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Don't tax sugar, ban it...


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Showing 51-75 of 96 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 16:38:11 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Feb 2013 16:39:20 GMT
David Groom says:
Gordon Bennett,

'Why is banning added sugar, as Simone wants, <<trying to find complex solutions to the most simple and basic questions because you don't want to face the simple and basic answer>>?'

Because the simple solution is one of eating less and exercising/working more. It is no more complex than that. Looking at banning sugar isn't addressing the problem, since it's masking the fact that most overweight people are both greedy and lazy (like me) and can't be bothered to do what is needed, so they look for complicated answers to what is fundamentally a simple issue. It's all part of the blame somebody/something else syndrome rather than face the simple truth about themselves.

'You write that you are sedentary are you fat? If so, why when you know the combo of eating more and sitting around is the cause of obesity? '

Not fat, but certainly overweight and could do with losing a stone or two. But can I be bothered? No, so whilst I know why I'm overweight, I'm too lazy to take the necessary action. However, I know precisely what it is I need to do to lose it. I don't need fantastic explanations or fancy diets etc. all of which is just about trying to make a difficult willpower issue somehow not my fault.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 16:59:03 GMT
You debate in a debate you call pointless..ha he ha ha ha...!

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 16:59:51 GMT
Grehlin and leptin the hunger and satiety hormones..may be screwed up in many people!

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 17:26:02 GMT
People tend to understate how overweight they are so you probably are 3 or 4 stone overweight, maybe more. Chances are that your behaviour will take years off your life and lower the quality of those you have left. What's needed to change your behaviour?

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 18:05:32 GMT
David Groom says:
Simon DHB,

'You debate in a debate you call pointless..ha he ha ha ha...! '

No, I make a statement of simple fact that cuts away any suggestion that there's anything to debate.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 18:13:28 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Feb 2013 18:14:18 GMT
David Groom says:
Gordon Bennett,

'People tend to understate how overweight they are so you probably are 3 or 4 stone overweight, maybe more.'

Maybe, but my BMI places me in the overweight bracket as opposed to obese.

'Chances are that your behaviour will take years off your life and lower the quality of those you have left.'

That still depends on a whole load of other factors, such as the fact that I don't smoke or drink, have very low BP and cholesterol and do take a moderate amount of exercise. Also, my inherited genes are pretty good so far as longevity goes. I also eat healthily, albeit too much. By this I mean that I don't eat that much processed food, chips, fatty or red meat, McD's etc. Plenty of veg, fruit, salads etc.

'What's needed to change your behaviour? '

Probably, a real health scare. Putting a tax on sugar wouldn't do it.

Posted on 20 Feb 2013 19:11:11 GMT
easytiger says:
Eat lard.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 20:13:49 GMT
Ian says:
I wonder if there are fewer transfats in lard made from horsemeat?

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 20:49:21 GMT
Just lard?

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 20:56:11 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Feb 2013 20:57:01 GMT
There's only trans fats in lard if it's been hydrogenated in a gloop factory and marketed under a brand name like Spry. What you want for nice chips is pure lard or beef dripping.

I don't think horse is very fatty, and it's probably too hard to make nice pastry.

Posted on 20 Feb 2013 21:00:15 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 20 Feb 2013 21:00:37 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 21:04:55 GMT
David,
Very good, the trouble is you're not representative of Ukey man. Strong, good libido, never out of breath, loads of stamina? How old are you?

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2013 22:48:47 GMT
Ian says:
Apparently a lot of lard is hydrogenated (though very few vegetable oils/fats are now). Fat from animals such as ruminants with symbiotic bacteria contains transfats (animals do not have the enzymes to synthesise tansfats but bacteria do) hence beef and dairy products contain transfats. Horses are not ruminants but they do have symbiotic bacteria which ferment their food and break down cellulose for them - I just wondered if as well as having a lower fat content (which is irrelevant to lard is it's just the fat) if the nature of the fats is different.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 00:02:59 GMT
I knew that stuff like Spry and shortening was a mixture of hydrogenated lard and veg oil. I assumed, in my trusting naivety that 'pure lard' was pure and unadulterated. The next time I shop for food I'll take a look at what the labels on lard say.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 16:01:00 GMT
Ian says:
I made the same assumption but have been told by several sources (none of which are 100% reliable so I'm still trying to confirm this) that lard can be hydrogenated. I'm not sure what the labelling requirements in the UK on hydrogenation are - can they hydrogenate animal fat or veg oil/fat and still just label it as fat or oil without mention of the hydrogenation?

Apparently the transfat content of unadulterated lard is very low and there is now considerable evidence to suggest that natural transfats made by bacteria are not especially harmful (and might even be useful in small quantities) whereas synthetic transfats produced by hydrogenation seem to cause a number of health issues because we don't have the enzymes to break them down.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 16:25:11 GMT
I bought a pack of Tesco Everyday Value lard today (The label said, "no artificial preservatives, flavours or colours...Ingredients: pork lard, 99.8% fat, antioxidant - natural tocopherols"). And a pack of Britannia-finest beef dripping (the label read, "agreat British ingerdient...ingredients: beef dripping...100% fat")

I'll try chips cooked in the dripping and pastry made 50/50 lard and butter...yum yum.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 17:30:48 GMT
Spin says:
Gordon: Well, Lard is cheaper than Vasoline, eh? (nudge, nudge, wink, wink. Don't worry I won't tell anyone) =)

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 19:02:32 GMT
Spin,

You're pathetic.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 19:08:00 GMT
kraka says:
Gorden, HI

Beware of CAUSE AND EFFECT

Suppose you heard the term *lardarse*......when you walk, from behind, it looks like your arse is chewing a toffee.

Oh the HORROR.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 19:15:48 GMT
Spin says:
Gordon: Maybe, but at least I have a sense of humour.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 19:16:36 GMT
Spin says:
Gordon: You dish it out but cannot take it, eh?

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 19:46:54 GMT
Do you mean a "senses of humor"?

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 20:30:37 GMT
But a rubbish joke Spin.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 20:31:56 GMT
Another crap joke.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Feb 2013 20:34:05 GMT
OK Spin, give an example of what you call me 'dishing it out'.
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Discussion in:  politics discussion forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  96
Initial post:  18 Feb 2013
Latest post:  25 Feb 2013

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