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What is atheism really?


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In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 19:07:13 GMT
kraka says:
Hey Spin did you hear about the elderly lady who consulted her doctor about excessive flatulence, "i'm lucky", she said, "their silent and don't smell". The doctor sent her on her way with a prescription and to return in one month. On her return she complained that things had got worse, they now smelt vile. "Thats good" the doctor said, "now we have cured your sense of smell we can have a look at your hearing"

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 19:19:46 GMT
Spin says:
Kraka: =)

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 20:38:56 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Kraka just had a long post to you deleted by some idiot at amazon. Got to go , will retype tomorrow, cheers, clive.

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 20:42:13 GMT
Just got one for no reason in the Anita thread.

I said worse things that were left alone.

Amazon mods probably all Bible bashers

Posted on 3 Mar 2012 20:52:31 GMT
Spin says:
Every bible-basher is an animal in bed; so don't be quick to judge! =)

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 20:52:38 GMT
kraka says:
C. A. Small

Clive sorry to hear it got deleted, i look foreward to the re-type, have a nice evening..................................kraka

Posted on 3 Mar 2012 21:01:45 GMT
Spin says:
Ones post being deleted is a matter of pride and assurance, not offence. If ones post is deleted, one can be sure that one is not conversing with "normal" or "knowledgable" folk...=) (there goes this post.....)

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 23:12:57 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Mar 2012 09:07:37 GMT
Sombrio says:
Clive,

What a wonderfully refreshing post. The sensible way you lead your life seems like the personnification of 'an Englishman's dream'. I find it reassuring to discover that it's still possible to live in that way.

I don't know how our society has ended up with the values it has today. It seems like life has an agenda of its own, and this is simply where the sum total of all mankind's inner desires has inescapably led us.

Nice to see you doing your bit for the the return of sanity into our daily living. (And great to catch up on the latest news of your new orchard and meadow.) Lucky horses !

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Mar 2012 23:21:59 GMT
nephran says:
Don't encourage the blighter ..

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 07:44:58 GMT
Tom M says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 07:59:24 GMT
Tom M says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 09:17:21 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Hi Sombrio, I wondered if you would be back!

A line from a song seems to sumit up- " all the lights on broadway don't amount to an acre of green"

Cheers, Clive.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 09:19:42 GMT
Sombrio says:
NN,

We all appreciate a bit of encouragement from time to time. It helps ease the pains and mini vexations of our daily living. Your well-intentioned quip gives me an opportunity to pull my absolutely favourite quote by the Dalai Lama into the light of day. For me, what he says cuts straight through all the layers of endless, profound philosophical nonsense that forever seems to build up around organised religion :

.

Whether one believes in a religion or not, and whether one believes in rebirth or not, there isn't anyone who doesn't appreciate kindness and compassion.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 09:34:41 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Mar 2012 09:48:36 GMT
Sombrio says:
Clive,

Nice to make connectiion again. Especially now that March, Spring, and all the daily-happening joys of trees and plants returning to life after their winter's deep rest and renewal,.... are all with us.

This time of year is one of my absolute favourites. It's the feeling of being surrounded by all that swelling potential that you can see in every tree bud. And the knowing that the joys of all this rebirth lie ahead of us,.... watching the visible return of life to the plant world.

We share our world with plants, and moreover,.... without plants, there would be no life at all. EVERY living thing on our planet depends on plants for its existence. Yet, how often do we ever honour and appreciate them in our mind, for what they give us all ?

I find it enjoyable to meet someone else who shares an understanding of what I'm trying to express in pathetically empty words like those above. There is such precious little point of contact between the world of living plants, and our world of internet words.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 09:46:16 GMT
C. A. Small says:
hi Sombrio, it is amazing how little people comprehend that those little buzzing creatures delving into wild flowers ( not the strerile non-sense most gardeners choose to plant) keeps the world turning, food being produced etc.

There has been a great programme on tv featuring Sarah Raven, called Bees ,butterflies and blooms. Marvellous programme, with someone who cares deeply and is taking the message to those who can make a difference. The RHS seem to have listened, so hopefully we can have gardens that are not wildlife deserts (due to an anal desire for tidiness), leave some piles of leaves, dead wood, plant species that attract insects and the world will be a better place.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 12:58:37 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Hi Kraka, I would love to know the parameters they use for deletions! Maybe I mistyped something and it was a swear word.
Anyway.

The current project is to turn about 1/3 acre over to meadow flowers. It is in three sections, one around the mini orchard, one next to my wifes studio which is also bordered by two hedges (also has four mulberry trees planted last year) and the rest is in a large L shape on a slope around the front and side of the house.

The idea is to provide a long lasting high nectar/ pollen resource for the butterflies, bees and other insects. This will in turn provide grubs for birds and bats. We have a rare ( for round here anyway) bat called a seratin, and the familiar pipistrelles. A very nice chap from the local bat protection group came round with his bat detector last summer and advised us what was whizzing about our outbuildings.

We have put up 10 nesting boxes around the house and outbuildings, with an owl box to go up in the oak tree at some point. In the last year I have planted about a kilometer of new hedgerow and widened the existing hedges with bird food friendly plants like roses that produce hips by the ton, or hopefully will!

Another trial is 150 ballerina fuscia which should grow to about 6ft high and wide and againis a very good nectar source.

We are currently watching the rabbits on goat mountain ( a 12*20*4ft pile of rocks we put in to keep the rescued goats happy.) being harrassed by three goats.

We also have two rescued ponies which are much loved by various local children, nieces and nephews, they both have saddles and to see little faces beaming as they walk round the field or off through the woods is a joy.

The last members of the family are two sheep that we hand reared from a few hours old when they were rejected by their parents. Shaun is now 56 kg and the kids ride on him as well, Alice is smaller and a bit shy so watches from a distance. We do not want them shoked or hurt so we shear them ourselves. Becasue we do not have the proper industrial shear ( 440!) we use hand clippers. The adverts for specsavers are so appropriate. Our neighbours are sheep farmers and think we are mental, the laughter when they saw our efforts at shearing was deafening. One couldn't speak, tears of laughter were rolling down his cheeks!

Any way hope you are well, and sorry ill health has reduced your exercise abilities,

Cheers, Clive.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 17:23:11 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Mar 2012 17:37:17 GMT
Sombrio says:
Clive,

Even though virtually the entirety of England separates where we each live, and although we the entirety of our relationship exists only in the airy-fairy realms of cyberspace,.... nevertheless I can't help but find myself stimulated with enthusiasm on reading the description of your gardening plans.

In particular, when I was the groundskeeper for the Buddhist monastery I fell madly in love with roses. NOT the over-genetically-tinkered-with Hybrid Teas and Floribundas,.. but Old Ramblers and Species Roses. Over the years that this growing passion developed, like yourself, I too became highly attracted to roses with an abundant display of beautiful hips.

Your post re-ignited this passion for me, and, (true to this recent development in my habits), I googled them just to dip into the world of roses again. I found this short extract and will paste it below just because you may well find it intriguing in the same way I did :

"If you'd like to grow hips for food or herbal preparations, you may be wondering which kind to use. R. gallica, eglanteria and canina are the preferred hips for taste and nutritional value, but the best overall is R. rugosa. The first three set their hips in autumn, when the bloom season is over, but R. rugosa sets fruit all season long. Rugosa hips are not only very tasty, but are easier to process because of their large size."

I planted a lot of Rugosa, (largely because you can get them so easily AND so cheaply). But the most striking species rose ,... my favourite of all, was one that originally came from China,... Rosa Moyessi. It has gi-normous, bright orange-red, pear-shaped hips, and ramrod straight canes that shoot straight up from the ground in clumps.

They're somewhat dearer, (about 9.00 apiece), but a few of them dotted along your hedge, (or on Goat Mountain), really make a lovely contrast.

I used to use a very old nursey firm up on the North Yorkshire Moors that do mail order, RV Roger. The advantage of them, (besides their prices being good),... is that any roses that are bred and grown under their conditions are all tough and hardy.

I'll tack on their email address if you ever want to titillate yourself with perusing rose catalogues during bleak winter nights by the fire :

http://www.rvroger.co.uk/?linksource=frontpage

.

One final snippet of information from those years,... if you have a birthday coming up and you would like a word of suggestion to put into your wife's ear with regard to a welcome present,... the very best book I've ever come across on roses is by Peter Beales, and is appropriately called "Roses". It is written in a catalogue/encyclopedic format, with bags of information in condensed form on every species and variety of roses under the sun.

(But, must dash ! My wife wants her computer back !)

Happy growing !

Cheers,

Sombrio

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 17:37:08 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Hi sombrio- cheers for the info, I have put in 120 each of http://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/garden_hedging/cluster_colourama_hedging/

http://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/garden_hedging/trailblazer_hedging/

And about 100 of these -http://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/garden_hedging/cherry_plum_hedging/

as well as the usual hedging, blackthorn, hawthorn, dogwood etc -http://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/garden_hedging/the_victoriana_conservation_hedge/

It should all look beautiful in the spring, and in 5 years time an absolute joy.

You obviously have not had the pleasure of goats. Their favourite food is roses!

When they escaped previously ( I had just planted roses) my wife was treted to the apparently hilarious spectacle of "goat rugby" which involves me chasing the ..... round the garden, rugby takling them, marching them back to the goat mountain, then going after the remaining two. We lost about ten plants- goats love prickly thorny flowering things, or dried up thistle, dead holly ( brown and crispy), curious creatures but adorable!

Cheers, Clive.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 17:39:15 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Just checked and what I have planted are rugosa types!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2012 17:50:40 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Mar 2012 17:51:10 GMT
Sombrio says:
Clive,

Thanks for the links. I'm going to check them out in just a few minutes, (but your reply popped up while I was in the process of editing all the typos in my post. I can't stand bad grammar or sloppy spelling in anything I write, BUT,... I'm an appalling, two-finger typist. I spend as much time correcting as I do writing !)

Anyway, just wanted to add that I'm well aware of goats penchant for eating anything even remotely edible. I think the only thng that they draw a line at is newly laid concrete and unrusted steel bars.

No, what I was thinking when you described 'Goat Mountain',.... was how absolutely barren of vegetation goat enclosure can look. Just to have something as abundant as a very shrubby, free-standing rose blooming away in the midst of such desolation,... I thought would make an interesting contrast.

Of course it would require a very sturdy fence around it,... probably chain link with steel posts,.... but Moyessi, (and various others), are strong enough to visually dominate a four foot circle of chain link fence),... plus,there's something refreshingly challenging about pitting your determination and mental faculties against a food-obsessed goat,... and WINNING !

But maybe I'm just on a human-centric power trip.

Anyway, it's just fun playing around with gardening ideas in Spring time. Wherever they come from.

Posted on 20 Apr 2012 01:36:25 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 20 Apr 2012 17:30:59 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Apr 2012 07:35:25 BDT
C. A. Small says:
Stop promoting this crap- clear off and do not return.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Apr 2012 09:15:51 BDT
G. Heron says:
Ash Vaz

I had a look at your link and read a bit of the book using the look inside option.
Do you honestly believe that science can't explain the colours of the rainbow or have I mis-understood.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jul 2013 05:45:12 BDT
http://www.globalresearch.ca/reflecting-on-canadas-sovereignty-americas-plan-to-annex-and-invade-canada/5341097......first nations/native americans of north america really don't care they are,one with the earth and flowers and basically consider themselves americans

http://www.globalresearch.ca/latest-news-and-top-stories

http://www.globalresearch.ca/north-american-integration-and-the-militarization-of-the-arctic/6586

http://www.amazon.ca/Americas-Deadliest-Export-Democracy-Everything/dp/1780324456/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1373248762&sr=1-1&keywords=william+blum

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jul 2013 05:45:19 BDT
http://www.globalresearch.ca/reflecting-on-canadas-sovereignty-americas-plan-to-annex-and-invade-canada/5341097......first nations/native americans of north america really don't care they are,one with the earth and flowers and basically consider themselves americans

http://www.globalresearch.ca/latest-news-and-top-stories

http://www.globalresearch.ca/north-american-integration-and-the-militarization-of-the-arctic/6586

http://www.amazon.ca/Americas-Deadliest-Export-Democracy-Everything/dp/1780324456/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1373248762&sr=1-1&keywords=william+blum
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This discussion

Discussion in:  religion discussion forum
Participants:  31
Total posts:  527
Initial post:  15 Feb 2012
Latest post:  17 Jul 2013

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