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Books about the end of the world type stories, any suggestions?


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Initial post: 2 Jul 2012 21:47:59 BDT
C. Thomas says:
Looking for this type of story, doing a little research, nuclear holocaust, that type of thing, no film based material as have most of that covered. Thanks for any suggestions. Cheers in advance.

Posted on 2 Jul 2012 22:50:02 BDT
Dan Holloway says:
The classic is Neville Shute's On the Beach, though that was made into a film. There's a selection of postapocalyptic manga you can browse at http://www.anime-planet.com/tags/post-apocalyptic/manga - as a format that may well be worth looking at

Posted on 3 Jul 2012 11:49:41 BDT
The Passage by Justin Cronin - the end of civilization due to a virus which turns all humans into vampire-like creatures. It's a fantastic read, and the follow up is out later this year. And although I didn't get very far reading it, I believe The Gone-Away World by Nick Harkaway is also very good. I intend to try it again when I am feeling less fickle!
I have downloaded a YA book Pure by Julianna Baggott which is about a post-nuclear fall out where some people live under a dome and were saved from the effects of the war, and where the rest live in the tainted planet outside the dome. Sounds like a mixture of the other two, and I look forward to reading it.

Posted on 3 Jul 2012 16:02:21 BDT
Last edited by the author on 3 Jul 2012 16:10:13 BDT
Chris says:
Earth Abides is a pretty good read, though the author's apparent attitude towards disability is pretty hard to stomach. The Road is quite good. The Postman is fairly well regarded. I enjoyed James Herbert's '48.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 08:53:03 BDT
I Readalot says:
Karen - There are quite a few quality YA books around at the moment that cover this ground, I enjoyed Pure and look forward the to next in the series. Also The Maze Runner trilogy - James Dashner is worth reading as well as The Killables - Gemma Malley. As you would expect I would definitely recommend The Gone Away World.

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 10:12:04 BDT
Last edited by the author on 4 Jul 2012 10:14:23 BDT
AntCity says:
Knocking on a bit but John Wyndham's The Chrysalids; John Christopher's The Death of Grass and J G Ballard's The Drowned World grabbed my teenagers' attention. And don't forget Lord of the Flies.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 11:48:40 BDT
After seeing you mention the Maze Runner books on another thread, I have had a look and I have added them to my wishlist. I haven't heard of The Killables, I will take a look.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 13:30:50 BDT
I Readalot says:
I actually preferred Maze Runner to Hunger Games, very twisted plot and just when you think you know what is going on .......

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 15:48:45 BDT
S. A. Aldred says:
The Rapture by Liz Jensen -brilliant -the haze between psychotic delusion and authentic premonition is frustratingly captured . Suspenseful,psychological thrill that leaves you guessing through to the ,literally ,final page.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 15:49:03 BDT
S. A. Aldred says:
The Rapture by Liz Jensen -brilliant -the haze between psychotic delusion and authentic premonition is frustratingly captured . Suspenseful,psychological thrill that leaves you guessing through to the ,literally ,final page.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 16:41:05 BDT
Ooh - I loved the Hunger Games, so that makes me want to bump them up my reading list! I am trying to only buy Kindle books as I am about to move and it's going to be hard enough packing the books that I have (my OH is going to have a fit when he sees how many I have accummulated!), but they aren't available on Kindle. I may have to make an exception...

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 16:58:28 BDT
Don't forget "When the Wind Blows" by Raymond Briggs,capturing so well the times,not so long ago when we all knew the bomb was going to drop,and when the government issued educational material for every household about how to build a shelter in your house .And definitely On The Beach

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 19:19:11 BDT
Simon says:
The Fire of Babylon (Solstice12)

This one is part of a series leading up to the end of the world in December 2012 - brilliant and cheap enough to take a punt on.
Si

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 19:36:40 BDT
Anita says:
Hmmmm... my bad suspicious self awake and sniffing around :)

The book Si mentions - and plugs in 4 threads - has 4 reviews, and NO reviewer of those 4 have reviewed a book in their lifes before! What a wonderful book it must be to make FOUR *unrelated* people start reading and reviewing!

Any votes for spam?

For experiment's sake I'll try spamming the same threads with this very same reply :)

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 19:59:51 BDT
Oracle says:
Is this the only book you've ever read, Si?

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:11:24 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
Might possibly be the only one he (she?) has written?

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 22:18:48 BDT
Chris says:
I just wanted to say that thanks to this thread I'm part of the way through On the Beach. What's been most interesting to me is the fact that it's the only book of this type that has actually made me feel bad about all the people that have died, and are going to die. All the other's I've read seem in some way to be kind of revelling in the absence of society, and the freedom it brings. You know, the fun of looting and rooting.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:31:34 BDT
Oracle says:
You've not read The Road then? It certainly doesn't revel in anything except misery...

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:37:19 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
There's a good degree of humanity and compassion in much of Neville Shute's work; he regularly explored how ordinary people coped in extraordinary circumstances. He was a good (as opposed to great) writer but he was very astute in tapping into issues/dilemmas that concerned people when he was writing. "On The Beach" appeared in the 1950s; the memories of the first atomic bombs were still fresh in people's minds and there was a real fear that we were heading towards complete nuclear annihilation.

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 22:39:43 BDT
I am Legend is a fantastic end-of-the-world-with-vampires novel. As long as you haven't seen the film which Hollywoods-up the ending.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:40:10 BDT
C. Thomas says:
The postman, movie based on it right, never trust the film but the concept was good i.e. omega man/I am legend. might check that one out. Thanks

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:43:51 BDT
C. Thomas says:
Thanks Karen, Gone away world had some lovely reviews and it sounded quite a entertaining read, not what I was aiming for as such but got it anyhow. Thanks for the tip x

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 22:45:39 BDT
It was written in the seventies, but you'd never know it.
I'm bookmarking this thread - loads of great recommendations!

Posted on 4 Jul 2012 22:51:13 BDT
C. Thomas says:
Chucking one into the mix of fantastic replies which I really appreciate from everyone. An old read from Brian Aldiss. Hothouse (Penguin Modern Classics) Read this when I was quite young and it really sparked a love of Science fiction.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 22:55:21 BDT
C. Thomas says:
Not read it, Omega man was a better ending for me film wise i think. Thanks Shalini. Hell i'm going to bill my client for all of these books..... Thanks again
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
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Initial post:  2 Jul 2012
Latest post:  17 Jul 2012

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