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Amazon based scams.


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Initial post: 2 Jul 2012 13:02:53 BDT
The Truth says:
Found these on Yahoo:

"The public need to be aware of yet another Amazon scam in circulation. It is a voucher that advertises a 10 voucher for Amazon. However, once you sign up to the voucher and give your personal details to the company 29 will be debited from your account each month and will be described as an administration fee."
Shan, April 2012

"I received an official looking email from a company pretending to be Amazon to say the order I had placed had been cancelled. The email included a new order number and a link to what I thought was Amazon. I clicked on this and it directed me to the website of a Canadian pharmaceutical company selling drugs."
Barry, February 2012

Keep your guard up Amazonians!

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Jul 2012 13:42:48 BDT
Damaskcat says:
Anyone getting any such e-mails should also forward them to Amazon.

Posted on 2 Jul 2012 14:10:08 BDT
Quiverbow says:
"It is a voucher that advertises a 10 voucher for Amazon. However, once you sign up to the voucher and give your personal details to the company 29 will be debited from your account each month and will be described as an administration fee."

And people actually fall for these things?

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Jul 2012 06:32:38 BDT
Last edited by the author on 3 Jul 2012 08:29:54 BDT
Molly Brown says:
http://www.soca.gov.uk/protecting-yourself/protecting-the-public

Reporting fraud

Please note:

*SOCA is unable to take reports of crime from members of the public. If you are a victim of crime you should report it to your local police force.
*The City of London Police is the UK's lead force for fraud. You can report fraud directly to them and get advice on how to protect yourself. Their site is linked below.
*The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) also have a dedicated response to fraud and economic crime. There's a link to their site below.
*If you are a victim of card fraud, you should report it to your bank or card company straightaway.

There is the ActionFraud link on the above site, which deals with Fraud and Internet Crime. You can report the incident to them, and obviously as Damaskat says, I would imagine that Amazon would like to know too.

http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

There is also this one for anyone with a Paypal account:

Beware of fake "confirm PayPal account" emails

Fraudsters have sent legitimate looking PayPal themed emails, in an attempt to trick users into entering their personal information
[28 June 2012]

Beware of fake "confirm PayPal account" emails
A well-crafted email supposedly coming from PayPal is trying to trick customers of the popular e-payment giant to follow a link embedded in it. The link contained within the fake email takes those users to a reproduced PayPal phishing site. Action Fraud is reminding everyone to be wary of emails saying they come from financial service providers like PayPal, and to never give out personal information without checking who it is really going to.

The scam email reads:

"Dear PayPal Costumer, It has come to our attention that your PayPal account information needs to be updated as part of our continuing commitment to protect your account and to reduce the instance of fraud on our website," it says in the email.

"If you could please take 5-10 minutes out of your online experience and update your personal records you will not run into any future problems with the online service. However, failure to update your records will result in account suspension. Please update your records before June 12, 2012. Once you have updated your account records, your PayPal account activity will not be interrupted and will continue as normal."

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 21:53:12 BDT
Penop says:
I blame companies such as Paypal as much as the scammers! This week, Paypal insisted I gave new credit card details (even though I use (have used for years) my bank account to debited my purchases). Their request was suspicious and I still don't undersatand why they needed new credit card data. Paypal refused to continue my arrangement with them without these other details. Is Paypal a scammer? Who knows?

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Jul 2012 23:45:32 BDT
Lark says:
I saw both of these actually.

I didnt follow any links, I generally dont, and thought it was a scam when my supposedly cancelled deliveries arrived in the mail.

Posted on 18 Feb 2014 20:17:56 GMT
Last edited by the author on 18 Feb 2014 20:19:22 GMT
Matthew66 says:
I ordered two pillows from Amazon Local .. now defunct?
I was sent an order summary and the payment was taken. That was 20th Jan. I contact Amazon and they say I ordered a voucher? When I check my emails there is a REDEEM VOUCHER button. Fair enough. But, I was misled into thinking that I ordered the items on the order summary, so why would I redeem a voucher?
When I contacted Amazon they were courtious enough and put me through to Amazon Local because they are a 'separate company'.
The pillock I spoke with said that it was my fault for not understanding that I had ordered a voucher not a product despite the order summary saying that I had ordered the product, NOT a voucher for the product.
Apparently the small print says that they can mislead you unless you are very careful to read the small print and that the BIG PRINT of the ORDER SUMMARY is irrelevant.
I am going to send Amazon a CREDIT NOTE to be cashed and hide a micro dot that says that if any Amazon employee handles the credit note they are liable for a 1 million handling charge.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Feb 2014 08:26:20 GMT
Damaskcat says:
Oh dear - you're blaming everyone else because YOU didn't read what you were buying?? Amazon Local isn't defunct - still going as far as I can see - they do some good offers.

Posted on 4 Mar 2014 12:36:33 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 5 Mar 2014 23:45:02 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Mar 2014 21:39:50 GMT
Ivan says:
Many years ago, following an appeal from "the Fraud Squad..." I began forwarding details of scams I'd encountered together with WHOIS and TRACEROUTE reports and any other info I could pull together or hack, with cross-referenced "different but obviously related" analysis and I sent a steady stream of this for some months, doing as much of the nerdwork as I could for them.

Months later I followed this up and asked the squad how it was going and how they were following up the research I'd presented them with, expecting some guff about imminent prosecutions or somesuch.
Their response?

They told me they were forwarding the URLs or originating names of emails to abuse@relevantISP

Obviously I then gave up on the whole pointless exercise.

If their whole strategy was simply to shut down domain name (which could simply, immediately be replaced by different ones, and which were probably end of route patsies anyway, not the real originators) without even bothering with the _people_ actually perpetrating the frauds and scams, what is the point of the police even being part of the chain?

I have no idea whether it is cluelessness or laziness but there's no wonder these things are proliferating

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Mar 2014 21:45:42 GMT
Ivan says:
I had exactly the same experience five or six years ago. They froze my account as part of some arbitrary security initiative, as far as I know picking me at random and bouncing my transactions with all the attendant complications one might expect. It took _weeks_ to get things sorted. I remember it was several days establishing whether or not Paypal was legitimately involved. It was a nightmare.
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Participants:  9
Total posts:  11
Initial post:  2 Jul 2012
Latest post:  25 Mar 2014

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