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Is Zen the 'ultimate religion'?


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Initial post: 23 Mar 2012 05:35:05 GMT
Last edited by the author on 23 Mar 2012 05:35:46 GMT
Now before we get a leaping about and jibber jabbering from the linguistic semanticists. I know Zen "is" often thought about as a 'non-religion'. In fact for the linguistic semanticists let's be clear...nothing "is" anything.

However in "ordinary speak" we use the word religion to lump together a system of thoughts-feelings that are usually about "meanings" and "values". From my own research I believe that the study of Zen opens the door not to the religious mind but to the true religious being.

Zen being open and free from dogma and tradition offers us a chance to drop the ego and enter a space inside ourselves where we can access the left pre-frontal cortex. Using mindfulness based training the reptile brain stem and the limbic amygdala can be made to be our friends and stop creating stress, anxiety and other problems caused by cortisol.

Zen creates a new brain. Then and ONLY then can we create a new mind. Brain first....mind second.

Posted on 23 Mar 2012 05:43:48 GMT
Yes...Woof!.. Meow!.. Baaa!..........

Posted on 23 Mar 2012 06:21:17 GMT
M. Jolliff says:
anybody got a stick?

Posted on 23 Mar 2012 06:26:08 GMT
J.Yasimoto says:
Mu.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 10:05:00 GMT
richard says:
if there's no ridiculous dogma, rape, pillage, torture, life long guilt and fear of the hereafter then it's a religion for poofs.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 10:35:53 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 11:40:27 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: Where did you get the idea that Zen ( from the Indian "Dhyana" meaning "meditation") "creates a new brain". Zen and Ch'an are a means of "pure seeing", of releasing the mind from its attachments, including the physical body.

Posted on 23 Mar 2012 11:43:43 GMT
gille liath says:
It's not a religion. But it's ideal consumer spirituality: it sounds really deep and mysterious, breaks the ice at parties, and doesn't commit you to anything.

(I'm not saying that there's nothing in it, folks: just that it's perfect for Western dabblers.)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 11:57:45 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 12:05:20 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 12:18:36 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: Sorry, but I believe that the attempts to introduce Science into Zen (or Zen into science) are foolish. Zen is based on there being "no right answers", so to speak. To try and base Zen on scientific fact is to defeat the anti-materialism and objection to attachment which forms the basis of Zen philosophy. In my opinion, such theories are akin to "Christian Science"; sheer speculation which attempts to justify a spiritual belief by reference to an interpretation of scienctific fact.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 12:57:20 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 12:58:13 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 13:03:20 GMT
Huck Flynn says:
it has plenty of T-shirts

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 13:08:51 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: Zen is a philosophy. t is based on the teachings of the sixth century Indian monk, Bodihdharma. Its philosophy is based on its claim that buddhism has become too concerned with texts rather than the realisation of reality. There are two schools of Zen philosophy; Ch'an (chinese) and Zen (japanese). The chinese branch, Chan, has been influenced by the Tao (and seems to be what you are refering to). Due to the dominance of Tao in China, Chan became very Taoist in its philosophy and practice. Unfortunately in the West Zen is now considered in taoist terms. In fact "Zen" is the japanese branch of Bodhidharmas school of philosophy and leans more towards the principles of buddhism, rather than taoism.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 13:10:31 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: your very dismissal of Zen practices, coupled with your admiration for psuedo-science, proves you know nothing of Zen, Buddhism or Taoism, but are simply impressed by a book you happened to read.

Posted on 23 Mar 2012 13:38:08 GMT
Spin says:
If one wants to know what Zen is, read about Zen, Taoism and Buddhism, not neuropsychology.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:09:07 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:10:23 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:15:58 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: You seem to be a person more admiring of science than Zen. Why then are you arguing a subject you are not interested in? Are you seeking a fulfilment science cannot provide you with but are afraid to give up your empiricism for fear you may that you have been wrong all these years? I do not take seriously anyone who questions Zen, apparently seeking genuine debate, then calling it "clap-trap" simply to defend ignorance of the subject. Sorry. Read upon the subject and then accuse and deride me.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:27:03 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:36:01 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: No offence, but you completely misunderstand the point and philosophy of Zen. Zen does not offer the opportunity to disregard everything in favour of ones own benefit (it is not a western capitalist ideology) =) Zen is the unification, the balance, of mind with reality. Do not be influenced by authors seeking audiences and book-sales. The unity of science and Zen lies not within popular tomes, but with ones actual understanding of Zen and ones awareness of reality. Zen is not nihilism, as you are interpreting it. It is actualisation of self. If you admire Zen simply because you think it allows you to dismiss everything, then you have seriously mistunderstood it (not your fault, but that of the fools whose books you read).

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:49:10 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:52:56 GMT
Spin says:
Simon: Ok. Believe as you wish. Just try not to misrepresent Zen, Tao or Buddhism, ok?

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Mar 2012 14:56:59 GMT
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This discussion

Discussion in:  religion discussion forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  90
Initial post:  23 Mar 2012
Latest post:  11 Apr 2012

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