Customer Discussions > religion discussion forum

For anyone not aware of the recent event in this so called Christian country.


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 26-50 of 480 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 17:36:32 GMT
C. A. Small says:
the answer is rampant dishonesty and an inability to think.

Posted on 16 Nov 2012 17:44:21 GMT
RAB says:
I thought it was clear DB was quoting. I assumed the Irish Times.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 18:24:03 GMT
DB says:
AJ

This was obviously a newspaper article. Even you must have realised that. If not, the reference to the HERALD atthe end of it might have given it away.
Perhaps you would like to comment on the content, rather than attacking the poster for a change.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 18:28:39 GMT
richard says:
questions will be asked excuses will be made, things will die down, same old S*** will continue................i expect!

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 18:49:28 GMT
It was indeed obviously not your own words as it was well written. However, you should still attribute it to the source of your copy and paste job.

Perhaps you could actually grace us with your own point of view on this rather than co-opting another person's.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 18:53:30 GMT
Spin says:
CA: Modern Eire is no more a Catholic country than modern England is a Protestant country. To think so is to subscribe to an out-dated stereotype. Further, one does not have to be a theist or member of an organised religion or political party to disgree with abortion; it is a moral, not religious or political, issue. The UK legalised abortion not under the argument that "It opposes Catholicism" but under the argument that abortion was a womans right under certain conditions and safegaurds. The Uk law on abortion has nothing to do with religion. So why think that an anti-abortion law has anything to do with religion simply because both law and church doctrine agree on the value of life and disagrees with the UK that a foetus is "alive" only after a certain amount of time...? Or will you argue that the UK legalisation of abortion is the result of the efforts of the Protestant lobby with controls UK government and laws? If so why the conflict with government and church in the UK over gay marriage and women priests??

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 18:58:54 GMT
RAB,

No it was the Catholic Herald - she did state HERALD, but not which one. If I was a suspicious person I might have thought she was playing down the source which might possibly have a bias - good job I'm not ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 19:05:34 GMT
Spin says:
Charliost: So the abortion of a foetus due to the decision of a woman who was raped, or who simply does not want the result of a night of passion, is solely about saving the womans life? I, and many others both theistic and atheistic, do not object to abortion to save the mothers life. I think such a decision can only be made by the mother, but I object to abortion as a means of contraception. Unfortunately, you are equating one instance of abortion to save life with all instances of abortion. You are simplifying the issue to unreasonable and unrepresentative levels. Besides, you are bringing the issue of abortion into a case that had nothing to do with abortion except for the fact that the mother asked for one. She died of a miscarriage, not because she did not have an abortion. You can argue medical malpractice, at a push, but I cannot see how you equate a request for an abortion, which would have been refused regardless of the law, as somehow pertaining to the moral, religious and political debate concerning abortion.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 19:09:00 GMT
K. Hoyles says:
Spin - Catholicism is the most practised religion in modern Eire.
K

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 19:10:52 GMT
Spin says:
Wil; Religion and politics "tie in" with ones morality, but morality itself is the source of religion and politics. Moral issues require us, as human beings, to consider what is right and what is wrong, regardless of what religion or politics advocate. Conflict between religious doctrines and political ideologies are essentially conflicts of morality and ethics. Religion and politics are "gathering points" for people of the same moral beliefs.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 19:43:09 GMT
K. Hoyles says:
Abortion tends to be mostly opposed by religious groups. They also tend to oppose euthanasia, another ridiculous 'moral' ideology to prolong the lives of those who want to die. They seem to need life to be black and white, which it 'ain't.
K

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 19:45:18 GMT
AJ Murray says:
Diane,

When you post on this site you assume authorship of everything that appears under your name *unless* you are quoting something, in which case quotation marks along with a citation would be what tell us that you are doing so.

In addition the article you copied wholesale doesn't include attribution, nor did your post begin by saying that this was another persons writing. It is also *copyrighted* which is supposed to make you at least pause before bloody well copying it!

-"This was obviously a newspaper article."

No it wasn't.

-"Even you must have realised that."

Only because i am now familiar with your dishonesty. When the standard of yours and Tom M's postings suddenly rises by several grades, i have learnt to fire up Google and see where you are getting this stuff from. You never seem to have any opinion of your own, just vacuous parroting of tabloid journalists. Pretty shallow stuff.

-"If not, the reference to the HERALD atthe end of it might have given it away."

One word, no reference. No quotes, no recognition of the author or his copyright. No citation.

-"Perhaps you would like to comment on the content, rather than attacking the poster for a change."

I regularly comment on the substance of debates and rarely attack the poster, so you characterisation of myself is incorrect. The fact is that you and Tom M regularly display such cavalier attitudes towards intellectual property that it is now becoming a signifier of your own dishonesty.

Besides, i can hardly argue with William Oddie because he isn't here, and you never gave your opinion, so what is there to debate with you?

Posted on 16 Nov 2012 21:58:25 GMT
You don't know what happened (at this point nobody does) but hey, don't let that get in the way of a good piece of liberal pseudo-outrage. Liberals really CARE, don't they?

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 22:04:05 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Nov 2012 22:37:05 GMT
Obelix says:
As opposed to a hearty dose of condescension and wounded pride, theist-style.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2012 22:55:15 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Hi Karen- don't let reality get in the way of the rotating ones monologues. reality does not dawn in the world of spin.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 04:20:36 GMT
Last edited by the author on 17 Nov 2012 05:06:07 GMT
Spin says:
K: I disagree. There are many of us who oppose abortion but who hold that opinion based on a reflection of the moral and ethical arguments, not the doctrine of an organised religion. Society agrees with the law concerning the immorality and illegality of murder. Does it do so because of its commitment to an organised religion or because it reached an objective, considered conclusion based solely on mrality and ethics? I would say the latter. And euthanasioa is not only opposed by religious groups either. It is opposed by a vast number of health care professionals. A recent judicial case denied the validity and legality of euthanasia; are you to accuse the law courts of being under the influence of the church? The consumption of alcohol is forbidden by religion, but the secular government is also trying to reduce the alcohol intake of the nation, for obvious reasons. Is the new laws about pricing and availability of alcohol due to the chuchs condemnation of alcohol, or the governments attempt to enhance the health and wealth of the nation? My point is that people can, and do, have similar moral beliefs which have nothing to do with religion or lack of it.

Posted on 17 Nov 2012 07:47:05 GMT
Spin says:
The UK government halts the killing of badgers because of minority opposition to its plans but allows the killing of children because of the influence of the minority. Very, very strange...The definition of "right to life" is very fluid in the UK..

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 08:28:35 GMT
C. A. Small says:
Spin- not too sure how stupid you are, but the word is foetus, not child. You have been told this on a few occasions by me.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 09:07:59 GMT
Ian says:
The UK government halted the killing of badgers because scientific evidence suggested that A. it wouldn't help and B. it would cost a lot more than originally expected.

The UK government allows abortion (the killing of a foetuses, not children) in some circumstances on the basis that before 24 weeks (this was lowered from 28 weeks in 1990) the foetus is incapable of an independent life.

In both cases the government may have been pressured to look at the data and make a decision based on advice by pressure from a minority, but the decisions were made on the basis of information and expert advice. That's how democracy should be.

Posted on 17 Nov 2012 09:21:24 GMT
athanasius says:
extreme cases make bad laws. Heart sorry for the couple but they are now exploited as a test case. We dont haVE ALLTHE FACTS. I am pro life and totally anti abortion

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 09:51:14 GMT
"in this instance it seems religion played a massive part in the abortion not being allowed"

What massive part? Were there priests in the surgery?

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 10:03:07 GMT
Opposition to such things by religious groups is often related to an examination of history. I did an essay on euthanasia 10 years ago and was horrified by what I found out. In Netherlands where it is legal, it is also used for convenience, where dying patients are terminated early to provide beds regardless of their own wishes. There were also a case of children who wanted their father terminated because they had sold his house and he wanted to go and die in his own home.

I've forgotten who said it (some lady peer): "Today's right to die is tomorrow's duty to die"

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 10:03:18 GMT
Drew Jones says:
Are priests the only practitioners of religion or bound by it's rules?

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 10:03:22 GMT
Last edited by the author on 17 Nov 2012 12:03:28 GMT
DB says:
AJ
this whole thread is based on an article from www.irishcentral.com (original post by Charlieost), which is an Irish American Magazine.
All that follows here is comment on, and acceptance of this story. It was grasped with both hands by all on here who are pro abortion without knowing any facts, and before any investigation.
My reply with an article from an Irish newspaper in this context, is totally relevant.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Nov 2012 11:51:55 GMT
So priests are the only people who are religious? Really, Wayne, think it through...
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  religion discussion forum
Participants:  37
Total posts:  480
Initial post:  15 Nov 2012
Latest post:  8 Dec 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 1 customer

Search Customer Discussions