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Bands that, in your opinion have never had an average or bad album (3 albums minimum)


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Showing 1-25 of 82 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 12:13:08 GMT
Nugent Dirt says:
I'm only interested in output and don't really give a stuff how music is put together. I'm as happy with music that's been cobbled together with a 303, 808 etc or a by 100 piece orchestra as long as I like the resultant noises. There's a place for quality musicianship as long as it doesn't get boring. We've all seen virtuoso players getting lost up their own jacksies while forgetting there are paying audiences waiting to be entertained.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 10:39:12 GMT
well, nc, fire up the i-plyer and watch the rest of 'insane fight club' - the scenes of grado with nicky clarke, the hairdresser are precious.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 10:35:31 GMT
you're probably right, gille, but it's always been effect over talent for me. it depends on what's being expressed. would i rather listen to a note perfect guitar break/solo that could be played by any number of guitarists, or a guy with belief /passion throwing stones into a cardboard box? but it's not idealistic - i just don't like it.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 10:29:18 GMT
nocheese says:
J'en ai marre - French for I'm fed up.

Posted on 12 Mar 2014 10:24:56 GMT
Last edited by the author on 12 Mar 2014 10:25:24 GMT
gille liath says:
Well, some people are just allergic to good musicianship, especially if they're of the punk generation. I remember Bernard Sumner once saying he didn't think Aretha Franklin's singing was any good. I mean, really?...

Of course there is such a thing as pretentious showing off; nevertheless there's a place for actual good playing (which doesn't have to mean long solos etc). Rule it out on ideological grounds and you make music much poorer for it.

As for Johnny Marr, I've never heard anything to make me think he was other than a very limited player - whatever criteria you want to use.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 10:12:13 GMT
sounds like the making of a voting thread, nuge, but i agree 100% about perceived greatness in guitarists, particularly of the rock variety. most of it fails to impress, and i'd probably prefer to listen to the baboon. i enjoy such as poison ivy, for whom the pure essence of rock 'n' roll drips from every chord of her 1958 gretsch, or johnny ramones with his no nonsense, no solos (any solos on ramones records were provided by others), unique style.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Mar 2014 09:29:56 GMT
Nugent Dirt says:
Marr isn't one of the greats but in his favour he's not derivative. Then again I wouldn't give space in my dustbin to most of those players frequently cited as being great. Give a baboon an electric guitar and a box of effects and within a few of weeks it could play Purple Haze, Sweet Child of Mine and Badge.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Mar 2014 08:11:12 GMT
Reading David Byrnes view on the breakup in his book How Music Works is very interesting. He was the only one who could call the tough shots and that's what he did. His way or nothing, basically.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Mar 2014 07:35:23 GMT
Not at all surprised gille as I appreciate they are not everyone's cup of coffee, but I fell in love with their music - I'm too old to change now :-)

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Mar 2014 07:27:22 GMT
Red Mosquito says:
I've always been a bit of a bass guitar fan having played it in a band when I was a lad. It's the first instrument I listen for when checking out new music. The Smiths knew how to mix the bass perfectly imo and Andy Rourke could play it in a way that complimented Marr's 'convoluted' style.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 22:14:46 GMT
gille liath says:
Indeed. You may find it hard to believe, but I've never been particularly impressed by the Grateful Dead. ;)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 22:13:14 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Mar 2014 22:16:16 GMT
gille liath says:
Yeah. I don't think most of those who say Marr is a great guitarist would know a great guitarist from a hole in the ground. Still, I used to be in a band years ago and we did several Zeppelin covers; but although we liked the Smiths, we didn't do any of theirs. The guitar parts were too convoluted for us to be bothered working them out. The other two guys were pretty mechanical, though... almost anybody could have done what they did.

I think they were actually not just the best, but pretty much the only band from the mid to late 80s worth bothering with.

Posted on 10 Mar 2014 19:06:39 GMT
Red Mosquito says:
I'm a fan of both Zep and The Smiths. Having spent most of the 70s with my head buried in rock and prog The Smiths presented me with something refreshingly different. I found Morrissey's lyrics both clever and highly amusing most of the time. Having spent 10 years listening to the likes of Zep, Yes, Wishbone Ash and lots of Krautrock it was nice to chuckle along to some amusing lyrics with some decent backing music. Of course it's a matter of opinion but I thought those boys could play otherwise I wouldn't have been listening. There was a significant lack of music that interested me in the 80s so The Smiths filled a bit of a gap.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 13:53:38 GMT
Nugent Dirt says:
to whit this work of Wordsworth-like genius

Oh oh oh oh oh oh
You don't have to go oh oh oh oh oh
You don't have to go oh oh oh oh oh
You don't Have to go.

Ay ay ay ay ay ay
All those tears I cry ay ay ay ay ay
All those tears I cry ay ay ay ay ay
Baby please don't go.

[CHORUS:]
When I read the letter you wrote, it made me mad mad mad
When I read the words that it told me, it made me sad sad sad.
But I still love you so, I can't let you go
I love you- ooh baby I love you.

Oh oh oh oh oh oh
Every breath I take oh oh oh oh oh
Every move I make oh oh oh oh oh
Baby please don't go.

Ay ay ay ay ay ay
You hurt me to my soul ay ay ay ay ay
You hurt me to my soul ay ay ay ay ay
Darling please don't go.

[CHORUS 2:]
When I read the letter you sent me, it made me mad mad mad
When I read the news that it broke, it made me sad sad sad.
But I still love you so, and I can't let you go
I love you- ooh baby I love ya.
Oh oh oh oh oh oh
You don't have to go oh oh oh oh
You don't have to go oh oh oh oh
Aw Baby, babe Please Please Please Please
Ah uh ah uh ah ah baby
Ah Uh I still love you baby
Ooh Ooh, ooh ohh, ooh ooh Darling
Oh Oh-wo Aw baby I still love you so
Aw baby I still love you so oh-wo ooh

Oh oh oh oh oh oh yeah (fire)
Ah ah ah ah ah ah oh (fire)
Ah ah ah ah ah
Ooooh (fire) yeah
Oh Baby, Baby

magic! :0)

Posted on 10 Mar 2014 13:07:10 GMT
Sparky says:
Since Bowie seems to be considered a band I submit the McGarrigle sisters. Guaranteed to produce bitter-sweet reflections on the human condition with a bit of French thrown in for free. Quirky and enchanting.
(I know Toffeeman would agree but he hasn't posted for about 3 years)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 13:00:57 GMT
One man's meat etc gille eh ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:39:20 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Mar 2014 12:51:59 GMT
gille liath says:
You can sing along, but there isn't usually much of a tune! My point being, that's not a criticism. It works in its own terms. It might seem strange to compare the two bands, but I suspect the songs were written in a similar way: ie the singer presented with a complete band arrangement which they simply had to sing over the top of (at least Marr made some effort to match music to lyrical theme, which I'm not sure Jimmy Page always did).

Actually I can remember a time, strange as it seems now, when I was as irritated by Robert Plant's voice as you are by Morrissey's; and if you want to talk banal lyrics he has a far better claim. Some things you have to acclimatise to. But like I said I do appreciate they're not for everybody.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:32:02 GMT
The Who were very patchy IMO gille, but Zep studio albums were easy enough to sing along with I reckon.
NB. Who I Am is an excellent read.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:29:40 GMT
Nugent Dirt says:
To be fair CD, Marr is a pretty proficient player and does avoid most of the clichés most rock guitar players spew out ad nauseam e.g. the obligatory solo. Andy Rourke was also a pretty decent bassist. They did put out some good singles and a few decent album tracks. I used to have all their albums but found myself skipping tracks a lot on all of 'em. I just don't think they were exceptional and that there were far more interesting bands at the time getting overlooked e.g. Comsat Angels, Woodentops, Thrashing Doves, The Chameleons, The Sound, Josef K, Icicle Works...

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:22:16 GMT
gille liath says:
Yes to all that - except the lyrics. But a lot of bands - Led Zep or The Who for example - have managed okay without too many actual tunes.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:18:59 GMT
I cannot listen to the Smiths - lack of melody to most songs, a dreary voice with dreary banal lyrics, and I have never understood why Marr is considered a good guitarist!!

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 12:06:58 GMT
Last edited by the author on 10 Mar 2014 12:08:01 GMT
gille liath says:
I appreciate they're not everyone's cup of tea; it took me a while to get into them, myself. But I think they're a great synthesis of music and message - in other words, the (admittedly monotonous) music is the right vehicle for Morrissey's lyrics. They expressed growing up in Thatcher's Britain - Manchester especially - to perfection.

Frankly Mr Shankly - not sure if 'trite' is the word you want, but I think there's room on an album like that for a bit light relief. It's worth it for the classic lines:

'Oh, I didn't realise you wrote poetry;
I didn't realise you wrote such bloody awful poetry, Mr Shankly...'

A good example of how Morrissey could make serious points and be funny doing it. On the other hand, the refrain 'death for no reason is murder' is annoyingly (and uncharacteristically) stupid.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 11:23:05 GMT
Nugent Dirt says:
Odd thing taste. For me The Smiths are one of the most critically overpraised bands ever and yet Meat is the only one I found worth buying. And surely any album that has a tune as trite as Frankly Mr Shankly automatically loses 1 star.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Mar 2014 10:17:44 GMT
gille liath says:
Yeah, I took that as the remit too - not 'any 3 brilliant albums'.

Posted on 10 Mar 2014 10:16:17 GMT
gille liath says:
I don't think there are too many - most of the biggest artistes have had their going-through-the-motions albums. But I agree about the Smiths - although Meat Is Murder only just makes it - and I'd also say Roxy Music.

Fairport Convention - honestly? If you'd said pre-1970, maybe ;)...but I doubt if any band can carry on that long and every one still be a winner.
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Discussion in:  music discussion forum
Participants:  22
Total posts:  82
Initial post:  8 Mar 2014
Latest post:  12 Mar 2014

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