Customer Discussions > headphones discussion forum

wireless headphones


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-21 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 24 Apr 2012 15:35:11 BDT
freeder says:
i have 2 sets of SONY WIRELESS HEADPHONES MODEL MDR-RF-800RK. when using just with the TVthey work fine, but listening to them through the tv connected to a digital recorder they cut out within 4 minutes . any help would be appriciated

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Jul 2012 14:01:56 BDT
pattiesgame says:
I bought 2 sets of wireless headphones and when I hear the TV the picture goes fuzzy..I wish you luck

Posted on 18 Jul 2012 17:08:00 BDT
I need headphones for my mum who is hard of hearing so she can watch and hear the tv without the whole nieghbourhood hearing it aswell. Can anyone tell me if I need to get wireless headphones or wired, I am really at a loss to what is best.

Posted on 18 Jul 2012 17:10:32 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 18 Jul 2012 17:10:51 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jul 2012 23:16:35 BDT
Brass Neck says:
How old is your mum? Is she used to wearing headphones? If not she could well get up and jerk the phones or fall over the cord if they were wired. Does anyone live with her, if so make sure the headphones are CLOSED rather than open which will reduce the sound leakage. I prefer wired headphones but my hearing's fine. I have a pair of AKG wireless phones which sometimes develop a faint buzz due to interference from metal parts, etc in the construction of the house necessitating moving the head a few cm into slightly awkward positions - I suspect your mum's loss of hearing will render this issue null and void. There's a powered transmitter/charger to take into account and your mum would need to understand that she has to regularly charge them up.

So, what to buy? I'd swear by Sennheiser though I've never owned any wireless models (I have owned and had problems with Sony and the much better but rarer AKGs tend to be pricey) so depending on budget;

Sennheiser RS110 RF Wireless Headphone are the cheapest but are open backed and apparently you have to buy your own rechargeable batteries!

Sennheiser RS 170 Closed Digital Wireless Over-Ear Headphone are way more expensive but are closed backed and ought to be much better sound quality

Otherwise you could go for some Bluetooth phones but you'd need a dongle to plug into the device from which the sound is to be delivered.

Posted on 15 Aug 2012 16:17:05 BDT
lenno says:
Sennheiser si410 are expensive (142£) but excellent wh en used with tv

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 11:55:29 BDT
Trigger says:
Wireless is handy if the TV is far from the usual chair you mum sits in, you could consider the Sennheiser RS 120 wireless headphones in this case. If she doesnt sit too far from the TV, within three meters, and she is alone in the room them a wirel paur might suit better as they can be left plugged in. The HD 65 TV would be best here with individual volume control.

Hope this helps?

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Aug 2012 15:48:38 BDT
Brass Neck says:
Another solution would be to get one of these - Sennheiser HZR62 Stereo Volume Control - it is in fact a very good 5.2 m extension cable and I have one cos my hi-fi's in a different room to where I sit and listen. It could then be run under the edge of the carpet from the telly to the chair where she sits and then you could use any choice of wired headphones you like and the old gal won't be tripping over it.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Aug 2012 12:08:33 BDT
I purchased Philips SHC8545 cordless headphones to use with my PC and Xbox and they are fantastic. All you need to do is plug the charging unit/headphone rest into the device you want to listen to, you can then listen wirelessly. I often listen to music from my PC in the livingroom and can walk into another room and still hear the music through the headphones perfectly. They also have an excellant customer service. I hope this helps.

Posted on 18 Sep 2012 17:28:39 BDT
https://dealcloud.co.uk/National/-9-for-iLeaf-noise-cancelling-earphones-value-30-/169008

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Oct 2012 22:28:16 BDT
bunnyman says:
I have mainly wired and I too am a big fan of Sennheiser-and I also live in a flat -but recently I bought a pair of Sennheiser RS 170 Digital wireless phones and they are superb. A little expensive maybe but worth it in my opinion for the sheer quality. Once the charger/transmitter is plugged into the TV headphone socket I can walk round cooking a meal or go into the bedroom and lie on the bed whilst listening to cd played on the DVD player connected to the TV.Great'
bunnarooney

Posted on 16 Oct 2012 19:09:12 BDT
PeterB says:
I bought some cheap £29.99 cordless stereo headphones from Lidl. SilverCrest SFR 2.4 A1. They work without problems. They come with a built in lithium battery and a cradle charger to recharge the battery. They also come with a built in FM radio, different size stereo jacks and other accessories. You can even insert a rechargeable AAA battery if the inbuilt lithium packs up. I am hard of hearing so these headphones are a boon. I now hear background stereo that was, for me, missing before. I use them most evenings. There is no need to pay a high price if all you want is to be able to hear without deafening others.

Posted on 2 Nov 2012 12:25:30 GMT
Angela says:
A well known small catalogue supplier sells headphones for about £14 that are like an mp3 player with in-ear phones, the best I have seen having a neck cord and sound level adjuster. This would also be handy as a back up for hearing aid wearers.

Posted on 26 Jan 2013 21:13:17 GMT
mariebmoore says:
I found the comment about an older woman 'the old girl' offensive' At nearly 80 I can still take offensive! Do moderate your language please Marie

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Feb 2013 12:02:43 GMT
I am hard of hearing and have the Sennheisers 120. They are good for me and have kept our marriage stable as I can control the volume (my wife has the hearing of a border collie) I recommend wireless headphones

Posted on 24 Aug 2014 22:27:02 BDT
em yt says:
Thinking of buying sennheiser rs 170 headphones , but on the back of my tv, it only has an 'in' connection, not 'out'. Dont want to use 'headphone jack' on tv because of other people watching, is there anything i could buy to solve this problem, it would be much appreciated. Michael.

Posted on 25 Sep 2014 11:05:28 BDT
Wired headphones give the best sound as wireless headphones 'compress' the audio which reduces some of the clarity.
Depends on your mothers hearing loss, wireless headphones may be acceptable but wired will give the best sound possible.
If you have a digital audio output on your TV (Optical or coaxial) Redwhizz supply a unit which uses this output and supplies amplified sound to your headphones.
The headphones require an in-lead volume control which allows the volume to be controlled as levels change - i.e turn it up for film speech and down for adverts.

Posted on 3 Dec 2014 03:45:07 GMT
Last edited by the author on 3 Dec 2014 03:46:24 GMT
Anna Waters says:
I have just bought a celcus t.v. from Sainsburys (their own brand) and have just found my head phones only work without all 'round sound so the volume disappears for others watching the t.v. as I'm hard of hearing I would be absolutely lost without my headphones. Can anyone offer a solution other than bringing the t.v. back to Sainsburys? Thanks

Posted on 3 Dec 2014 21:33:10 GMT
Last edited by the author on 4 Dec 2014 13:38:06 GMT
Hi Anna
I have looked at the Remington Celcus 40" specification and you have an 'Optical Audio Output' which you can use for headphones without cutting out sound to the normal speaker. Redwhizz have a unit called the Digi-Whizz which uses the Optical Audio Output for an amplified level for headphones. As this was designed for the hard of hearing the sound is at a loud and clear level.
If you search for Digi-whizz they are available through Amazon or from the Redwhizz website.

You can purchase just the unit which is supplied with all cables or the unit with Panasonic headphones and a 3 meter extension lead. The headphones have a 3meter lead and in-lead volume control so you can adjust the volume for different program levels.

Best Regards
Peter

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Feb 2015 15:30:07 GMT
Mark T says:
Hi Anna. I believe you will find that most devices with the option to plug in headphones will cut off the speakers. You might have a word with an electrical to see if it's possible for them to fit an accessible switch that would enable you to select the TV's speaker(s) mute or not when you have headphones plugged in. Any such work would probably invalidate the TV manufacture's warranty though.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Feb 2015 16:11:12 GMT
Hi Mark

You are right there are only a few TV's that allow the speakers and headphones to be used together.
This is due to the extra cost of components which increases the final cost of the TV, as the majority of users will only use either headphones 'or' the speakers the cost is not always justified.
Unfortunately this does not help the hard of hearing, but you can use the 'Digital Audio Optical Output' and a converter which will allow the speakers and headphones to be used together.

Regards
Peter
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the headphones discussion forum (30 discussions)

More Customer Discussions

Most active community forums
Most active product forums

Amazon forums
 

This discussion

Participants:  17
Total posts:  21
Initial post:  24 Apr 2012
Latest post:  7 Feb 2015

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 6 customers

Search Customer Discussions