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The top three regrets on your death bed.....


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Showing 1-25 of 86 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 13 Jan 2014 16:04:41 GMT
Jules Baker says:
1.I wish I had the courage to live a life true to myself,not the life expected of me.
2.I wish I had not worked so hard.
3.I wish I had the courage to express my feelings.

Posted on 13 Jan 2014 17:45:38 GMT
Sugar, sugar, sugar.

Posted on 13 Jan 2014 17:47:02 GMT
Anita says:
I hope I'm not yet on my death bed. Hence if there is something, I may still try to improve.

You can always try to find some courage to express you feelings starting with today, Jules Barker

Posted on 13 Jan 2014 17:55:58 GMT
The GOMS will hammock/ponder the question.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2014 17:58:10 GMT
>>> says:
Has TNF/GOMSY taken any steps to see to it that he will be able to expire in his hammock when that last and dreadful hour arrives?

Posted on 13 Jan 2014 18:05:48 GMT
Jules Baker says:
Anita.I am sure most people who contribute to this forum have the courage to live a life true to themselves and express their feelings.Whether they work too hard is another matter?

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2014 19:03:27 GMT
Helen...the GOMS can 'internally hammock'.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2014 19:19:10 GMT
>>> says:
That's heartening to read, TNF/GOMSY.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2014 19:46:48 GMT
Last edited by the author on 14 Jan 2014 08:00:03 GMT
Gomsy has no plans for his death, he's waiting (praying) for a scientific breakthrough, failing which, he's got a booking to be frozen at the Birds Eye works with the organic soya beans.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 05:08:21 GMT
Last edited by the author on 14 Jan 2014 05:10:22 GMT
Spin says:
Jules: Upon ones deathbed, one will not regret any specific thing, but one will regret having regrets. Therefore, since one cannot foresee ones future, one must live in the present in a manner which is aimed not at avoiding mistakes, errors or bad decisions, but avoiding future regret as to one choices. And that can only be achieved by accepting oneself as one is and understanding that all is as it should and can only be.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 09:06:51 GMT
Last edited by the author on 14 Jan 2014 09:07:42 GMT
gille liath says:
I think I agree, if I understand you correctly. I don't believe that, 'upon one's deathbed', it will make a blind bit of difference what one has done or not done. That's just hedonistic mythology - ie a justification of the gospel, 'if it feels good, do it'. As for regrets, it's easy to have a few (too few to mention) - but it doesn't mean that, at the time, you could have done things any differently.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 10:17:12 GMT
Spin says:
Gille; If we spend our lives wondering what to do, we would get nothing done. Mistakes are a part of the learning process. Only the considered and intentional harming of someone can be a cause of regret; ie; a situation where one knew the correct action to take but chose an incorrect action for selfish or vengeful reasons.

Posted on 14 Jan 2014 10:41:07 GMT
Ghostgrey51 says:
A number of profound thoughts here (seriously)

I have to say it appeals to my quirky sense of humour that I would like to be in a position where when on my death bed I could type them out and post them onto an Amazon Forum

Regards to all

Posted on 14 Jan 2014 10:49:26 GMT
Spin says:
Why wait until one is about to kick the bucket to consider ones regrets? Why not consider them now and take steps to correct, or make up for, ones mistakes?

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 12:51:13 GMT
Anita says:
I wonder (mildly) why someone was bothered to disagree with that.

It may be one of those examples how theory and reality do not coincide, but it's a very good suggestion anyway, in my opinion

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:04:44 GMT
Spin says:
Anita: Well, it worked for me. I took steps long ago to correct my personal and social mistakes and in those few cases that could not be "corrected", I made up for them by other means. But I must admit, some experiences are hard to confront, never mind rectify. I have never done anything so seriously and horrifically bad that it cannot be rectified in some way. Some behaviour cannot forgiven by oneself or others.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:09:44 GMT
gille liath says:
Maybe, but a lot of things you only get the chance to do, or not to do, once.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:10:47 GMT
gille liath says:
Good point. When people talk about regrets it seems to be mainly 'things I wanted to do but didn't'. Hurting someone unnecessarily - that's a worthy cause for regret.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:11:18 GMT
gille liath says:
Best of all, following a sudden unexpected recovery?

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:52:26 GMT
Anita says:
You surely can't decide for the others, if you are genuinely sorry, and they still do not forgive you, it's their problem. Holding a grudge for all eternity you harm yourself more than anyone else (including physically, and I'm not kidding).

You should be able to forgive yourself either. Not to justify yourself, but in order to not become bitter and an unbearable person. Well, take that as a personal opinion

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 13:56:17 GMT
Anita says:
I'd replace "a lot of" with "some" though, as situations tend to repeat themselves (surely, not all of them). And surely you can't correct the past, what's done is done. You can choose to not do something like that in the future though. As I just said to Spin above - if you go on eating and eating yourself all the time for something bad you've done, it won't help anyone

Posted on 14 Jan 2014 14:00:41 GMT
Jules Baker says:
Remember:One's imminent death focuses the mind.I think possibly there is a subtle difference between regret and guilt.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 14:11:28 GMT
Spin says:
Anita; Regret and forgiveness and separate issues in the human psyche...Personal regret is matter of not forgiving oneself. But Forgiving, of oneself or others, is something that requires more than a fear of regret.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 14:14:43 GMT
Spin says:
Jules; Good point. I am "guilty" of a lot of things, but I do not "regret" all of those actions. "Guilt" is a social attribute; "Regret" is a personal realisation.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2014 14:15:16 GMT
Anita says:
One's imminent death sometimes makes one just scared of death, racked with pain, dulled with painkillers.

Please forgive my cynicism, but I'd rather be realistic than romantic about that. The proverbial "last words" are just an urban myth, more often than not. You'd better care about things while you can
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This discussion

Discussion in:  politics discussion forum
Participants:  10
Total posts:  86
Initial post:  13 Jan 2014
Latest post:  20 Jan 2014

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