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YOU CLEVER B8STARDs:An open letter to people who know erm thingys


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Posted on 12 Oct 2012 00:02:46 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Oct 2012 00:04:41 BDT
Greysuit says:
When I passed the 11+ at Grange Junior School I moved to Park Grammar School. In the same year that I went there, it became a Senior High School. As a result - I was in the bottom year for 4 years. Notwithstanding that - in the third year - I broke the school record for the triple jump (aka 'hop, skip and jump') - and as there would never be another third year - a record that will never be overturned.

Les Granges Brulées by Jean Michel Jarre (with fond memories of my Junior School)

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Posted on 11 Oct 2012 17:38:29 BDT
easytiger says:
Yata garasu is a three legged crow said to represent the sun in japanese mythology. The three legged crow also features in mythology from Siberia, China, Korea and right across to Egypt. Siberian tales have their own version of the "Great Flood". The crow was sent out first from the Ark but didn't come back as was later found feasting on drowned animals. The dove sent out came back with the twig and was blessed whereas the crow was forever cursed and sentenced to be an eternal guide, denying it the chance of feeding on any dead flesh it flew over.
The reason for three legs remains a mystery, however in some rural dialects a crow is called a "Jake".

At The Hop-Danny and the Juniors

Posted on 11 Oct 2012 16:36:46 BDT
Lez Lee says:
I have a beermat signed by Eric Morecambe who was a tegestologist.

Boom Oo Yata-Ta-Ta - Morecambe and Wise

Posted on 11 Oct 2012 14:49:59 BDT
Carradale says:
(Got me back there nc, good and proper, mam!)

See elsewhere for details, folks.....

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Oct 2012 14:48:33 BDT
Carradale says:
Well it was a single!

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Oct 2012 14:43:08 BDT
nocheese says:
A little mat for putting your drink on has made a solo record?

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Oct 2012 14:28:13 BDT
Carradale says:
I would however commend anyone towards reading "The Ascent of Rumdoodle" by W.E. Bowman it being (and I'll use Wiki's words as I need to go out soon) ....."a parody of the non-fictional chronicles of mountaineering expeditions (notably H. W. Tilman's account of the ascent of Nanda Devi and Maurice Herzog's book Annapurna chronicling the first ascent of Annapurna in Nepal) that were popular during the 1950s"

Rather himalayrious if you will....?

Yakety Yak - The Coaster

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Oct 2012 14:18:13 BDT
Carradale says:
(No probs, Grey. How are you by the way? And Pinksuit? The brackets were meant to indicate an aside)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Oct 2012 22:50:39 BDT
Greysuit says:
Carra - hope you don't mind (ditto nc) but I'll re-post my last post so that it appears on the current page.

Hope that you don't have any nicked fences ?? !! ?? !!

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A vine (Latin vīnea "grapevine", "vineyard", from vīnum "wine") in the narrowest sense is the grapevine (Vitis), but more generally it can refer to any plant with a growth habit of trailing or scandent, that is to say climbing, stems or runners. The word also can refer to such stems or runners themselves, for instance when used in wicker work.

In the United Kingdom, the term "vine" applies almost exclusively to the grapevine. The term "climber" is used for all climbing plants.

Climbing by Mountain.

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In reply to an earlier post on 10 Oct 2012 22:31:44 BDT
Carradale says:
( Funny coincidence - Had a leaflet through the door just a few days ago for a local Indian Restaurant which I thought could have been better put ...

"Experience our Buffet Nights. £9.95 per Adult . Eat to your heart's content" (!)

Brilliant! )

Posted on 10 Oct 2012 22:03:50 BDT
Greysuit says:
A vine (Latin vīnea "grapevine", "vineyard", from vīnum "wine") in the narrowest sense is the grapevine (Vitis), but more generally it can refer to any plant with a growth habit of trailing or scandent, that is to say climbing, stems or runners. The word also can refer to such stems or runners themselves, for instance when used in wicker work.

In the United Kingdom, the term "vine" applies almost exclusively to the grapevine. The term "climber" is used for all climbing plants.

Climbing by Mountain.

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Posted on 6 Oct 2012 10:57:53 BDT
Last edited by the author on 6 Oct 2012 10:59:26 BDT
nocheese says:
'A Mars a Day Helps You Work, Rest and Play' - I imagine that this would not be deemed 'legal, honest and truthful' as an advertising slogan these days, although of course if the said confection were to be slathered in batter and chucked in the deep fat fryer for a minute or two it would become a healthy, nutritious snack, and a life on Mars would be perfectly sustainable, if short.

Heart Attack and Vine - Tom Waits

Posted on 29 Sep 2012 22:19:49 BDT
Greysuit says:
Barclay James Harvest released a single "Breathless"/"When the City Sleeps" under the pseudonym of "Bombadil" in 1972. "Breathless", an instrumental, was credited to "Terry Bull" (actually John Lees). The B side "When the City Sleeps" was credited to "Lester Forest" (actually Woolly Wolstenholme), who also played every instrument and sang. This obscure track made an appearance on the soundtrack in the 2007 series Life on Mars, although it was not featured on the CD release.

"Life on Mars?" ~ David Bowie.

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Posted on 29 Sep 2012 13:35:49 BDT
Mondo Ray says:
Is the same old sh. a kinda deja-poo?

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Sep 2012 07:46:10 BDT
Gordon D says:
Sorry. Of course I meant 1885. Life Was For Living.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Sep 2012 20:02:18 BDT
Last edited by the author on 29 Sep 2012 21:09:14 BDT
Greysuit says:
Deja-vu isn't what it used to be !

(using laptop as main PC is down at the moment (no crisis - just in the middle of a reorganisation in the study) so unable to produce 'iccle smilies' at the foot of the post.

An edit WILL appear later when I'm back up and running (if I remember).

Next day edit - desk-top back up and running.

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In reply to an earlier post on 28 Sep 2012 14:47:32 BDT
Last edited by the author on 29 Sep 2012 07:46:50 BDT
Carradale says:
Perhaps the re-publication in 1995 was an example of the eternal recurrence of the same event. And by that token, who's to say it was first published in 1885?

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Sep 2012 14:43:12 BDT
Carradale says:
Kind of undermines the prophesy angle if it turns out it was written in 1985.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Sep 2012 12:42:10 BDT
Mondo Ray says:
Tiny typo, GD, but 1885 is what you were aiming for, although I suspect everyone got that anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Sep 2012 13:56:16 BDT
Gordon D says:
Also Sprach Zarathustra, subtitled Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen, was a 1985 work by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It contained the thoughts of a fictitious ancient prophet, focused upon the underlying concept of the eternal recurrence of the same events. The book introduces the symbol of the Übermensch ("overman" or "superman"), a personification of Nietzsche's principles of self-mastery, self-cultivation and self-overcoming. In prologue #3, he writes:

"Behold, I teach you the overman! The overman is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the overman shall be the meaning of the earth! I beseech you, my brothers, remain faithful to the earth, and do not believe those who speak to you of otherworldly hopes! Poison-mixers are they, whether they know it or not. Despisers of life are they, decaying and poisoned themselves, of whom the earth is weary: so let them go!"

Alongside the dictum also contained in the book that "God is dead!", this makes clear Nietzsche's belief in the good of attaining the ideal within earthly life, rather than in a mythical afterlife.

Life Is For Living - Barclay James Harvest

Posted on 25 Sep 2012 23:36:04 BDT
Greysuit says:
Midnight Lamp, first published in 2003, is the third of a series of five books written by Gwyneth Jones and set in a near-future version of the United Kingdom. It was nominated for both the 2003 BSFA and the 2004 Arthur C. Clarke Awards.

Arthur C. Clarke wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey which famously featured :

R Strauss: Also Sprach Zarathustra.

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Posted on 23 Sep 2012 19:12:02 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 19:16:16 BDT
Wharf Rat says:
When president Carter lost his bid for re-election,in November 1980 he had lots of
unfinished business that he did not intend to leave that way.
Carter's Administration spent the next several weeks generating regulations at an unprecedented rate, until, in its last month in office, it published more than ten thousand pages of new rules. These rules, which, like most issued by federal agencies, needed no congressional approval, touched on everything from crash tests for cars to access to medical records, and a phrase was coined to describe them. They became known as "midnight regulations," after the "midnight judges" appointed by John Adams in the final hours of his Presidency.

Burning of the Midnight Lamp - Jimi Hendrix

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Sep 2012 18:58:21 BDT
Greysuit says:
I know that we are now following on from your 'Footsie-Wigan's Chosen Few' - but if I had posted a song for my 'off topic' post it would almost certainly have been Blue On Green by Booker T and the MGs.

Thankfully we do not yet have to suffer the press and their outrage at a 'blue on green' incident despite a degree of John Wayne politics being applied by some of the blue forces.

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By late 1974, the Northern soul music and dance scene centered on the Wigan Casino club and was attracting increasing attention from mainstream media in the UK, at the same time as original American R&B recordings which met the musical criteria of its fans, and which were new to listeners, were becoming more difficult to find. According to most sources, Dave McAleer, then working for Pye Records' Disco Demand subsidiary label, heard a 1968 single by the obscure Canadian band, The Chosen Few. The record's B-side was a brief instrumental version of the A-side.

If you want instrumental versions of classic songs then I'll follow Wigan's Chosen Few with:


In The Midnight Hour by Booker T and the MGs

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Posted on 20 Sep 2012 17:57:07 BDT
easytiger says:
In the 17th century a man named Gunther invented the survey chain. It was actually a chain of 100 wire links giving a length of 22 yards or 66ft or 4 poles.It was a much needed rugged device that could be dragged across rough terrain to survey for example plots of land for Registry purposes. The units may seem outdated but in fact most land registry records up until 1960 used these units.
They are still in use today on the railways as an identifier of structures on routes- 'bridge 13miles 14chains' from King's X for example.
Incidentally, an acre is 100ch x 100ch. The length between wickets in cricket is 1ch. 10ch = 1 furlong, 8 furlongs = 1 mile of course. So a one mile horse race is like a cricketer scoring 80 runs in succession.
Footsie-Wigan's Chosen Few

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Sep 2012 11:50:38 BDT
Last edited by the author on 20 Sep 2012 11:51:05 BDT
Carradale says:
Puce (often misspelled as "puse", "peuse" or "peace")[ Never before recorded until now as pewce] is a colour that is defined as ranging from light grayish red-violet to medium to dark purplish-brown, with the latter being the more widely accepted definition found in reputable sources. The Oxford English Dictionary dates the use of "puce" from 1787. The first recorded use of puce as a color name was in the 14th century, in the French language.

Puce is the French word for flea. The colour is said to be the color of the bloodstains remaining on linen or bedsheets, even after being laundered, from a flea's droppings or after a flea has been killed.

Quite right , et. Still waiting for a link from Chain Reaction
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Discussion in:  rock discussion forum
Participants:  43
Total posts:  1535
Initial post:  1 Aug 2011
Latest post:  3 May 2016

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