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Turn light off (Paperwhite)


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Showing 76-100 of 103 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 27 Jul 2013 09:47:17 BDT
Damaskcat says:
Then you would need to have an alternative light source in the room in order to read your Kindle - or anything else for that matter apart from a computer type screen.

Posted on 13 Aug 2013 08:26:14 BDT
Woody Wilson says:
Despite the number of the wasteful arguments brought up by some posters, I would also like to be able to turn off the light entirely. Light from the blue end of the spectrum affects your body's circadian rhythm and to be honest the Kindle Paperwhite's LED lights are downright ugly and uneven. Ability to turn the light off is not a 'feature', it is a basic function, that would not cost Amazon any more to implement (as for example, audio, keyboard or extra buttons would). One more setting on the slider would do it.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2013 08:39:35 BDT
Denis Powell says:
All you can do is contact Amazon and ask for this feature to be enabled in a future model. Any change implemented costs Amazon money, however, and if buyers started to contact Customer Services saying "When I turn my Paperwhite on I can't see any light. Is it broken?" then the cost might outweigh any benefits.

It's not just a matter of the cost of altering the device specifications but the impact that has in other areas. When the first Kindle appeared you could add your own pictures to the screensavers. I believe Amazon received a high number of requests for help as many people had difficulties doing it. The facility was removed from all subsequent models. That may have been a coincidence, of course, but it illustrates that what seems a straightforward and simple option may not, in fact, be so.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2013 08:55:03 BDT
Damaskcat says:
Considering how many people wanted a built in light on earlier models I can't see Amazon providing the ability to completely turn off the light. After all if people don't want a Kindle with a built in light they could always buy the basic model instead and save themselves some money!

Personally I prefer to buy a device which has the features I want rather than buy something and then try and get the makers to change the specifications.

Posted on 13 Aug 2013 10:12:32 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 24 Oct 2013 20:01:04 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2013 14:29:09 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Aug 2013 14:29:52 BDT
Talking of wasteful arguments, extrapolating irrelevant facts read on the internet upsets your body's sense of reality.

If you want something just say so. Do not try to support it with wild nonsensical assertions.

Just how would Amazon implement switching the light off?

Of course, you could just not use a Paperwhite.
In daylight you don't need a light so that wouldn't affect your nonsense. In the dark you will need a light which, of course, will affect them. So, your own logic defeats the point.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2013 14:59:27 BDT
Erik Linde says:
"Just how would Amazon implement switching the light off?"
- By changing one (or a few) lines of code in their firmware and shipping it with their next firmware update (provided essercizi's previous answer holds true).

"If you want something just say so"
- Uhm, isn't that what we have been doing on this forum for the past couple of weeks?

"irrelevant facts read on the internet"
- How do you know that those facts were read on the internet? Also, if they indeed are "facts", what's there to dispute? A fact is a fact! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fact

Posted on 13 Aug 2013 15:06:04 BDT
Fi esta says:
All together now!)

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2013 16:58:17 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Aug 2013 16:59:32 BDT
Ask without rsort to mumbo jumbo to justify it.

Yes it's a fact. Is it a relevant fact? No, it certainly isn't. Did Wiki also tell you how much exposure you require? Have you applied that fact to the real world.

p.s. fact - caffeine is a diuretic. If you drink tea or coffee you will die as your body will excrete all the water in it.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Sep 2013 17:53:28 BDT
Chris says:
you need to be careful not to think binary...
just because i want a kindle with a light, doesn't mean I want it to be ALWAYS illuminated.

In respect of the impact to Amazon, it could either be hardware or software. judging by the comment made about a hack being available, i suspect it's software. A company cannot incorporate software releases into it's build schedule (either firmware releases, if there is such a thing for kindle, or new models) unless people tell them about the problem. And the strange argument about "compromise" (from a poster before) is a bit counter-intuitive - hardware and software development comes with compromise, yes, but there would usually be a reason for not including a feature... the buttons thing is a biggie - you're changing the overall construction of the device, changing a little bit of software is a different issue. If companies only sent out their product once, and never incorporated feedback because they wanted to maximise profit in one area, they'd very soon stop making any profit.

Personally, i wanted to be able to read at night, I can do that. I find it annoying that the light is always on, so I would like to press minus one more time and have it turn off. This may be due to my perception that it uses more electricity, thus reducing the longevity of the battery charge.

On the plus side, in reading this thread, I have found a new set of light bulbs that might rid me of SAD this year round, so thanks whoever posted it...

Posted on 17 Sep 2013 10:03:19 BDT
Hmm. What the heck. Why does it hurt for You, if I want to turn off the light when I want to. I did have a Kindle keyboard, and loved it. Kindle paperwhite with the light on feels wrong in well lit conditions. Different. I just want to turn off the light then.
And in the dark I like it lit.
Period. Where is the place I can write to Amazon about it?

Posted on 17 Sep 2013 10:12:06 BDT
Ian Craig says:
I find the light really useful, although if you have it turned up very high, I start to see coloured patches. However, turning it down, the patches melt away and the screen starts to look a little more evenly lit overall.

I'm hoping that the new one is as the first one should have been - more even.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 10:17:56 BDT
Damaskcat says:
The light turns down virtually to zero - to the extent that if you compare it with the Kindle Touch for example the difference is negligible in my opinion.

If I didn't want a light at all I would buy the basic Kindle rather than say Amazon should make changes to something which is perfectly fine for the majority.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 10:18:57 BDT
Damaskcat says:
Strange - I turn the light up in well lit conditions and down in ill lit conditions but each to their own.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 11:35:48 BDT
Denis Powell says:
Gabor, in my experience, having the light quite high in bright conditions gives a whiter screen with better contrast but if you want Amazon to bring out a device where you can turn the light off you need to use the feedback email address. kindle-feedback@amazon.co.uk

If you've kept the Welcome Letter that came pre-loaded on your Paperwhite you'll find the address given there if you forget it.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 14:49:47 BDT
Sharon4 says:
I had that experience as well, with a replacement that Amazon sent me when my original device, from Waterstones started playing up. The original's screen was as near perfect as these things get, while the replacement was mottled looking, with a patch of uneven light near the bottom as if one of the internal lights had been knocked out of place. Back it went and I persisted with the original till it kicked off again - long, boring story and Amazon have now sent me what I hope will be the last one for a couple of years. The screen is very nice and it has no problems with its software as far as I can tell.

Something else that may be significant (and this is a general comment, which may not apply to anyone else) is that I got new reading glasses this morning and the quality of the font on my Kindle looks blacker and crisper than it did with the old ones. The problem with the screen on the first replacement was real, but probably more noticeable because I was struggling anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 22:50:08 BDT
Ask Amazon

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Sep 2013 22:51:28 BDT
Cleaning the screen got rid of the coloured patches for me.

Posted on 18 Sep 2013 18:07:46 BDT
Ian Craig says:
Do you think the pressure on the screen eliminated it?

I'm hoping the new one is a little more even than my current one. It's a minor thing but they kind of made me feel let down after the original hype about 'even' lighting.

Let's hope the new version isn't hyped as well but I'm not holding my breath!!

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Sep 2013 19:24:53 BDT
No pressure. Just cleaned it. Pressure breaks things.

Posted on 24 Oct 2013 17:10:50 BDT
Thanks everyone for the answers. I actually found a way:
http://www.amazon.com/forum/kindle?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx1D7SY3BVSESG&cdThread=Tx1FANHTNZEWE7A
There is also an another way discussed in Mobileread, but that neads jailbreaking.

Gabor

Posted on 6 Jan 2014 22:42:26 GMT
Sue says:
I was under the impression that Kindle had a non-backlit screen because it as better for your eyes. I've got a computer, a laptop and an iPad and I love all of them but I bought the kindle because I work on a computer all day and I wanted to give my eyes a rest while reading on my kindle. I didn't want to read on my iPad for the same reason. I love the technology but if I can't turn the light off I might as well have stuck with the iPad.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Jan 2014 22:50:12 GMT
Last edited by the author on 7 Jan 2014 09:46:59 GMT
Denis Powell says:
The Paperwhite does not have a back-lit screen. The light shines on it from the front of the screen and is reflected back, just like daylight reflects back.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Jan 2014 23:09:49 GMT
Sharon4 says:
I agree with you about backlit screens. I don't find them ideal for lengthy reading either. However, the light on a Paperwhite is very different to that on an iPad; it's more diffuse, and easier on the eyes regardless of lighting conditions. I was very attached to my Kindle Keyboard (which didn't have a light) and wasn't at all sure if I'd get used to a lit screen, but my reading vision was just going from dismal to appalling, so I decided to try it. I'm pleased I did. I like to have lots of natural light to read by, but you can't guarantee that in the UK, especially in winter. The Paperwhite's light comes fairly close to replicating it which makes reading less of a strain on my eyes.

Posted on 18 Jan 2014 01:49:07 GMT
Not being funny, but I've had my paper white for nearly a year now, I'm lying in bed in the dark trying to get to sleep and I've just rolled over and thought "what the hell is that glow" to then realize my kindle has turned itself on or something, no problem, just weird. Until I press the button to turn it off, like totally switch the power off.
Yeah. It's still glowing even though it's "off" and I keep turning it on, logging it in and then turning it off and it's still freakin glowing. I had to put the light down to 1 so I can actually sleep, and now I'm dreading having to get a replacement :/
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Discussion in:  kindle discussion forum
Participants:  38
Total posts:  103
Initial post:  26 Dec 2012
Latest post:  26 Apr 2014

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