Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Customer Discussions > science fiction discussion forum

H G Wells like books


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-22 of 22 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 30 Jun 2009 13:27:48 BDT
Mr T says:
I've read everything the Shakespeare of SF has written and a couple of Wellsalikes too. Stephen Baxter's Time Ships was excellent but Ronald Wright's Scientific Romance is the best so far. I'm sure there must be more. Brian Aldiss has Dr Moreau's Other Island of course. Anybody know of any more?

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Jul 2009 10:20:31 BDT
Chris Burns says:
'The Space Machine' by Christopher Priest is pretty good. It fuses together War of the Worlds and the Time Machine. Herbert George Wells even makes an appearance himself

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2009 20:14:11 GMT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 30 Oct 2012 18:33:51 GMT
I sould think that the nearest to old "H.G." now days is steampunk.
There's a lot out there, as a start I highly recommend the books of Stephen Hunt starting with "The Court Of The Air".

Posted on 30 Oct 2012 20:32:15 GMT
M. Jolliff says:
Kipling's Science Fiction: Including "As Easy as ABC" and "With the Night Mail": SF and Fantasy Stories by a Master Story Teller
The Difference Engine (S.F. MASTERWORKS)

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Oct 2012 21:28:23 GMT
monica says:
I don't know which is worst: Intruding on a discussion to advertise oneself, comparing oneself to Wells and Verne, or, utterly bizarrely, implying that those two were steam punk meets space opera.

Posted on 5 Nov 2012 07:13:43 GMT
XRNOHPORTER says:
Try some John Wyndham, especially The Day of the Triffids. A short book but a classic.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Nov 2012 12:09:23 GMT
diligaf says:
I agree with you

Posted on 6 Nov 2012 13:40:43 GMT
Ken O'Neill says:
Edwin Abbott's "Flatland", available from this very e-porium in a variety of formats.
Possibly Issac Asimov (editor, not author) "Before the Golden Age" might also appeal.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 21:56:51 GMT
A customer says:
neither particularly offends me

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 00:36:16 GMT
Anita says:
Makes one wonder, if you perhaps can be offended by something totally innocent then

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 17:17:27 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Nov 2012 17:18:07 GMT
gingivitis says:
Catherine Greenall's Quirk of Destiny has echoes of John Wyndham - rapid breakdown of society but with modern themes of GM crops and the use of social media for limited world-wide contact at a time of chaos.

Posted on 17 Nov 2012 05:35:47 GMT
I have to wonder if some of these posters have actually read any Wells or Verne, or even any steampunk or spaceopera?

Posted on 24 Nov 2012 10:21:49 GMT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 24 Nov 2012 11:20:34 GMT
I urge you to follow Chris Burns' advice and read The Space Machine. It's wonderful.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2012 12:10:30 GMT
Anita says:
So don't self-promote, and you'll have nothing to apologize for.

In addition to that - are you saying you have no imagination or ideas of your own and are using classics to create a cover version? Self-promotion aside, that makes a clear no for me, sorry

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2012 12:18:15 GMT
Anita says:
No offence, just this seems to be a Christophers' thread... :)

Christopher (!) Priest most probably is a good author, however after reading The Space Machine I was totally put off reading anything by him for a long time. If you like homages (a polite term), maybe it's for you. Personally, I thoroughly hated the book. A personal opinion: if you can't create something of your own, better restrain from writing altogether. So my advice: re-read Time Machine and War of the Worlds instead

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2012 13:42:37 GMT
A customer says:
are you innocent? ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2012 13:45:10 GMT
Anita says:
Have I really offended you?

Posted on 24 Nov 2012 13:48:59 GMT
A customer says:
Lol...never!

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2012 14:41:59 GMT
No offence taken, Anita, everyone's taste is different.

Posted on 2 Mar 2013 20:44:38 GMT
I am now sixty but recall reading some SF stories in my childhood about a character named Kemlo. One was called 'The Zones of Silence'.

Does anyone else remember these?
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the science fiction discussion forum (570 discussions)

More Customer Discussions

Most active community forums
Most active product forums

Amazon forums
 

This discussion

Participants:  16
Total posts:  22
Initial post:  30 Jun 2009
Latest post:  2 Mar 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions