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Recommendations for 1950s novels


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Showing 1-25 of 26 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 24 May 2009 13:59:53 BDT
Baz says:
Looking for recommendations for novels written in and set in the 1950s. Must be by British authors. Mystery/crime/thriller preferred, but all suggestions welcome. (Have read Christie/Allingham/Tey). Thanks.

Posted on 24 May 2009 17:49:29 BDT
john christopers the death of grass, sometimes known as no blade of grass, written in 1956, it is a fantastic mystery/scifi novel

In reply to an earlier post on 24 May 2009 22:55:20 BDT
Last edited by the author on 24 May 2009 22:55:46 BDT
LEP says:
I think Ian Fleming's novels were written in the 1950's weren't they?

In reply to an earlier post on 25 May 2009 22:02:43 BDT
Baz says:
Yes, some were. Fleming should have been the first to be added to my list above. Read the print off the pages! Thanks, anyway.

Posted on 26 May 2009 15:16:20 BDT
Ed Taylor says:
If you try A Demon in my View by Ruth Rendell you will find a cracking good read which although not set in the 1950s has strong 1950s undertones running through it because what happens has its roots in 1950s behaviour in bringing up children at that time. This is one of my best three books ever and I hope you feel able to try it and enjoy it.

Posted on 26 May 2009 16:57:03 BDT
Big Softy says:
Brighton Rock - Graham Green

Posted on 26 May 2009 18:38:57 BDT
John Wyndham's 'The Midwich Cockoos' ; Graham Greene's 'The Quiet American' and Laurie Lee's 'Cider with Rosie'.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 May 2009 18:41:30 BDT
I know that Brighton Rock feels as though it should have been written in the Fifties but, surprisingly, it was actually written in 1938.

Posted on 26 May 2009 22:29:19 BDT
R. W. Black says:
I'd recommend Graham Green too - maybe "Our Man in Havana". Also "The Greengage Summer" by Rumer Godden.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Jun 2009 22:35:01 BDT
LEP says:
What about Nancy Mitford's books.

Posted on 8 Jun 2009 09:05:55 BDT
Patricia Wentworth's Miss Silver crime novels - Christie with more teeth! I've just discovered them and they're great - and there's loads of them!

Posted on 21 Jun 2009 16:27:50 BDT
A. Craig says:
Try Elizabeth Jennings's The Tortoise and the Hare. It's pure 50s, and pure agony - brilliantly written about a crushed wife discovering her husband has fallen for their plain, rich, blunt neighbour.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jun 2009 16:35:13 BDT
LEP says:
Dodie Smith; Nancy Mitford; James Herriott.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jun 2009 17:58:41 BDT
Have you tried The lady in the lake by Raymond Chandler5? Its first publish date was 44

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jun 2009 18:00:31 BDT
Have you tried The lady in the lake by Raymond Chandler5? Its first publish date was 44

Posted on 21 Jun 2009 21:15:51 BDT
Baz says:
Many thanks to all who've been gererous enough to make suggestions so far. I'll definitely give Patricia Wentworth a try.

Amanda - strange how the two reviews of 'The Tortoise and The Hare' are only recent, but I'm intrigued enough to give it a go. Thanks for the suggestion (and mega success with the writing). In return, you might like 'Beware Of Pity' by Stefan Zweig. At least check out the reviews...

Posted on 27 Feb 2013 15:15:50 GMT
Harris LBB says:
A story set in the early 1950s is life in a South London area, seen through the eyes of children The Battersea Gang this is the Kindle but there is also a paperback

Posted on 2 Mar 2013 22:24:10 GMT
Marion Stein says:
Just (as in finished 2 nights ago) reread, The Chrysalids, which was written in 1955. It's a great story. It falls in the sci-fi genre. While set in the future, it is very much of its time, and involves both a post-nuclear war future -- at a time when the Cold War was raging and many people believed such a catastrophe was inevitable, and it also involves the zenophobia and fear of any deviation from the norm that was common then.

Posted on 2 Mar 2013 22:26:11 GMT
Harris LBB says:
Thanks. Think I'll go and take a look at this one

Posted on 8 Mar 2013 02:19:30 GMT
Frank Mundo says:
Patricia Highsmith in the 1950s. Not too shabby:
Strangers on a Train, The Price of Salt
The Blunderer, The Talented Mr. Ripley
Deep Water, Game for Living

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Mar 2013 07:14:45 GMT
L. Cook says:
Georgette Heyer's crime fiction? Her writing stretched over your 1950's requirement and are bang on the era.

Posted on 8 Mar 2013 08:45:43 GMT
Sou'Wester says:
You might find Hammond Innes worth a look. He was a popular author of thrillers in the post-war years.

Posted on 8 Mar 2013 09:42:19 GMT
Harris LBB says:
"The Battersea Gang" is receiving a lot of Five Star Reviews...six of them to date

A very evocative and charmingly humorous tale, as seen through the eyes of the kids in post-war Britain.

Paperback & Kindle

The Battersea Gang

Posted on 8 Mar 2013 10:50:10 GMT
Dan Holloway says:
second the John Wydham and Patricia Highsmith recommendations
Nevil Shute's On the Beach is a classic
also, early John Le Carre
Daphne Du Maurier's career straddles the 50s and the superb My Cousin Rachel was from the decade

Posted on 8 Mar 2013 11:29:10 GMT
monica says:
The Man on the Bridge (Welbeck Modern Classics); Lucky Jim (Penguin Modern Classics); Room At The Top; Saturday Night and Sunday Morning; Ritual in the Dark.
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  26
Initial post:  24 May 2009
Latest post:  8 Mar 2013

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