Customer Discussions > romance discussion forum

What romance novel should have been a movie?


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-12 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 23 Feb 2011 18:58:13 GMT
What romance novel do you think should have been made into a movie? And what movie ruined a great novel?

Under The Midnight Sky

Posted on 24 Feb 2011 06:59:38 GMT
Last edited by the author on 3 Oct 2011 04:02:32 BDT
I really think any Lori Fosters FULL length novels should be made into movies..honestly EVERY book I've read...ruined the movie...no movie can compare to a good book. They have to cut all the details out...

Eli

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Feb 2011 10:32:15 GMT
I would definitely like to see Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles or Trial by Fire by Jo Davis. IF they are made properly! Just the mere thought makes me whimper with eagerness hahah :D
Practically every movie based on a book has been worse than the book, maybe apart from Harry Potter and LOTR. A very good example of this is Twilight. They really screwed that one up :(

Posted on 27 Feb 2011 16:37:37 GMT
Hi Gitte Gade, I have heard a lot of people say that about twilight. I really disliked the movie with a passion unknown to man. The characters didn't seem to grow the plot was very A-B and the whole story was limp, but many of my readers have said on Facebook that the Twilight novels are nothing like the movie. Makes you wonder how they could have got the movie so wrong. One movie that ruined a book for me. Not a romance. It was Lord of the Rings. Those films made no sense!

Under The Midnight Sky

Posted on 27 Feb 2011 17:50:46 GMT
L. H. Smith says:
For a lovely romance AND an exciting story I think Helen Spring's 'The Chainmakers' would make a wonderful film...different backgrounds, from the heroine's poverty when young, to the liberal attitudes of an artists colony in France, and then to New York at the time of Prohibition - I can recommend it to any reader (also just put on Kindle) and also to any film maker who wants something with real heart.

Laura

Posted on 1 Mar 2011 13:56:45 GMT
Hi Laura, do you think a film maker could do it justice? I have asked this question on a few forums when talking about movies that ruined books for people because they were filmed so badly.

Under The Midnight Sky

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Mar 2011 15:51:49 GMT
L. H. Smith says:
Well Simon, I suppose it depends on the film maker and the quality of the director....I know that many good stories make bad films, and that a mediocre story can be rescued by a superb treatment. If David Lean was still alive and directed it, I know I would be happy!
It is very hard for an author to decide what to do IF they are lucky enough to get an offer. My response would be...'I'll let you have it for a low price if I am allowed to veto anything I hate...but if you want to treat it any way you want you will have to pay VERY much more money'. In other words, don't let your work be ruined unless you are well compensated.

Laura

Posted on 1 Mar 2011 22:33:38 GMT
Hi Laura, I was actually talking about this very subject with a few author friends of mine the other day. They were saying they would never sell their books to be a movie if they couldn't veto anything they hate. I am torn. I love writing, but I think it is like anything in life. When someone takes someone elses work and then turns it into another format (book - film) it is really just their take on that story. I think it is why so many movies these days are being re-made and the stories are very different. I think if a book I wrote was turned into a movie I would have to walk away from the project because I give my publisher a hard enough time as it is, lol. They don't really ask me to change anything, but I am funny about even the slightest thing being changed. Only one time did they ask me to change an ending. I refused and released it myself. It out solded by published books. They did not appreciate the "I told you so" e-mail. Also, lol, the only problem I have with my american publisher is that english slang does not translate!!!

Under The Midnight Sky

Posted on 2 Mar 2011 10:47:19 GMT
suzy says:
Diana Gabladon's outland series, that should def be a movie, they were talking about it, but i dont know if anything has come of it yet.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Mar 2011 12:58:59 GMT
Last edited by the author on 2 Mar 2011 13:01:00 GMT
L. H. Smith says:
Oh Simon, I so understand. When you write a book you feel it is something so precious, almost like your own child. how could you hand it over? And yet....it depends entirely on what you want, it is not really a problem, the only problem is that you have to make a choice. Fortunately, as you have the copyright, you can make that choice. As I say, IF I was ever in the fortunate position of having that choice, I would certainly want to have some control...nothing done without my agreement. But if you really need the money... as I say, we have the choice. If you've been paid good money for the copyright and they produce something you hate..well, you can moan about it but you don't any longer have a right to complain. My further thought is this ..and unfortunately it is a point that lots of writers don't understand.... A FILM IS NOT A BOOK. Most writers think the film of their book must reflect the book very accurately, and we can't help feeling like that. Film makers would say that a film should exist on its own terms, as a film, and it should not be a copy of something else, even if based on the same idea or story. It is told in a completely different way. I'm going to get some stick about this I know, but think about it...
Also Hi to S Pickard... I agree about Diana Gabaldons books, she is great. I think this thread is somewhat academic, though, I don't expect I'll ever be in the fortunate position of having this dilemma!

Posted on 2 Mar 2011 23:14:41 GMT
Not many authors manage to get enough sway to have any say in what goes on with their book when it becomes a film. If you look at Stephenie Meyer, she only managed to get any real say in the Twilight saga when the third film came around. In fact she had enough sway to insist that a particular key scene be included, that they were intending to omit. It was a major scene so I am glad that she won that battle. It's no coincidence that the third film was the best so far.
The difficult thing is getting the right balance. Sometimes things have to be changed for the big screen to make it work. Some dialogue that fits well in a book sounds terrible whe it's on screen, for example. What you need is an author, screen writer and director with good relationships that all understand the source material well, knowing when to make changes and when to stick with the source.

Posted on 3 Mar 2011 12:29:14 GMT
I totally agree. I think film's have to be altered to tell a good book. This is why I would have to walk away once signing the deal. If I stayed around I would be moaning about every little change, lol. I think the best thing a writer could do is explain the reasons why they decided to tell the story this way in the hope that the director would take the essence of the movie even if they changed a lot of things around. I think some movies have done this and have made you think and feel what the book made you think and feel, but then again some movies miss the point about the book. They go for effects or big scenes and miss out on the whole message.

Under The Midnight Sky
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the romance discussion forum (608 discussions)

More Customer Discussions

Most active community forums
Most active product forums

Amazon forums
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  romance discussion forum
Participants:  6
Total posts:  12
Initial post:  23 Feb 2011
Latest post:  3 Mar 2011

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 1 customer

Search Customer Discussions