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Is science fact or faith


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Showing 151-175 of 746 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 11:38:58 GMT
Dr HotFXMan says:
Bellatori,

Watertight, reasoned, case closed. However, as Clive suggest, Diane will simply ignore it and repeat her assertions. That's the brain-mush that Roman Catholic indoctrination creates.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 11:43:10 GMT
Bellatori says:
Yes but one has a moral obligation to try...

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 11:49:09 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 11:53:44 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Hi Ian- my mother in law is a RC, as is her youngest daughter, and neither has any interest in science or the history of religion. Mt wife was brought up RC and rejected it totally.

Many people are RC by default due to upbringing, and although ignorant and deluded are not bad people. My business partners mother is a devout RC and even had an audience with the pope. A viler, more vicious woman would be hard to imagine. She abused her children and husband terribly, both physically and emotionally.

I share your view on the end of RC from this planet, and also agree that Diane will re-interpret it through her RC tinted view.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 12:31:57 GMT
J. Forbes says:
Golding is not American, Bella, so it would have been "Zip", but good one anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 13:22:05 GMT
Dr HotFXMan says:
"I posit that the case is exactly left open."

Then reply to Bellatori's points.

Posted on 5 Mar 2013 13:26:19 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 13:27:45 GMT
Dan Fante says:
Your watch has stopped.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 13:37:02 GMT
Ian says:
On what do you base this disagreement?

Posted on 5 Mar 2013 13:38:47 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 13:43:52 GMT
Ian says:
Well that wasn't worth the effort of looking back.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 17:20:55 GMT
Bellatori says:
The "one yot" of evidence that they do exist, is their name

Leprechauns
Pink Unicorns
8-legged aliens
Superman
Dragons
Mermaids
The Mekon

They are all names so they exist to?!

Well that makes philosophy easy!

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 17:44:17 GMT
Spin says:
Bellatori: There is an ancient eastern doctrine; "To name something is to know it". Only Judaism does not assume knowledge of Deity and thus has no name for it. (Science also encounters such problems; it names things arbitrarily and assumes, once named, the thing is "known").

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 18:31:21 GMT
Last edited by the author on 5 Mar 2013 18:34:00 GMT
Obelix says:
"Lord of the Zipper?"

Lord of the Flies was originally called 'Strangers from Within.' It had a lot more of Simon, and actually showed the adults in the wider world fighting in the navy and the air force. That's how the boys get there at the start, how the pilot ends up there in the middle, and the ship captain ends up there at the end.

Small wonder they kept returning it.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 21:18:51 GMT
AJ Murray says:
I think the final story has more impact because of the nebulous nature of the conflict going on outside the world of the children. That way it becomes almost timeless. It's a good story imo. Definitely one of those i recommend to others.

Posted on 5 Mar 2013 21:37:55 GMT
Last edited by the author on 5 Mar 2013 21:47:57 GMT
Obelix says:
I like it, although I've always thought The Inheritors was better.

Quick history lesson: LotF was only published after a junior editor called Charles Monteith pulled it out the slush pile. (The publisher's reader had scribbled 'rubbish and dull: pointless' on it first.) Once he got to the boys on the island, he knew he had something special. The book committee at Faber allowed him to discuss changes with the author before they made a decision. Once Monteith got Golding to leave out almost everything to do with the adults and tone Simon down radically*, they agreed to take it on - and paid him an advance of £55.

(*In the original he had magic powers, a radiant halo of unearthly light, and was in direct communion with a kindly spirit called 'The Man in the Forest.')

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 22:12:01 GMT
AJ Murray says:
Looks like the junior editor did us all a favour, i suppose when you think about it there are probably quite a few editors responsible for assisting the birth of classics by trimming away the writers conceits. They go uncredited for the most part.

Thanks for the recommendation, not read The Inheritors, but it is now on my 'to buy' list. As soon as i buy a new Kindle that is... lost mine while travelling and some lucky so-and-so has it and with over 80 books on it. I miss it, but can't decide on whether to straight up replace or go for a fancier one.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Mar 2013 22:46:26 GMT
James Smith says:
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Posted on 5 Mar 2013 22:50:27 GMT
Obelix says:
Turkey Twizzler,

It's a mere excerpt from a review I've already done for John Carey's biography William Golding: The Man who Wrote Lord of the Flies.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Mar 2013 03:16:08 GMT
Ken Chism says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 6 Mar 2013 07:14:36 GMT
K. Hoyles says:
Ken-
'Wow. You are clearly following the wrong religion.'

Which, in your view, is the right one?

Posted on 6 Mar 2013 07:42:30 GMT
Obelix says:
I don't follow any religion, Ken.

Try again.

Posted on 6 Mar 2013 11:02:52 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Mar 2013 13:00:51 GMT
G. Heron says:
I was wondering perhaps what bothers some theists about science is that unlike religion science doesn't give absolute answers, it does not make claims to absolute truth, at any given time science provides the best theories available at that time. Religion gives certainty; "There is a god", "There is a Heaven" etc. Science does not do that. Are some theists bothered by people who are able to deal with a great deal of uncertainty in their lives.?

The following is a quote from Richard Feynman which I have used before in other discussions but which I think is appropriate.

"You see, one thing is, I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers and possible beliefs and different degrees of uncertainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything and there are many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask why we're here . . . I don't have to know an answer. I don't feel frightened not knowing things, by being lost in a mysterious universe without any purpose, which is the way it really is as far as I can tell. It doesn't frighten me."

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Mar 2013 14:03:32 GMT
James Smith says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 6 Mar 2013 17:02:11 GMT
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Discussion in:  religion discussion forum
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Initial post:  2 Mar 2013
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