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how can I get more reviews?


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Showing 76-100 of 157 posts in this discussion
Posted on 24 Oct 2012 21:49:03 BDT
You clearly are a black comedy fan. ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Oct 2012 21:50:01 BDT
gille liath says:
Anything with black in the name, really.
Blackadder
Boys from the Black Stuff
Black Street Boys (Boyz?)...

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Oct 2012 21:51:28 BDT
Anita says:
More black than purple........ :)

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Oct 2012 21:52:55 BDT
gille liath says:
Deep Purple
Purple Haze
Purple People Eater

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 08:15:12 BDT
I Readalot says:
How about 'Black Books'? one of my favourite sitcoms ever, O to have the freedom of Bernard, Customer: 'Those books, are they real leather, everything else in my house is real'; Bernard: 'They're real Dickens', and that is him being polite.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 08:50:54 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
You did indeed but, presumably because of the antiquity of my internet system and the slowness of my typing (!), your post hadn't come up before I made the same point! American English doesn't bother me at all; where I do have an issue is America's love affair with euphemisms (particularly in a military context, as in "collateral damage") and all that management-speak and pshyco-babble. I know we in the U.K. are far from guiltless in this respect but perhaps our natural scepticism keeps it in check.

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 09:59:13 BDT
blackadder " i have a cunning plan my lord" "Baldrick, if it involves a turnip..." - oh great series :)
noticed the word "drug" popping up alot lately in american books as in "she drug me to the shops" thought it was weird at first - now realised its one of them american expressions i have to learn and understand

whats this expression about though - seems pointless to me but i must have read it 50 times in last 3 months "in and of itself" ? seems to crop up when characters are talking about something i.e " she thought the car was perfect which was not a problem in and of itself" sadly i can't think of an exact example to use....having moaned about how many times i've read it (blush)

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 10:39:02 BDT
Last edited by the author on 25 Oct 2012 10:39:42 BDT
I'm sorry if I kicked the hornets nest with this one. I have no axe (or ax) to grind (other than the "Bad Spelling" review I had "gotten" from a reviewer - something I have to live with). But to throw another into the pot we could take the word variation on Aluminium/Aluminum... I really don't favour (or favor) the latter, but I've read (within learned sources) that the latter is the correct and original form. Perhaps the American "thing" is tied up with traditions and roots etc? You look at the college system in which most awards and houses are all named in Latin. They do seem to dig their heels in against certain changes whilst are happy to accept things which originate there. I suppose this is only natural - don't we do the same over this side of the pond?

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 11:47:29 BDT
I insist on Aluminium, mainly because I grew up with that word. To omit that poor i just isn't fair. If anything than it's lazy. There!

You can't hear the omission in favour/favor, but you can in Aluminium.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 13:49:14 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
Apparently Sir Humphrey Davy (he of the famous lamp) couldn't decide on how to name/spell the wretched stuff - and he was the one who discovered it! At first he called it alumium, then changed it to aluminum and finally settled on aluminium. Given that Davy couldn't make his mind up, I think our American cousins can be forgiven this particular discrepancy.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 14:03:31 BDT
That'll teach us to make up our minds, make a decision, and stick to it.

Thank you.

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 15:29:06 BDT
@ N Williams. "I'm sorry if I kicked the hornets nest with this one."

Now there's a thing. Can't remember which way round it was between the UK and US version of Larson's book title, but one was "Hornet's nest" and the other "Hornets' nest." I think it was done just for the hell of it to show a different mind set.

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 15:45:11 BDT
That brought a big grin to my face... :)

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 15:47:37 BDT
Last edited by the author on 25 Oct 2012 15:47:59 BDT
It were the Americans who assumed that the nest belonged to one hornet.

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 15:50:49 BDT
How can anyone write "drug to the shops"? Surely that's going too blooming far? "Dove into the pool" makes sense perhaps but where will this end? I'm sounding like Victor Meldrew... got to stop this... I don't believe it!

Posted on 25 Oct 2012 16:01:27 BDT
By the way, Declan: they've corrected the error. Just checked. I wonder if the person who got that wrong received a major lecture. Goes to show that even people working for traditional publishing houses are human beings.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 19:17:36 BDT
R. Larkin says:
"noticed the word "drug" popping up alot lately in american books as in "she drug me to the shops" thought it was weird at first - now realised its one of them american expressions i have to learn and understand"

Nope, just poor language skills on the part of the author. (I'm American so I can say that.)

I am currently reading a British mystery on Kindle that has retained the North of England colloquialisms despite making the long trip. Very refreshing! Please don't change the versions of your books when you send them over here.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 19:52:26 BDT
B. R. Smith says:
Brent Smith says to C.J. Owen:
Firstly, don't be put off. Reviews are only opinions.
Secondly, who is your target market? You should be able to find out where they share views on the internet. Try your local newspaper too; they may review it under 'arts and events' or some such.
Thirdly --- this is the hard bit --- realise that a prose style that's all slang and abbreviations is MUCH HARDER to read. Concentrating on translating it hinders them from getting into the flow of the story.
Open up a book on Amazon. You may as well try with mine; A Wind From The West. You'll see what I mean. I'm happy to help you if you want, but above all, write for yourself, no others.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:08:57 BDT
I think writing for yourself is egoistic. Unless you never want to publish, that is.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:09:54 BDT
gille liath says:
Writing is egoistic, full stop. Unless you are doing it purely to turn a profit.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:13:52 BDT
Anita says:
Ahhh - gl, I do agree with you, am I ill or something? Writing is always egoistic and for oneself. But as 'oneself' is hardly so unique, somebody else also might get interested. (Am I giving you a chance to disagree?)

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:14:50 BDT
gille liath says:
Of course. Hardly so unique? Speak for yourself.... ;)

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:18:42 BDT
Yes, writing is egoistic, I write because I need the challenge and because I love that it keeps my brain active. But I'm not writing for myself only, if that makes sense? The activity itself is for me, but the outcome is for others. Of course a little bit for myself because I write what I enjoy. Mostly.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:21:36 BDT
Last edited by the author on 25 Oct 2012 20:22:09 BDT
gille liath says:
Sure. When I said 'write for yourself' I meant, a) try to do something that at least satisfies you, rather than trying to satisfy an imaginary readership; b) understand that the satisfaction of exercising your creativity is the biggest benefit on offer and, for most of us, likely to remain the only one.

(I said 'sure'. That okay? (and is okay okay...?))

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2012 20:22:11 BDT
Anita says:
I *am* speaking for myself. Of course :)

Honestly - I don't imagine a *really* good book written for someone else but oneself. Unless it's some kind of non-fiction (and even then not 100%)
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
Participants:  23
Total posts:  157
Initial post:  20 Oct 2012
Latest post:  4 Nov 2012

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