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novels that take place in cold climates


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Initial post: 12 Nov 2012 23:33:40 GMT
Last edited by the author on 12 Nov 2012 23:36:10 GMT
I have a penchant for stories/novels whose settings are Alaska, The Arctic, Canada, etc. I have so far read The Snow Child, Dark Matter: A Ghost Story, Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow, The Shipping News, A Simple Plan and The Tenderness of Wolves. And I loved them all. Do you have any recommendations?

Posted on 12 Nov 2012 23:46:44 GMT
I Readalot says:
If you like crime fiction there are all the Norics, Jo Nesbo, Arnaldur Indridason, Henning Mankell, Johan Theorin, Karin Fossum, Karin Alvtegen, to name but a few.

Posted on 12 Nov 2012 23:55:43 GMT
Anita says:
I feel a little bit weird with this recommendation as just too obvious, but whatever

Call of the Wild & White Fang (Wordsworth Classics): AND White Fang

Not sure if I should recommend this, but cold climate it is...

Atlantis Found: The Dirk Pitt Adventures #15

Posted on 13 Nov 2012 07:49:08 GMT
Thanks readalot and anita. :)
I love crime fiction and often read Nordic writers like Nesbo. I'll try the other names you've mentioned.
Call of the Wild and White Fang were my childhood favorites and I devoured each probably 4-5 times. Yet, I might read them again - it's been more than 30 years after all.
I'll check out Atlantis - sounds interesting.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Nov 2012 10:21:11 GMT
I Readalot says:
In that case here's another couple Hakan Nesser and Yrsa Sigurdardottir, like Indridason she is Icelandic, the 4th novel in her Thora Gudmundsdottir series is mainly set in Greenland.

Posted on 13 Nov 2012 10:24:18 GMT
Fiona Hurley says:
Margaret Elphinstone's The Sea Road, set in Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland in the Viking era.

Posted on 13 Nov 2012 11:46:59 GMT
thanks for your recommendations.
Thora Gudmundsdottir series, and especially the sea road seem like just my cup of tea!

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Nov 2012 12:25:22 GMT
I Readalot says:
I find that the Thora Gudmundsdottir series makes a pleasent change from the testosterone fuelled crime and for once the protagonist is not a police officer or PI.

Posted on 14 Nov 2012 08:41:50 GMT
monica says:
Cold Earth--Greenland, though much of it takes place in summer.

Posted on 14 Nov 2012 10:02:37 GMT
cold earth seems to be quite similar to dark matter. I'll certainly read it. thanks.

Posted on 14 Nov 2012 21:15:32 GMT
Last edited by the author on 14 Nov 2012 22:07:18 GMT
monica says:
Yeah--although the resemblance is superficial I confuse the two books with each other.

I read little crime, but a Scandinavian crime writer I do like is Kersten Ekman--her books seem to me have more substance than the best-selling stuff. If you're interested, you might have a look at Under the Snow. And these two are more literary than Cold Earth, but again you can see what you think: Terrors of Ice and Darkness: A Novel, story of a man obssessed with a (real) 19th-century expedition to Arctic who disappears in Spitsbergen, and Beyond Sleep, which is set in Laplan--again, during the summer, though the descriptions are so convincing that I now know however much I want to visit the Arctic in winter I never, never would go there in summer. On the whole, the books that have given me the strongest sense of polar regions have been non-fiction.

I can't believe that no one's responded to the thread title with a remark like 'Try Nancy Mitford' . . .

(P.F. Konyali, Mitford was a minor English writer whose most famous book was a comedy of manners called Love in a Cold Climate.)

And P.S.--are there any literary novels dealing with rural life in Turkey you'd recommend? I'm ashamed to admit that the only Turkish novel I've read is My Name is Red, and I still haven't yet got round to reading an epic poem from Turkey that I've been intending to . . .

Posted on 15 Nov 2012 08:13:41 GMT
Dear Monica, thanks for your recommendations.
As for novels about the rural life in Turkey, I'm afraid I don't have much to say because as far as I know only a few have been translated. You could try Memed, My Hawk (Flamingo S.), written in 1955, a Turkish classic, and Snow by Orhan Pamuk, which I liked a lot. Another is Dear Shameless Death. I read it years many ago and fell in love with it, but I'm not sure about the translation because the main thing about the book is its beautiful, lyrical language. If you like it, you may also try Berji Kristin: Tales from the Garbage Hills. My favorite novel is "Margos, Tell Me Where You Are From" by an Armenian writer called Mıgırdic Margosyan, a delightful, hilarious and heartbreaking book about his childhood in Diyarbakir. Unfortunately, it hasn't been translated yet. If some day it is, you must read it. :)
We have a Nobel-winning author, but ironically, not many good novelists, I'm afraid. I hope these suggestions will be helpful.

Posted on 15 Nov 2012 09:25:15 GMT
Hullaballoo says:
Have you taken a look at Lexi Revellian's new book called 'Ice Diaries'? It is set in London in the future when London is under many feet of snow. It's a little different from Alaska but she's a good writer and worth investigating perhaps.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 18:05:30 GMT
LEP says:
On Thin Ice - Cherry Adair

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 18:06:49 GMT
LEP says:
The Eiger Sanction - Trevanian

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 18:11:18 GMT
LEP says:
Ice Station Zebra: Bear Island - both by Alistair MacLean

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 18:12:08 GMT
LEP says:
Wolf Winter - Claire Francis

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 18:50:42 GMT
LEP says:
The Dogs of Riga - Henning Mankell
Winter's Bone - Naniel Woodiell
The White Darkness - Geraldine McCaughrean
Death in a High Latitude - J R L Andersen
Play with Fire; A Cold Bloodied Business - Dana Stabenow
A Wolf in Death's Clothing: Murder most Grizzly - Elizabeth Quinn
Murder on the Iditerod Trail -Sue Henry
The Woman who Married a Bear - Benjamin Shaine
Shock Wave - Clive Cussler
Dead Cold - Louise Penny
Winter Study - Nevada Barr
Raven Black - Ann Cleeves
Gorky Park; Polar Star - Martin Cruz Smith
White Out - Ken Follet
Cold Granite - Stuart MacBride
Forty Words of Sorrow - Giles Blunt
Last Rituals - Yrsa Sigurordottir
Ice Cold - Tess Gerritsen
Arnakdur Indrideson's books

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 19:30:50 GMT
Ashley says:
A wonderful wintry novel is Nick Sweeney's Laikonik Express, a literary road-novel set in Poland just after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Laikonik Express. It's snowy, witty, vodka-drenched and very emotional.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Nov 2012 21:06:15 GMT
LEP says:
The Vanishing Act - Mette Jakobsen

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Feb 2013 13:45:34 GMT
TripFiction says:
Try this link: http://tripfiction.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/the-aurora-borealis-from-clarendon.html a very wintery book. And books that take you to the slopes are here: http://tripfiction.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/novels-to-take-skiing.html

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Feb 2013 19:45:14 GMT
Chris says:
As Far as My Feet Will Carry Me is set in Siberia. Very readable novelisation of a true story.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Feb 2013 09:21:06 GMT
Last edited by the author on 2 Mar 2013 17:49:19 GMT
Drude says:
I would like to suggest the following books/authors:
Michelle Paver: Dark Matters
Steph Penney: The Tenderness of Wolves
M J Mc Grath has written two crime novels from Ellesmere island and Alaska.
Sara Wheeler has written several books (travel, biography) with the arctic/antarctic as a theme. Brilliant authour!!
Beryl Bainbridge has written a novel on the antarctic.
Barry Lopez: Arctic Dreams.
Not all of these are novels as you can see, but well worth reading.
Also - There are many interesting books on the theme of arctic/Antarctic exploration. ( Ernest Shackleton - South)

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Mar 2013 16:49:46 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 1 Mar 2013 16:52:27 GMT]

Posted on 2 Mar 2013 03:37:48 GMT
Frank Mundo says:
Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow <--- unfortunately, I don't see it on Kindle.
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
Participants:  30
Total posts:  61
Initial post:  12 Nov 2012
Latest post:  28 May 2013

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