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Why do dustman work in the rush hour, getting in the way of those trying to boost the economy?


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Showing 26-50 of 189 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 15:07:12 GMT
He's butch not bitch.

Posted on 30 Jan 2013 15:08:31 GMT
easytiger says:
You should know, beloved.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 15:11:18 GMT
Tigger...the fount is a "revenue generator"...each moment he is working to save the Uk economy...

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 15:23:49 GMT
True, but no more so than you...I go on what he says about himself on here.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 15:29:21 GMT
Perhaps he does...ideas for new threads on here to amuse.

But that's not the point he's making is it?

BTW, have you ever heard a local authority offer enforced hold ups behind refuse carts as an opportunity to meditate or solve your work problems?

Let's have more avoidable road congestion, it gives us time to contemplate the meaning of life.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 16:46:14 GMT
Ian says:
"the fount is a "revenue generator"...each moment he is working to save the Uk economy... "

So your shop is not full of imported goods?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 16:49:12 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 17:06:56 GMT
Ian says:
AT best, retail just moves money around within the UK. It generates work and therefore revenue in exactly the same way an inefficient government department does (except that inefficient government departments share their costs among everybody rather than picking on gullible people). There is nothing useful being created there.

At worst retail exports money to pay for (largely useless - like most supplements) imported goods. I've never understood why Alan Sugar was knighted and then Lorded (I'm sure that's the word) for exporting billions of pounds to China. Maybe if you sold more imported junk you too could earn a title?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 18:44:42 GMT
Imported goods generated loads of added value and income for the British economy: warehousing, distribution, retailing, ancillary services. Most of the price you pay for a pair of Nike shoes made in China is made up of UK added value.

Britain would not exist, as we know it, without imports.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 18:48:59 GMT
Last edited by the author on 30 Jan 2013 19:04:36 GMT
IN,

Imported goods are neither use to man nor beast at the docks at Felixstowe, or UK made goods in a factory in Birmingham, are they?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 19:00:54 GMT
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Posted on 30 Jan 2013 20:06:45 GMT
kraka says:
Vitamins.?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 20:18:32 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 20:52:38 GMT
kraka says:
Simon hi,

I remember reading about the medical teams that examined the holocaust survivors of the concentration camps at the end of WW2. To their astonishment they found NO vitamin deficiencies in spite of the extreme cases of malnutrition and concluded that even the poorest diet will provide enough vitamins for the bodies requirements.

The promotion and sales of vitamin supplements is a massive profiteering con. Food provides all our natural vitamins. Ban the substitutes and stop the con.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 21:10:30 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 21:11:51 GMT
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Posted on 30 Jan 2013 21:46:03 GMT
Last edited by the author on 30 Jan 2013 21:46:56 GMT
kraka says:
Gee two responses including defensive insults.......i must have hit a weak spot.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 21:53:38 GMT
S.R.J says:
you aint half condescending sometimes Simon
S.R.J

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 23:31:09 GMT
Ian says:
As I said - might as well all pay a bit of tax for a government department to pay people to build and maintain a warehouse, drive empty lorries up and down the motorway, decorate and staff a few retail units, etc. It would add precisely zero to the UK economy, which is slightly more than your Chinese Nikes.

You're right; Britain would be a very different place without imports. The problem is that too many people seem to think that importing goods adds to our economy (as you do); it might add to our diets but importing goods is just a necessary evil. Only exporting goods adds to our economy. Unless you do international mail order then all you do is shuffle wealth that already exists around the UK and occasionally export a bit of it. The bin men holding you up makes no significant difference to our economy (though 10 min late for work might stop you exporting a few pence) but they do a great job of taking away our rubbish (and increasingly recycling it rather than dumping it in a smelly hole).

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 23:34:37 GMT
Ian says:
Most of the population have no use for most supplements.

Here's a hilariously ironic slideshow from Lance Armstrong's Livestrong Foundation on useless and unnecessary supplements:

http://www.livestrong.com/slideshow/550744-the-20-most-overrated-supplements/#slide-1

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 23:43:55 GMT
Ian says:
Vitamin D was a good answer Simon (but you knew that) as most of us probably are deficient (however I can't see that you'll make much of a living selling us 10 micrograms a day). Presumably you just sell the low dose vitamin D supplements? Not the ones that contain several times what people actually need and often considerably more than what is considered to be a safe dose (risking lowered life expectancy at least as serious as that caused by deficiency)?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Jan 2013 23:49:39 GMT
Last edited by the author on 31 Jan 2013 08:31:34 GMT
In,

But the lorries are not empty, they take goods people want to places where they want to buy them. The shops stock a variety giving shoppers a choice, and they can try those Nikes on for fit. How would you like to go and collect your groceries from 50 different producers?

Exporting goods means they can'r be consumed here.

Does your post mean that you don't buy imports, ever?

Your post displays a complete misunderstanding of what an economy is about. Your remarks are so wrong as to be laughable.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jan 2013 00:00:57 GMT
Ian says:
I buy plenty of imports as we all do, I just don't believe retailers when they claim to be adding to the economy or creating jobs. They provide a service which we all want and need, but they add no value to the UK economy (almost all retailers export money in exchange for goods - who wins there? Many larger ones export their profits too, I suspect Simon's not in that category!). All they do is move money which already exists around the country - it's like stirring the punchbowl at a party (and spilling some over the edge) and claiming you've added to it.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jan 2013 05:56:42 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jan 2013 05:57:36 GMT
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This discussion

Discussion in:  politics discussion forum
Participants:  23
Total posts:  189
Initial post:  29 Jan 2013
Latest post:  23 Feb 2013

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