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The Most Annoying Things Disc Producers Do


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Initial post: 21 Apr 2012 18:14:49 BDT
I. E. THOMAS says:
Doesn't it make you mad when you sit down to watch a nice new DVD or Blu-ray, but instead of being allowed to watch the film you paid good money for, you are FORCED to endure several noisey, frantic trailers for the latest juvenile CGI comic book violent trash put out by the Studio. You can't even go direct to the menu or fast forward - my player often says "prohibited" (sez who ?). Occasionally several prods at the skip button will reveal the start menu - surely the proper place for trailers is in the Extras Dept ? Even worse were those revolting and completely ear shattering anti-Piracy things.
Talking of noise - the most obnoxious Studio Logo is the Studio Canal Nightmare Affair which will have the neighbours knocking on the wall as it is about three times louder than the film you have paid to watch. It also appears before the menu and then again before the Film. I object to this, as in most cases Studio Canal have had nothing to do with making the film - they just bought the Library. Particularly in the case of the old Rank Titles - the Man with the Gong is all we need !
Turning now to the Box - Blu-ray packaging gives even less space for information, so why does every Actor have a selection of other films they have appeared in appended to their name ? We all know that !
Also, even with a powerful magnifying glass, you cannot decipher all the cast list etc - why not print this on the back of the label so that it can be read through the transparent box when you eventually manage to remove the plastic film wrapping ?
There must be loads of other thing that get you going - what about specific examples of offending titles !

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Apr 2012 18:52:10 BDT
To get through all the "forced upon us trailers", I found that I can do 3 things. First I try the skip to next chapter button, which doesn't always work but when it does you only have to endure the first few seconds of each trailer. Second, just use the fast forward button, preferably at 16X, which can be easier than the first option when it zips you through all the trailers at once. My third suggestion is just do something else while these trailers play. Go to the john, get your self a beverage or if you're already settled in, just switch to TV and watch some news or whatever while the BS on your blu-ray passes. I've given up on stressing over this crap, however every once in a while I am surprised to get a DVD or blu-ray with no trailers, nothing but the movie, very little extras. This usually happens with a new release of an older film that has long ago made its money, so it's just a cash grab by the studio. The only good thing about these blu-rays is they seem to know once you've watched the trailers and won't make you watch them a second time if you replay the disc. Perhaps that just happens to me when I fall asleep during a film and have to watch the rest of it the next day, so the disc has stayed in the player. Just wait for the next generation Blu-rays, they will automatically link you to the studios website for new trailers every time you play a disc.

Posted on 23 Nov 2012 19:57:52 GMT
Barnacles says:
I think they should only add the anti-piracy warning to illegal copies.

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 09:56:52 GMT
C. Gould says:
That made me chuckle. Well played sir.

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 14:28:19 GMT
I. E. THOMAS says:
Barnacles and C. Gould (Sage of the Postings - are you in the trade as you have made many insider-style comments?) - thankyou both for commenting on this subject which I started way back in April. Since then, the "Logo from Hell" by Studio Canal has at last been changed to something more soothing. I just obtained their BD of It Always Rains on Sunday and it started with a 2.35 Scope Logo in colour on this 1.33 Acadamy B&W Classic but at least it didn't rattle the windows !

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 15:52:57 GMT
C. Gould says:
I've run a DVD/BD news/reviews site for over a decade, so I talk to a lot of distributors and their PR reps. SC's new logo is actually quite soothing. The old one looked/sounded like it was made by kids with its silly sound effects that were, as you rightly said, almost always twice as loud as anything else on the disc.

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 15:58:15 GMT
Last edited by the author on 29 Nov 2012 15:59:13 GMT
J.Yasimoto says:
It's annoying when you always have to select a country for subtitles - even though, in 95% of cases, subtitles aren't used.

As for cases, I hate fragile spindles that break, discs arriving in the post that aren't on a spindle (and getting the dreaded rattling sound when you pick them up), and boxsets that have overlapping discs.

And while I'm here, I once received a DVD where the writing on the spine ran from bottom to top instead of top to bottom. Made me froth. Not sure what film it was but definitely by Artificial Eye. Maybe Winter's Bone.

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 16:33:39 GMT
C. Gould says:
I believe that's the menu language/personalisation you're selecting there, not subtitles.

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 19:12:07 GMT
Nat Whilk says:
Just a few...

1) Issuing very expensive box sets containing discs which all have to be replaced because of mastering errors.

2) Cropping 2:40 movies to 16X9.

3) Issuing a movie with a theatrical cut when an extended director's cut is available on DVD.

4) Issuing a UK disc without the extras on the US version.

5) Not using 1080p or DTS HD Master Audio.

6) Putting the disc in a holder that grips the thing so tightly that you're frightened of breaking it when you get it out.

7) Region coding.

8) Giving us superfluous DVD copies whether we want them or not.

But when all's said and done, and every last moan moaned, I like to remember a photograph in the biography of Peter Jackson which shows the young Peter proudly taking possession of a copy of his favourite film, the original King Kong, in the only format then available - a stack of half a dozen or so reels of 8mm celluloid. All of us who love home cinema are so very, very lucky to have lived long enough to see BD - we've reached home cinema paradise!

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 19:22:40 GMT
Freaky says:
Why would I say anything when this captures it all: http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/342/728w.jpg

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Nov 2012 19:24:56 GMT
Freaky says:
[quote]All of us who love home cinema are so very, very lucky to have lived long enough to see BD - we've reached home cinema paradise! [/quote]

Does your world consist of 60+ only? My kids were born into it...

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Nov 2012 20:55:49 GMT
Nat Whilk says:
Good point, Freaky. Not being a parent myself, I tend to forget that technologies that to me approach the miraculous are to a child no more remarkable than a biro. This said, I wonder whether we'd enjoy our tech more if we sometimes imagined how it would seem to our predecessors? Looking over my shoulder is a photo of one of my great-grandfathers, whose most advanced piece of kit was a wind-up gramophone on which he used to listen to 78s of his favourite arias. Occasionally when I'm starting up an opera video, I like to picture what the expression on his face would be if he could watch my DVD with me!

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 21:21:39 GMT
Freaky says:
I think so. Jim Jefferies said it nicely in Alcoholocaust in the part where he compares our (1st class countries) suicide rates with Africa's. Unfortunately forum guidelines don't allow me to quote him hehe :).

Perhaps we should make living in Africa or some other hell-hole for 2-3 months mandatory for every citizen. You'd surely appreciate the luxury here a lot more.

Posted on 3 Dec 2012 07:14:49 GMT
Neal Vincent says:
Nat Whilk says: "2) Cropping 2:40 movies to 16X9."

Cropping 1.85 movies to 16x9 is bad enough! And there's a lot of that going on, e.g. every Warner Bros Blu-ray of a 1.85:1 film. Hate it when they do that...

Leave the damn aspect ratio alone, publishers... The film's director and cinematographer chose the aspect ratio they wanted, and it's an insult to the film whenever a publisher takes it upon themselves to re-frame a work of art to fit whatever shape TVs happen to be at the time.

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Dec 2012 14:48:24 GMT
J.Yasimoto says:
"I believe that's the menu language/personalisation you're selecting there, not subtitles."

No - it's the subtitles I'm thinking of. Have a look at the recently released Safe House for an example. It's a small problem sure, but for those of us who stick a disc in, then go and get tea and biscuits expecting to come back to the "Play" option ready to go, it's a little frustrating.

Posted on 4 Dec 2012 02:29:26 GMT
MadusMaximus says:
Someone else already mentioned it, but the stupidly tight disc holders that make you think you're going to snap the damn thing by removing it. And of course, the anti-piracy crap. We know already, you shouldn't pirate things, yet the pirates don't see these things because they're stripped clean of all this guff!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2012 12:28:37 GMT
C. Gould says:
I don't have Safe House, but I've never seen a disc where you have to explicitly select the surtitles before the start of the film. Some discs (Paramount's for example) ask you to select a language before the menu appears, but that's usually overridden by the subtitle setting in your player. At least it is on the players I've used.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2012 12:30:49 GMT
C. Gould says:
Not to get in the way of your rant, but the vast majority of discs presented at 1.78:1 (16x9) on BD are actually opened up from 1.85:1, not cropped. Certainly most Warner BDs are. You're actually seeing slightly more of the image, although the difference between those two ratios is negligible. It actually helps with sets that overscan as well.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Dec 2012 00:57:31 GMT
MadusMaximus says:
Technically speaking, there should be no over-scanning or similar things going on with Blu-rays as the full frame of the video is always 16:9, the content is just presented in whatever aspect ratio it's supposed to be in within that frame, if that makes sense. A 4:3 for example will show the side bars, but as far as the actual video file is concerned it's still 1920 x 1080. Some players and software can detect the bars on the sides and/or top/bottom and mask them out, but as far as the picture goes, on the disc itself the file is always a 1920 x 1080 frame.

I'm not sure how well I explained that so I hope it makes sense lol.

Of course, this ignores purposely changing the ratio for the release as you mentioned.

Posted on 8 Dec 2012 02:36:20 GMT
ZZrider says:
Here's my short list.

1) Ads, I thought when I bought mu first Blue-ray that the menu would finally load fast.
2) Bad menu screens, so small you have to stand a foot away from your TV to read them. The menu has only images instead of descriptions. Some are like puzzles.
3) Bad box set design, some are non user friendly, stacked discs and cardboard sleeves.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Dec 2012 07:11:00 GMT
J.Yasimoto says:
"Technically speaking, there should be no over-scanning or similar things going on with Blu-rays"

It's a setting on your TV. Lots of TVs are shipped with Overscan On by default (my Panasonic was). The TV takes your 1920x1080 frame, chops a bit off the edges, then blows up the remainder to refill the 1920x1080 pixels on the screen.

Of course, for anyone watching BluRay, Overscan should be set to Off.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Dec 2012 13:41:44 GMT
C. Gould says:
I'm well aware of BD's specs and how material is encoded, but technically you're forgetting that there are thousands of people who own 720p sets ;) You can't 1:1 pixel map on those, so they have to be scaled and they usually overscan. A lot of 1080p sets don't automatically engage 1:1 mapping either (Toshiba's don't).

The overscan comment is a red herring anyway; I only made it to illustrate the point that the difference between 1.78:1 and 1.85:1 is so minor it's hardly worth mentioning, and that it could be a benefit in some circumstances. Don't think my sense of humour translates very well over the web.

Posted on 17 Dec 2012 19:47:18 GMT
Last edited by the author on 17 Dec 2012 19:47:39 GMT
the worst thing they do is put out a movie that is scratched and damaged or faded.

Posted on 14 Jan 2013 07:25:40 GMT
The habit of the BBC issuing season 1 in HD and season 2 etc in SD for example Hotel Babylon. Again the BBC issuing a region A series in HD but not one for region B for example The Hour series 2 and Call the midwife. Also the George Gently series 1 and 3 are availsble as region A HD but series 2 is only SD. Why the BBC engages in these silly games who can tell but I would have thought the BD sales for these series in the UK would be significant. The best thing to to would be to remove region coding so everyone can watch the series they wish to in HD. This is especialy true for Australia as the ABC shows most of the BBC series which are transmitted in SD only as the ABC uses it 720p HD service for a very poor 24hr news service.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jan 2013 11:00:45 GMT
C. Gould says:
I would imagine a lot of that is down to poor sales for the BD release of the first series. It's happened with a few titles I can think of, not just from the BBC. Of course it's also happened in reverse, with Archer Season 1 only getting a DVD release over here and subsequent seasons arriving on BD.
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Participants:  16
Total posts:  41
Initial post:  21 Apr 2012
Latest post:  22 Aug 2013

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