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What should I do with my CDs?


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Showing 151-175 of 361 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 09:59:31 BDT
Wow - Well I just completed "some" of your suggestions.
I've been banned from the library, swimming pool, bingo hall and
my friends and relatives think I've gone back in time; don't recognise who I am.
My neighbor thinks I'm having an affair with his wife, just cause i
kissed and hugged her this morning.
The council banned me from yuke playing outside local chipshop.
The big issue man thinks I'm crazy when I tried to give him 3000 for a magazine ; (the 600 cd's I have at home).
I listen to radio 4 anyway. I wrote to my friends, and they can't
understand why I keep repeating "Just a Minute" , Any Questions, Any answers.... etc
I wrote a poem to Carol Ann Duffy; she returned it with a comment about "please don't include my name in your prose". "I'am not like a fluffy flower" .
I subscribed to Wired magazine.
I used a website to send some postcards to relatives with photos I'd taken a while back.
I didn't pay for my meat at the supermarket, but I almost got caught with a cold turkey under my coat.
I've done a lot of research in local sports team, trouble is, I end up looking at a lot of schoolboys in their shorts, and the police may come knocking soon.
What shouuld I do about my cd's now; put them on ebay ? The charity shop said they already have enough Abba, Val Doonican and Cliff Richard cd's ? - Make some ashtrays out ofthem ?
Should I chuck out the pc and laptop and use internet cafes now; as i guess you are doing ?

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 10:07:32 BDT
Wow - Well I just completed "some" of your suggestions.
I've been banned from the library, swimming pool, bingo hall and
my friends and relatives think I've gone back in time; don't recognise who I am.
My neighbor thinks I'm having an affair with his wife, just cause i
kissed and hugged her this morning.
The council banned me from yuke playing outside local chipshop.
The big issue man thinks I'm crazy when I tried to give him 3000 for a magazine ; (the 600 cd's I have at home).
I listen to radio 4 anyway. I wrote to my friends, and they can't
understand why I keep repeating "Just a Minute" , Any Questions, Any answers.... etc
I wrote a poem to Carol Ann Duffy; she returned it with a comment about "please don't include my name in your prose". "I'am not like a fluffy flower" .
I subscribed to Wired magazine.
I used a website to send some postcards to relatives with photos I'd taken a while back.
I didn't pay for my meat at the supermarket, but I almost got caught with a cold turkey under my coat.
I've done a lot of research in local sports team, trouble is, I end up looking at a lot of schoolboys in their shorts, and the police may come knocking soon.
What shouuld I do about my cd's now; put them on ebay ? The charity shop said they already have enough Abba, Val Doonican and Cliff Richard cd's ? - Make some ashtrays out ofthem ?
Should I chuck out the pc and laptop and use internet cafes now; as i guess you are doing ?

Posted on 13 Jul 2012 10:24:00 BDT
CHEEZE says:
Good points Peter. I'm obviously slowwww, & stuck in the past, where i still get the thrill of playing a cd, like i used to with placing a LP,that i'd saved up to buy on the turntable.
Ah, those long ago school holidays,with lashings of ginger beer & sunshine!

In any case, we both agree that it would be foolish to get rid of the cds.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 10:36:47 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Jul 2012 10:38:09 BDT
CHEEZE says:
LOL. I'm so naive that i followed Mr Clarkes advice.

I now have no money or possessions!

Anybody want to buy The Big Issue?

Posted on 13 Jul 2012 11:09:29 BDT
Peter Lanky says:
Another advantage of the ripped album over the CD is for those many occasions when some divvi has decided that the tracks should be in a different order on a remaster or re-issue. A simple operation to put them back in the correct order.

Posted on 13 Jul 2012 13:15:16 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Jul 2012 13:16:17 BDT
music lover says:
even thought i said, in a earlier post that i regret getting rid of my cds, i would like to give some positive things about digital music..... one being if you don't like a full album of a singer/group you can download the song/s you like, and i have found new singers/groups that you don't normal find in mainstream rocord shops e.g euro singers.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 13:56:18 BDT
spanky says:
oh dear... we wouldnt want to commit such a terrible offence as that,would we now? :{

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2012 15:00:28 BDT
Gandolph says:
To clear things up if you rip a cd to hard drive and sell cd it is a breach of copyright as you no longer own ths original. However if it was downloaded and paid for that is different

Posted on 13 Jul 2012 22:49:58 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Jul 2012 23:31:13 BDT
Morgan Storm says:
I never play the CDs that I buy. I just collect them. CDs aren't just a medium but also merchandise and owning them is a sign of dedication to music.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jul 2012 10:33:38 BDT
yeah but thats the problem, people will just download the songs they like, neglecting the other songs. Many times i bought an album just for a few songs but ended up liking the other songs more. if people just download a few songs their missing out on the full thing and I'd imagine the artist missing out
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In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jul 2012 11:45:41 BDT
i agree, its not just the music its owning the album, an addition to a worthful collection. some people are just lazy and would rather just download it right there. a lot of times especially on Amazon downloading is actually dearer than buying the CD, that makes no sense. why would you pay more to download when you can buy the CD AND rip to your computer.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jul 2012 02:51:47 BDT
Last edited by the author on 15 Jul 2012 02:53:21 BDT
Morgan Storm says:
I almost always listen to whole albums. If someone can't make a whole album that is good to listen, then they aren't worth my time.
Generally, the whole model of partial listening is pretty awful. Especially stuff like 30 second samples on Amazon.
I'd be very hesitant to buy an album basing or a single song and I can't imagine buying a song or an album basing on a 30 second fragment. It's like buying a painting where 9/10 of the painting is hidden.
Not to mention that I usually base my decision to buy on pleasure derived from hearing the music. 30 second fragments aren't pleasurable, but obnoxious and frustrating.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jul 2012 03:39:36 BDT
Morgan Storm says:
I have never bought a mp3 file in my life. Something about buying a music files just feels wrong to me. Mainly, because to me, digital copies aren't the "real thing". I buy CDs and Vinyls (I don't even have a vinyl player) mainly to experience their "luxuriousness".

Nowadays I get music almost exclusively from various Netlabels, most of which host their releases on Internet Archive and from Jamendo. There's lots of good free music there (though Jamendo also has a lot of poor quality stuff) - I have about two hundred albums from there. Sadly, they often don't have a physical version.
Still it feels great to listen to album ten or more times and fall in love with it and discover that there's a CD/Vinyl available for purchase.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jul 2012 10:29:36 BDT
i agree, but with me its usually my favourite band which i know I'm gonna like. for example I just bought Napalm Death's album, The code is red..long live the code. Not heard any of the songs from that album but I'm a huge fan so guarenteed to like it, also its an addition to my collection.

I dont see why anyone would just want a couple of songs and thats it. Its like taking only a few chapters of a book and leaving the rest, you need the whole thing. Downloading just a handful of songs from an album just feels broken, unless you hated all songs but one or something, but then your not really a fan.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jul 2012 10:32:46 BDT
buying a CD or vinyl is the best way to buy music. its like owning the physical copy is the second part of your purchase other than the music itself, like a certificate that you own this album. Downloading just doesnt feel right. For metal anyway its best to buy the album because usually there is a lot of effort into the artwork and case, as well as lyrics in the booklet that comes with it etc.

I think digitial downloads are ok as an alternative but not as a replacement. If that every happens i will truly give up on modern society and live underground.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jul 2012 21:11:27 BDT
Last edited by the author on 15 Jul 2012 21:37:28 BDT
I keep all my 3000+ CDs but discard the jewel cases using iTune to rip AAC/MP4(an evolution that superseded MP3 in '92!) ; this saves SO much space and stops me violating copyright. Maplin (for eg.) sell boxes that store hundreds each, in segregated sleeves.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 02:25:42 BDT
Morgan Storm says:
When it comes to metal, I have noticed that good/great bands tend to burn out at some point and start to produce poor albums instead of disbanding. So, there's always risk of wasting money on something mediocre or outright bad, even if it's a favourite band.

Then there's unknown stuff where the first impression is something like "it's horrible, how anyone can like it" which one gets into after several listenings.

I think it's characteristic for pop albums where there are often 2-3 hit-songs and the rest is mediocre and unremarkable. I remember listening to the first Beyonce album and noticing that there are two-three very characteristic and rather erotic tracks that were made music videos of but the rest is horribly generic, unremarkable and sentimental. I saw something like that with the first Britney Spears album too.
Apparently pop composers can't into consistent character of albums and consistent quality.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 03:48:22 BDT
Morgan Storm says:
I don't think CDs will ever go away, unless they'll get completely replaced by vinyl. Even if they'll disappear from the mainstream, stuff like hand-numbered 66 copy limited series will probably stay forever.

By the way, I wonder why they don't sell DVD movies in CD boxes - especially gatefolds and digipacks, DVD boxes are rather vulgar and inelegant.

Posted on 16 Jul 2012 08:17:30 BDT
Peter Lanky says:
Morgan, I think that it's not simply that pop composers can't be consistent, but more likely that when they've produced a couple of hits, they consider that their job is done for that album and move on. Pop music is mainly about producing hits rather than producing music, so the consumer hears the hit (probably 5 times a day) on the radio, sees the video on the TV, which concentrates on the sexual characteristics or muscle content of the singer (depending on gender) rather than the sound and then possibly buys the album. Job done and money in the bank. The album will probably be played a couple of times and then off to the charity shop, or remain in the CD rack to be laughed at 10 years later when that artist is no longer cool and in fashion. From the writer's point of view they probably see little need to produce a dozen songs of hit potential on an album.

Posted on 16 Jul 2012 09:22:56 BDT
So if CD's fade away, and the concept of an album goes, the artists won't be saying . I'm working on a new album... Instead it will be , I'm working on a new single ! How feeble is that ?
I can't see the record companies embracing that in contracts.
We alreday have numerous one-hit wonders, who came and faded away, look out for a consistent bunch of them.... but then again, maybe not. Artists are having to rely on live music and concerts for their revenue stream. Long "live" the CD .
Find the space to buy,play and cherish your cd's. Churn the duplicates or less collectible ones.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 11:24:15 BDT
agree with peter lanky. Pop music isnt an artform, its simply a product. Someone said that pop music must be the best because its popular, but i told them its simple why, because of mass marketing. I wish more people could understand this and stop buying in to pop, making people like lady gaga millions

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 12:09:51 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
That's a pretty broad stroke your handing out chaos_preacher and I'd argue that it's simplistic and misinformed. There has long been a fantastic history of pop music pulling in everyone from Bob Dylan to Motorhead from folk to metal. The successful 3 minute single format (artform) has always been acknowledged by serious musicians as one of the hardest to achieve.
Give it a try sometime and let us know how you get on.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 12:36:18 BDT
Peter Lanky says:
MC Williams. That may well have been the case 30 years ago, but no longer. I recently watched a 1977 edition of Top of the Pops, and had forgotten just how wide a range of styles reached the singles chart. No longer so, now that the vast majority of pop music falls into about 3 different formulae none of which have any significant musical content or instrument virtuosity.

The term 'pop' has changed in meaning from being broadly anything that wasn't classical, to nowadays meaning a formulaic package which is derided by most who appreciate genuine music of any genre. The charts reflect this change.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 13:05:33 BDT
Last edited by the author on 16 Jul 2012 13:08:20 BDT
yeah i agree that in the 90s and before, pop music was well written and all about music. I meant to add that its modern mainstream music thats the problem. nowadays its a very different story. most music today is sexualized and they rely on this to make money, just watch the charts as they call it and its evident. When a big star today like justin bieber or gaga release a single its guarenteed to be no 1 or in the top 5. almost like its been programmed

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jul 2012 13:07:16 BDT
Last edited by the author on 16 Jul 2012 13:14:17 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
Peter, I still disagree. Pop music is not just chart music but includes many styles which are available under the tag of 'Pop music' right here on Amazon. As for the charts, could it be that it is full of music that has no interest to yourself rather than the integrity of the music? After all the chief target audience is 7 to 17.
Just off the top of my head I'd point both yourself and choas_preacher to Mumford & Son's The Cave & Little Lion Man; Goyte's Somebody That I Used To Know; Caro Emerald's That Man; Imelda May's Mayhem and Yolanda's We No Speak Americano all worldwide hits, all completely different, all self-penned and all done through the medium of touring, internet fans and good old-fashioned radio play.
As for it being formulaic these days Mmm...guess that never happened 30 years ago, oh apart from T. Rex; Status Quo; Brotherhood Of Man and the hundreds more like them.

"When a big star today like justin bieber or gaga release a single its guarenteed to be no 1 or in the top 5. almost like its been programmed"...................c'mon seriously it never used to be like that?!!!!!!! not like The Beatles; The Beach Boys; The Rolling Stones; Michael Jackson; George Michael; Every Tamla Motown record ever released.
Do you live in a bubble ;0)
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Discussion in:  mp3 discussion forum
Participants:  141
Total posts:  361
Initial post:  9 Apr 2012
Latest post:  1 Apr 2014

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