tackles issues of friends, family, appearance and a romance throughout with lots of action. I think it would be great for a young girl, and I have contacted the author via Twitter and she is only 18 herself which made me like it more. There is also a free sample which is nice as its a rather pricey book.

Posted on 14 Jan 2013 17:29:20 GMT
The Truth says:
My advice would just be to write as much and as often as you can. I don't really review books so can't offer much more advice than that, I'm afraid.

Personally, I would also try and keep reviews easy to read and not too long. And try and wrote an intriguing headline to draw readers towards your review and make them pick it over others.

Posted on 15 Jan 2013 18:32:39 GMT
J. Forbes says:
What exactly is the purpose of a "Young adult" book?

Are today's young adults incapable of appreciating a real book?

Or are they possessed of some insights that are denied "old" adults, so that such books can only be appreciated by the super-perceptive young?

I suspect that these books are aimed at people with little education and very short attention spans. There is nothing new under the sun - Mills and Boon have been aiming at a similar market for years, but they have had the sense not to focus on a narrow market.

Posted on 15 Jan 2013 19:39:30 GMT
Bob says:
What exactly is the purpose of a "Young adult" book?

For us OAPs that like a nice easy read if we can avoid the junk out there.

Posted on 16 Jan 2013 08:26:51 GMT
The Truth says:
I read the post as young adults who review books as opposed to a genre aimed at older teens and 20 somethings.

Posted on 16 Jan 2013 09:39:50 GMT
It is a genre designed to sell more books of course. For books that adults would see as "embarassing" ; but which can be sold to less discerning readers.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 09:55:14 GMT
Damaskcat says:
I think there's a reviewer called something like 'Teensreadtoo' who writes, from what I remember, some very good reviews.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 09:58:19 GMT
Damaskcat says:
Young Adult books often have something of interest for older readers too. Authors such as K M Peyton for example write for the YA market as do Cora Harrison, Alan Garner, Leon Garfield. It used to be called fiction for teenagers. There is a lot of cross over between fiction marketed as YA and ordinary fiction and I don't consider anything anyone reads as 'embarrassing'.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 10:01:45 GMT
Damaskcat says:
I once read a totally fascinating book about M&B. It was based on research carried out into who exactly read the typical M&B romance and the results were surprising. Readers were aged between about 10 and 90 and were both men and women and all educational attainments. They aren't just for the thick people with short attention spans. When I was studying - way back in my early 20s - I used to read them because they enabled me to wind down after spending most of my time reading very much more complex stuff for my course.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 13:51:20 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Jan 2013 13:52:10 GMT
I agree with you wholeheartedly here Damaskcat. Also, it seems fairly obvious to me that YA fiction is likely to have the major protagonists falling with a certain age bracket. The Catcher in the Rye for example, was very much targetted at YA - and is also a book which resonates for adult readers. YA neither means nor does not mean work of lesser value than books written for adults. Like all genres there may be better pieces and less well written pieces of writing within that genre.

As one of the major reasons people read novels is for recognition and identification it seems perfectly sensible that a beautifully written book about a group of 90 year olds facing their sooner rather than later demise might be of less interest to a 14 year old, than a beautifully written book about teenagers (Catcher) might be to a 90 year old, as the 90 year old has of course BEEN 14.

So I really don't agree with J Forbes comment:

"Are today's young adults incapable of appreciating a real book?

Or are they possessed of some insights that are denied "old" adults, so that such books can only be appreciated by the super-perceptive young?

I suspect that these books are aimed at people with little education and very short attention spans".

which i think is provocative and insulting

Posted on 16 Jan 2013 14:13:49 GMT
Bob says:
They seem to leave out "the rude bits" which seems so essential to todays novels often without the plot needing it.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 14:34:36 GMT
Damaskcat says:
I think your example of The Catcher in the Rye shows that a good story can be read by anyone of any age.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 16:45:53 GMT
But that was written many decades before Marketing/Publishing people came up with the idea of "Young Adult" fiction to sell the rubbish they couldn't shift before.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 17:02:24 GMT
Puffin, which was established many moons ago, for children and young adult books. Ditto book awards like Carnegie. I can certainly recall belonging to a book club and getting books which were targetted to me. The title 'Young Adult' may not have been invented, but that is exactly what the concept was - books for teenagers.

In fact (I may be wrong about this) but I'm pretty sure Catcher was a Puffin book

And really, Young Adult is not a category for 'rubbish' any more than any other genre is a category for rubbish. You get good writing and bad writing in all areas.

I read quite a lot of Young Adult books, though I am very far away from being a young adult. If writing is good (IMO) I'm interested.

For example - my most recent YA read, which is extremely provocative

Not the End of the World

A book which is both well-written and extremely thought provoking

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jan 2013 17:10:50 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Jan 2013 17:12:13 GMT
Damaskcat says:
I don't think that's correct. There is some very good YA fiction out there. I make no secret of reading some of it and I'm more than 40 years older than the target audience.

Posted on 16 Jan 2013 21:07:02 GMT
J. Forbes says:
I read Catcher at school in the early 60s. I don't think it was a Puffin. Puffins were aimed at children, not older teenagers.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jan 2013 08:47:32 GMT
No doubt there is some good stuff, but the concept is a recent one, invented by Marketing to shift more books.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jan 2013 10:42:32 GMT
Damaskcat says:
Well if you want to be cynical that's up to you. YA has replaced teenage that's all.

Posted on 17 Jan 2013 13:58:07 GMT
J. Forbes says:
It's the marketing people who are cynical, not KJ. The marketing people have identified a category and given it a euphemistic name to make it appeal more to the members of it - older teenagers.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jan 2013 14:46:24 GMT
Damaskcat says:
But then if people don't like the books they won't continue to buy them!

Posted on 18 Jan 2013 05:08:29 GMT
I don't see anything wrong with labelling certain books as YA, or teen for that matter. There has been a great increase in the amount of young people reading and I believe that is a direct result of the fact that there is now a great range of fiction available. When I was at school the only modern fiction aimed at my age group was a kind of junior chick lit, eg "Sweet Valley High" I'm not knocking these books as I still read and enjoy romantic comedy but it can get boring after a while. As a result of this, many of my friends and I ended up reading books which were not really suitable for 12 and 13 year olds, ie too much sex and violence. When my 12 year old is reading a book labelled YA I can be reassured that it is suitable for her. I have to admit to reading and enjoying many of these myself.
I thoroughly agree with Damaskcat about Mills and Boon. The authors writing these have never claimed to be writing Booker prize material but that does not mean that their work is inferior. In fact I find it much more enjoyable and always like to have a couple of them at hand for those times that I crave sheer escapism. Many of my favourite suspense authors started their careers with Mills and Boon or Silhouette. I often find that those critics who are most vocal about this genre have never actually read one and I suspect the same is true of YA fiction.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jan 2013 08:08:01 GMT
Damaskcat says:
Well said kittycat :-)

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jan 2013 09:06:19 GMT
"There has been a great increase in the amount of young people reading.."

Exactly what the Marketing people wanted, when they dreamed this idea up.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jan 2013 09:23:00 GMT
In which case, this has been a valuable piece of marketing, and, rarely, I find myself in the position of giving the marketers a thumbs up.

But, KJ I really don't think this is a new thing. As DamasKcat, I think, said earlier, the original marketing was aimed at teenagers. I remember, as I said, being targetted as a teen by books and a book club aimed at us. All that has changed is the appellation of title.

What has been addressed was a decline in reading, very much linked with the rise of stuff which wasn't around when I was in that market - eg everything which has come, for good and ill, with the internet
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