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Initial post: 23 Sep 2012 16:21:41 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 16:49:25 BDT
Yangonite says:
So here I am on a wet and windy Sunday afternoon musing on whether Andrew Mitchell the tory Whip, will last another week in politics after losing his rag with the Downing Street duty PC.

My guess is he won't.

Thoughts?

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 16:33:04 BDT
TheFoe says:
He'll be the next guest on HIGNFY, be booed mercilessly and rightfully, before disappearing hopefully forever.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 16:44:25 BDT
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 18:10:45 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 18:13:40 BDT
Yangonite says:
Don't words indicate our true feelings?

Just another rich boy filled with an exaggerated sense of his own importance looking down his nose at the less priveleged.

This government has managed to p off the Police - bigtime!!

This is the icing on the cake

I hope the Constabulary don't let it go.

I wish they had arrested the git - think of the headlines "TORY WHIP ARRESTED FOR INSULTING POLICE"

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 18:21:19 BDT
Hope not. The guy has a bit of a rep for being an arrogant, over bearing twonk.

Sounds high time he learned a lesson in manners.

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 18:39:13 BDT
R. P. Hughes says:
Cameron will not get rid of Mitchell. He has the two defining characteristics of a top Tory politician. He's arrogant and out of touch.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 19:18:57 BDT
No...words are simply expressions of the internal state of a human at that time...eg we are all more irritable and bad tempered when we have a virus...less judgement please...more looking in the mirror...

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 19:22:44 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 19:23:09 BDT
Except he's behaved that way for years, according to most of the people who've worked for him.

Suggests the problem runs a tad deeper, hmm?

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 19:55:21 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 19:56:12 BDT
TheFoe says:
Perhaps they were "just words", but this came from the mouth of a government official, who would probably be the first to complain should a police officer not respond quickly enough if, heaven forbid, he actually needed them. As for "...less judgement please...more looking in the mirror... ", I don't recall ever speaking to somebody whose job is to serve and protect the public, like that. The next time Andrew Mitchell dials 999, he may wonder why it has taken so long before anyone responds!

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 20:01:18 BDT
TomC says:
I think it speaks volumes for the benefits conferred by an expensive private education.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 20:15:47 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 20:16:56 BDT
gille liath says:
I think you'll find they're calling it 'gate gate'.

The thing about this allegation - if true - is that you feel it's a glimpse into what they're really thinking but normally keep covered up. I don't necessarily feel the guy deserves to go, except that he's blown Cameron's cover. That's fine by me.

(It's interesting that he originally denied swearing; now he admits the swearing but denies 'pleb'. He, or someone behind him, realises that that is the far more damaging accusation.)

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 20:38:27 BDT
C Yates says:
Andrew Mitchell should definitely be expelled from the government, if not the tory party, but everyone knows that won't happen
Just because it's what people want doesn't mean it will happen (look at this government that NO-ONE voted for)
PS - There isn't anything wrong with private education, I'm educated privately and a Labour supporter

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 20:42:27 BDT
Yangonite says:
Hi GL

"I think you'll find they're calling it 'gate gate'"

I think actually Channel 4 are calling it "Gategate" which to me seems a bit of a silly name. I prefer 'Plebgate', hence my choice for the OP. No one so far, including your good self, seems to have any difficulty working out what 'plebgate' refers to.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 21:00:19 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Sep 2012 21:01:28 BDT
gille liath says:
No, but 'gate gate' is both cleverer and more ridiculous.Thumbs up for that. :)

(If you're going to use 'gate' as a suffix, i don't think you can balk at it being a bit silly. It's already silly.)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 22:21:46 BDT
Yangonite says:
C Yates says he won't be resigned, I say he will.

Let's see where we are with this next Sunday evening.

Posted on 23 Sep 2012 22:28:52 BDT
Yangonite says:
" No, but 'gate gate' is both cleverer and more ridiculous.Thumbs up for that. :) "

It's "Gategate"

Does the 'cleverness' reside in the fact that it happened at the gate to Downing Street and 'gate' is the same word as the suffix to all political scandals since Watergate, so it enables the same word to be used twice in the one compounded word - Yes! I see what you mean., it's devilishly clever.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Sep 2012 23:21:31 BDT
David Groom says:
Yangonite,

'Watergate, so it enables the same word to be used twice in the one compounded word - Yes! I see what you mean., it's devilishly clever.'

I always liked the idea when John Major was PM and his brother was announced when visiting no 10 as "Mr Major, its Major Major."

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Sep 2012 05:12:07 BDT
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In reply to an earlier post on 24 Sep 2012 08:09:38 BDT
Last edited by the author on 24 Sep 2012 13:16:53 BDT
Yangonite says:
What were the kids called - 'majorettes' ?

'We're laughing at the majorettes
smoking Winston cigarettes'

is a line that springs to mind.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Sep 2012 11:47:38 BDT
Last edited by the author on 24 Sep 2012 12:25:30 BDT
gille liath says:
Aw, don't be mad. I like your version too - in fact I thought of it myself. So, probably, did a million other people (and the rest of the country hasn't heard about it yet).

Posted on 24 Sep 2012 13:51:13 BDT
Yangonite says:
No problem GL.

So, where are we at with this now?

The Sun Newspaper claims to have a transcript of the exact exchange as reported in the constable's notebook.

Extracted from the Sun's website ( I have replaced f's with z's):

"He launched the rant at the officers after they refused to let him cycle through Downing Street's gates.
The constable said Mr Mitchell told him: "Best you learn your z***ing place. You don't run this z***ing government. You're z***ing plebs."
The officer, who wrote his report for his superiors only hours after the incident, said he did so because Mr Mitchell told him: "You haven't heard the last of this."

That is the version, supposedly given by the Police.

Mitchell's version however, in a rather weak and non-committal sort of way, simply says "I did not use the words attributed to me"

The two accounts are obviously contradictory implying that at least one party is lying.

If Mitchell is lying it is extremely serious - to have a Government cabinet minister with a lack of integrity means his position is untenable.

The question is, for people such as us who were not there at the time, is 'who is most likely to be the liar?'

Well, certainly the Police Force have many grievances against the present government. Something was definitely said - neither parties dispute that - but what was it?, in particular was the word 'pleb' used? The p word is by far the most damaging accusation in that it reinforces the 'Tory government of out of touch toffs' people's perception of the regime.

My feeling is that for the policeman to have falsely included the word 'pleb' in his notebook would have required some quick thinking, and a by no means obvious realisation of what damage inclusion of this word would cause.
I doubt this to be the case.

Also, Mitchell's description does not detail any words he used. When specifically asked on camera 'did you use the word 'pleb'' he simply reiterated his weasly mantra of 'I did not use the words attributed to me'

So, in my mind the constable's account is the correct one, and by implication:

Andrew Mitchell, the Conservative Government Chief Whip, is a liar.

Posted on 24 Sep 2012 14:04:53 BDT
Yangonite says:
I will also add to the above, that imho, Cameron is a fool for believing/accepting Mitchell's account.

Oh what a government we have!

Posted on 24 Sep 2012 14:26:07 BDT
The Sun Newspaper claims to have a transcript of the exact exchange as reported in the constable's notebook.

yeah!!!! coz the police never lie do they

Posted on 24 Sep 2012 14:29:34 BDT
Last edited by the author on 25 Sep 2012 07:22:47 BDT
i think the whole thing is just a ridiculous waste of time . the copper is a wimp and mitchell is a tw*t

END OF!!!!

now get on with some proper policing and also get on with some proper governing

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Sep 2012 14:56:17 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 27 Sep 2012 19:28:32 BDT]
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Discussion in:  politics discussion forum
Participants:  42
Total posts:  256
Initial post:  23 Sep 2012
Latest post:  25 Mar 2013

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