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Posted on 22 Nov 2010 09:23:55 GMT
I'll set one if he hasn't by lunchtime.

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Nov 2010 09:00:46 GMT
nocheese says:
Post the correct reply - set the next one. That's how this game works. Come on Vambo, I'm sure you can think of someone.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Nov 2010 17:22:56 GMT
Carradale says:
Saw Beck Bogert Appice at the Grangemouth(!!!) Rock Festival in 1972.

I kid ye not....

http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/grangemouth-festival.html

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 17:12:24 GMT
* says:
Correct, Vambo. The legendary flop was Leonard Bernstein's 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and the films were To Sir With Love and 30 is a Dangerous Age, Cynthia.

Anyone else?

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 17:02:13 GMT
Vambo says:
Damn! its Patria Routledge isnt it.

can I pass it on please... i'm going out soon and i'm not very good at compiling this sort of stuff.

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 16:55:43 GMT
* says:
No, Schiz, but good try. The Dudley Moore film isn't Bedazzled. It has a girl's name in it which is partly similar to this actress's most famous TV character (that has to be the most unhelpful clue ever).

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Nov 2010 15:38:32 GMT
Eleanor Bron?

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 15:07:58 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Nov 2010 15:16:43 GMT
* says:
NC - shades of Hilaire Belloc. I like the combusting wig. Why Staffordshire, I wonder?

English actress of stage, TV and film who has had a distinguished career in musical theatre. She sang lead roles in several Broadway musical productions and premieres in the 1960s and 70s, not all of them successful, among them a notorious 1976 flop commissioned for the US Bicentennial from a famous composer and conductor in which she played every president's wife up to 1945. A familiar face on British TV, her films include a famous one starring Sidney Poitier and a 1968 vehicle for Dudley Moore.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Nov 2010 11:29:41 GMT
nocheese says:
Quite right dovorian. Here's the song that Staffordshire Fire Service tried to ban:

Tim McGuire
(Leon Rosselson)
Little Tim MacGuire loved to play with fire
Always hated water, never used to wash
Loved the smell of burning, of bonfires burning
Loved to play all day with his little tinder box

He chased the sparks as they flew into the evening
Hailed the flash of lightning and the burning sun
When I'm a man then I'll become a fireman
Then I can light a fire for everyone

When he was four they dressed him in a uniform
Sent him to a school with iron railings all around
Hated the school and the rules and the railings
Took his little tinder box and burnt it to the ground

Oh how he laughed and danced in the firelight
Oh how he laughed as the flames leapt to the sky
When I'm a man I'm going to be a fireman
Keep a bonfire burning until the day I die

When MacGuire grew older they made him wear a bowler
Set him to work in an office in the town
Hated the pens and the pins and the papers
Had just one ambition, to burn the office down

Little Tim MacGuire loved to play with fire
Loved the blaze of roses and the golden grain
Loved the leaves of autumn, the red leaves of autumn
Loved a slender girl with a smile like a flame

The judge said at his trial, Your behaviour has been vile
You're a menace to society though you may think you're big
You have to go to prison - and then, what a commotion
For smoke and fire were pouring from the judge's wig

Oh how he laughed and danced in the courtroom
We took him down, we locked him in the darkness of the cell
Never saw the sun or heard the songbirds calling
Saw the prison bars and heard the prison bell

Then early one morning just as the day was dawning
A great wheel of fire spun skywards from the jail
The iron bars melted, the stone walls crumbled
No one in the prison lived to tell the tale

No one ever found Tim MacGuire's little tinder box
No one ever found a trace of Tim MacGuire
Perhaps he's up in heaven setting light to angels' haloes
Perhaps he's down in hell dancing round the fire

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 11:23:21 GMT
* says:
NC - the only book I recall being banned in the 80s was 'Spycatcher' and judicious googling has produced Leon Rosselson, who sounds like your man. The book was less than riveting, so it was doubtless a sly manoeuvre by the government to let him carry on.

Will put my thinking cap on a little later.

Posted on 20 Nov 2010 08:47:54 GMT
nocheese says:
I've fleshed out my description slightly. Any takers?

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2010 23:53:46 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Nov 2010 08:49:52 GMT
nocheese says:
Carmine Appice - great name.

Our next performer is the child of Russian Jewish refugees, born in 1934. In the early 60s he was part of a quartet which also included two well-known Scottish musicians. He gained a reputation as a writer of topical and satirical songs; a local fire service once called for one of his songs to be banned, but the BBC to their credit refused.
In an act of political protest, in the eighties he read publicly from a book whose publication had been banned in this country, and from which it was illegal to quote. To his disappointment, the police and legal system took no notice.
He still performs, and writes books for children.

Posted on 16 Nov 2010 19:10:50 GMT
At last!!!
Yes!

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Nov 2010 18:56:29 GMT
nocheese says:
Carmine Appice, Schiz?

Posted on 10 Nov 2010 19:10:01 GMT
Drummer/singer/songwriter born New York U.S. He was a classically trained percussionist also influenced by Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich. First came to prominance in the late 60's as a member of psychedelic rock band. Later he co-formed a blues rock quartet but left them along with the bass player to form a 'power trio' in 1972. Later he joined a popular U.K. singer's backing band who he also co-wrote songs with. Has been member of several super -groups and has toured with people such as Rick Derringer,Mike Bloomfield, Stanley Clarke and Ted Nugent!

Posted on 10 Nov 2010 14:50:48 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Nov 2010 14:52:25 GMT
Of course, you're both right. Glad you didn't have to read too far in to get the answer, Gordon. And the Shoeshine Boy gets a mensh in the clue, Mark, though you can be forgiven for having missed it amidst all the verbiage. ("These recordings featured the first sighting of a guitarist who went on to make his fortune in a band named [appropriately enough] after an old Paul Whiteman hit. This guitarist went on to achieve [several times over] commercial success on a level well beyond anything the MA could ever have even contemplated. Nevertheless, the recordings that he made with the MA are widely considered to be by far the most interesting and artistically successful in his long career." That's not necessarily saying much, of course.)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Nov 2010 13:46:25 GMT
Gordon Dent says:
Glenda Collins. Discovered by Carroll Levis (i.e. topsy-turvy Lewis Carroll) and produced by Joe Meek.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Nov 2010 13:40:28 GMT
I'm gonna go with Glenda Collins Dennis...the auteur must be Joe Meek (incidentally, going back to our Deep Purple conversation a few weeks back, your favourite guitarist Rithchie 'Shoeshine' Blackmore not only played on many of her hits but was also a Meek regular session man!).

Posted on 10 Nov 2010 09:34:24 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Nov 2010 09:58:48 GMT
I'll apologise in advance for the length (to quote Jim Kerr's old chat-up line).

My mystery artist (MA) might claim to be the Anne Briggs of pop. Not that she has a talent to rival AB's - who has? - but several parallels might be drawn between the two artists' respective current circumstances, namely that both are living but in retirement, and in both cases the public interest in the work is greater now than at any time during the active career. The two artists were born just one year apart.

In the case of the MA, the focus of current public interest is her association with a gifted pop auteur, the pioneering nature of whose work has come to be recognized only in the past ten years or so. According to some stories, she exerted such a calming influence upon this auteur figure that he even contemplated marriage to her. Much in his biography suggests that the marriage would have been an unconventional one.

The MA's career opened in what might be described as a kind topsy-turvy version of Lewis Carroll, when she signed to Decca at just seventeen years of age. The association with Decca yielded three singles but no chart action.

The most fruitful phase of her career began after Decca dropped her. The first of a string of singles produced by the aforementioned auteur came in 1963. These recordings featured the first sighting of a guitarist who went on to make his fortune in a band named (appropriately enough) after an old Paul Whiteman hit. This guitarist went on to achieve (several times over) commercial success on a level well beyond anything the MA could ever have even contemplated. Nevertheless, the recordings that he made with the MA are widely considered to be by far the most interesting and artistically successful in his long career.

According to the MA's Wikipedia entry, she recorded sporadically after the end of her association with the auteur, which seems to have lasted three years, but Wiki provides no details. According to Wiki, the sum total of the MA's output during the main phase of her career (1960-66) is eleven singles: three for Decca, six for the HMV label and two for Pye. Although her records were aimed unashamedly at the pop charts, she produced nothing deemed worthy of the attention of those who compile the Guinness Book of....Guinness-Type Stuff.

Admirers of the MA's work (if there were any at this point) had to wait 33 years for the next (and, to date, last) addition to the oeuvre. By this time (1999) there was a strong interest in the auteur's work and in everything that he touched, and his working methods were inspiring a new generation of record producers. One of these producers lured the MA out of retirement to contribute a vocal to a track on a themed album. There were plans for live appearances, but live appearances (or appearances of any kind) were there none.

And that, apart from the issue of the MA's entire recorded output on a single CD in 2006, is the story so far. But as long as she's happy, then we should be happy too. And if you're gonna pick a biography, why don't you pick on this one?

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2010 23:07:19 GMT
Last edited by the author on 9 Nov 2010 23:11:08 GMT
Gordon Dent says:
It is John McGeoch of Magazine, Visage, Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Armoury Show, PiL, etc. Well done, Dennis.

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2010 19:05:03 GMT
Take your time Dennis, I'll step in if you don't post up by tomorrow evening.

Gordon - Moving? That's no excuse! What next? Childbirth, getting married? Being in hospital? Talk about selfish! :-)

Posted on 9 Nov 2010 18:08:34 GMT
Last edited by the author on 9 Nov 2010 18:15:48 GMT
John McGeoch, though much in Gordon's (fascinating) potted bio was news to me.

I'll try to think of a mystery artist, but if, in the meantime, anybody else has a bio that they want to use, they can feel free to take my turn with my blessing.

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2010 17:52:05 GMT
Gordon Dent says:
Sorry, moved house over the weekend and been a bit busy.

Born in 1955, this guitarist learned to play blues songs at an early age, but made his name in his twenties with a number of innovative punk/new wave bands. His most successful period was spent with an already established band, for whom he featured on three albums. However, he couldn't cope with the demands of touring and left after collapsing on stage in Madrid. Despite being described as one of the most influential guitarists of his generation, and listed by Mojo as one of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time, he was washed up by the age of 40. He retrained as a nurse and, despite working on some music for television series, had no further success as a musician. He died in 2004.

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2010 14:10:17 GMT
btw - Gordon Dent!!! It's your turn, come on son...get posting!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Nov 2010 11:04:00 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Nov 2010 11:04:32 GMT
I think you may have a point, nocheese, on matters of sexuality as well as ethnicity.

I've always thought that Nehemiah Grafenstein (as was) must like to take it up the tochas. Big time.
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Initial post:  4 Feb 2010
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