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Bokeh for Nikon


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Showing 1-8 of 8 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 10 May 2013 20:27:06 BDT
EMANON says:
I'm after a Nikon prime lens primarily for candid and environmental portraits, bokeh is my number one concern, what does anyone think from experience, not reviews, is a real star performer in the bokeh department? I was thinking Nikon 85mm f1.8g or d - The Sigma 85mm f1.4 would be my first choice and I may yet spring for it, but a tiny bit pricey currently.

Posted on 12 May 2013 09:50:03 BDT
Just a thought - have you tried looking at one of the many bokeh sites on Flickr? You will be able to find 'your' lens from the exif data.

Posted on 12 May 2013 13:31:28 BDT
EMANON says:
Good idea - I'd not thought of that, the photo's I have noticed seem to be the pro-lens 85/1.4 - I suppose that's to be expected. I saw some stuff from the new Sigma 85mm f1.4 and wow - amazing, I'm tempted to sell my big heavy 80-200 to get one, love it, but just a bit bulky to be that practical. The Nikon 85m f1.8d is also a consideration for me for the price of a bout 200 quid SH. If you sell on ebay - people have the opportunity to buy a warranty, correct?

In reply to an earlier post on 12 May 2013 14:58:08 BDT
The bokeh is affected by the number of leaves in the diaphragm - have you checked that out?
Do the reviewers mention it?

Posted on 12 May 2013 17:11:18 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 May 2013 17:11:42 BDT
EMANON says:
Good point, like 9 vs 7 - I always keep an eye on that but find rounded 7 blade almost identical at large apertures, I find stopped down a bit though the hexagon shape is visible. Am I correct in saying if you frame a shot, eg head and shoulders the same size in the frame, a 50mm (disregarding perspective) will give the same DOF as an 85mm or 200mm ? The aperture defining DOF and Bokeh ? Never sure as the 85mm f1.4g always gets touted as 'the cream machine' whereas the 50mm f1.4g is often overlooked.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 May 2013 21:19:49 BDT
I had an old TTH Cooke lens with 13 iris blades!
I guess the 85mm is favoured because it flattens the face a bit. An old friend of mine has a prominent nose so I used a 135mm lens for a portrait and the result has been on her mantlepiece ever since.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 May 2013 23:08:55 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 May 2013 23:09:48 BDT
T.J.Byford says:
EMANON,

You are correct in your understanding of DOF as it relates to scale of reproduction. If the image at the film plane is the same size irrespective of the focal length of the lens that took it, then DOF will be virtually identical in every case, assuming the same aperture is used in each case. The math for calculating DOF will easily prove this.

Posted on 23 May 2013 01:59:26 BDT
EMANON says:
I think I may stick with my 50mm f1.8g (for now) Have got some very good bokeh shots recently at f1.8 - I do prefer the 50mm f1.4g it has a bit smoother look, but it's a little expensive for a 50mm IMO. Mentioning 85mm as a focal length, well 135mm on my APS-C I tried out the 85mm 1.8g and as well as looking astonishingly good before I even put it on the camera (not the point, but being the tactile individual I am, definitely a bonus) The 85mm f1.8g is for sure on my 'to buy when I can afford' list. I'm looking for a decent compact, preferably with an APS-C sensor also, perhaps second hand - I know very little about the mirror-less type.
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Participants:  3
Total posts:  8
Initial post:  10 May 2013
Latest post:  23 May 2013

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