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Dhammapada Path of Truth


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In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jan 2013 21:06:03 GMT
DB says:
Spin
you just proved my point thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jan 2013 21:09:10 GMT
Spin says:
DB; you are quite welcome..

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jan 2013 02:17:07 GMT
Last edited by the author on 22 Jan 2013 02:18:48 GMT
light says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jan 2013 07:50:29 GMT
K. Hoyles says:
Light - who are you calling a swine ? ;)

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jan 2013 17:45:21 GMT
Spin says:
Light: And according to what standard and whose judgement is one deemed "ready"? Surely there is no room for elitism in religion...

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 02:27:21 GMT
light says:
K.

No one, it's just a metaphor for giving something to someone who wouldn't appreciate it's value.

Did you see how angry some people got over a metaphor ;o)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 02:32:06 GMT
light says:
Spin,

"And according to what standard and whose judgement is one deemed "ready"? "

It's a mystery, as one becomes interested a Higher Power draws them closer. As above, so below.

"Surely there is no room for elitism in religion..."

Surely not!

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 03:54:10 GMT
Spin says:
Light: So a "Higher Power" decides when one is "ready" to receive a Higher Power? And esoterica is a complex mode of communication advocated by this Higher Power; a means of filtering out the dummies and the heathens?

Posted on 23 Jan 2013 04:35:40 GMT
Spin says:
The core of Buddhism is the recognition of reality, not the elevating of human thought to deific standards.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 08:01:16 GMT
K. Hoyles says:
Not angry light, it was a teeny joke. ;)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 19:52:23 GMT
DB says:
Spin
Do you believe that it is possible to 'recognise reality' by any other method than buddhism?

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2013 20:02:35 GMT
Spin says:
DB; Yes. There are various ways to recognise reality, both objective and subjective. But most methods of discerning reality do not include a workable and verifiable moral or ethical prescription. One can choose any method one wishes to discern reality, but the truth of the information, and what one does with that information, is another matter altogether...

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 01:34:34 GMT
Last edited by the author on 24 Jan 2013 01:36:31 GMT
light says:
Hi K.

I noticed that you were joking but my post was knocked out because people's feelings were hurt so they fervently hit on the no button ;o)

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 01:47:45 GMT
Last edited by the author on 24 Jan 2013 02:18:43 GMT
light says:
No Spin, No one said that esoterica filters out dummies and heathens. Most people do not need it or have no desire to learn about it, that doesn't make them dumb. I think you've studied the micro and macro, as above, so below, more will be revealed to those who are searching. If someone is not interested there would be no reason for them to study esoteric writings.

The bible mentions this in the OT and the NT "Come near to God and he will come near to you."

Didn't the Buddha search for 17 years, making himself suffer hoping to find answers to life's problems? Finally after his search he sat down and became enlightened, would this have happened if he hadn't gone on his search first of all? Would he have been who he was had he not left his life in the palace? I don't think so. I think that after he suffered enough he was empty enough to receive what he was searching for, in fact his name, Siddhartha, means, "one who has accomplished a goal", derived from Sanskrit (siddha) "accomplished" and (artha) "goal"

SIDDHARTHA HAD A GOAL SO HE SET OUT ON A SEARCH BECAUSE HE WAS READY:

"Siddhartha and a group of five companions led by Kaundinya are then said to have set out to take their austerities even further. They tried to find enlightenment through deprivation of worldly goods, including food, practising self-mortification. After nearly starving himself to death by restricting his food intake to around a leaf or nut per day, he collapsed in a river while bathing and almost drowned. Siddhartha began to reconsider his path. Then, he remembered a moment in childhood in which he had been watching his father start the season's plowing. He attained a concentrated and focused state that was blissful and refreshing, the jhāna.

Awakening

The Buddha sitting in meditation, surrounded by demons of Māra; Sanskrit manuscript; Nālandā, Bihar, India; Pāla period According to the early Buddhist texts, after realizing that meditative jhana was the right path to awakening, but that extreme asceticism didn't work, Gautama discovered what Buddhists call the Middle Way-a path of moderation away from the extremes of self-indulgence and self-mortification. In a famous incident, after becoming starved and weakened, he is said to have accepted milk and rice pudding from a village girl named Sujata. Such was his emaciated appearance that she wrongly believed him to be a spirit that had granted her a wish.

Following this incident, Gautama was famously seated under a pipal tree-now known as the Bodhi tree-in Bodh Gaya, India, when he vowed never to arise until he had found the truth.

Kaundinya and four other companions, believing that he had abandoned his search and become undisciplined, left. After a reputed 49 days of meditation, at the age of 35, he is said to have attained Enlightenment. According to some traditions, this occurred in approximately the fifth lunar month, while, according to others, it was in the twelfth month. From that time, Gautama was known to his followers as the Buddha or "Awakened One" ("Buddha" is also sometimes translated as "The Enlightened One"). He is often referred to in Buddhism as Shakyamuni Buddha, or "The Awakened One of the Shakya Clan."

According to Buddhism, at the time of his awakening he realized complete insight into the cause of suffering, and the steps necessary to eliminate it. These discoveries became known as the "Four Noble Truths", which are at the heart of Buddhist teaching. Through mastery of these truths, a state of supreme liberation, or Nirvana, is believed to be possible for any being. The Buddha described Nirvāna as the perfect peace of a mind that's free from ignorance, greed, hatred and other afflictive states, or "defilements"

.

So you see Spin, Siddhartha was searching because he was ready, that does not make anyone else dumb, they are just not ready.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 02:20:34 GMT
Spin says:
Light: After many years engaged in esoterica, Buddha finally realised how pointless it was. Esoterica disguises reality under a haze of poetic verbal expression. As Buddha notes, one can describe reality any way one wishes but that does not alter reality in any way. It only alters your conception of it; an alteration one accepts because of the pleasure it gives. And, as you know, buddha recognised pleasure as the source of pain...

Posted on 24 Jan 2013 02:30:07 GMT
light says:
Spin,

"After many years engaged in esoterica, Buddha finally realised how pointless it was."

Nothing is ever wasted, he probably gained much insight along the way. Would he have gained such a following had he gained Enlightenment living the life a luxury in the palace? Who would listen to a man about suffering while he has a silver spoon in his mouth?

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 02:34:43 GMT
Spin says:
Light: Perhaps, but "Enlightenment" is the stripping away of unwarranted and unjustified assumptions from consciousness allowing a direct consciousness and awareness of that which is real...

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 02:54:20 GMT
light says:
Well you know what they say about the word, "assume" ;o)

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jan 2013 03:25:47 GMT
Last edited by the author on 24 Jan 2013 06:19:04 GMT
Spin says:
Light: Indeed. =) But I never understood that phrase; how can one persons assumption make an arse of another person? But then, English-speakers were never too concerned with linguistic or conceptual accuracy...If one can create a joke from a word or phrase, that's enough for us =)
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This discussion

Discussion in:  religion discussion forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  244
Initial post:  16 Dec 2012
Latest post:  24 Jan 2013

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