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Does anyone else have a novel that they read over and over again, and why?


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Posted on 27 Nov 2013 17:45:28 GMT
Marion Stein says:
There are several books I'll return to. One in particular is A Fine & Private Place by Peter S Beagle. It's a strangely hopeful tale of love beyond the grave.

Posted on 27 Nov 2013 18:57:17 GMT
Sunshine says:
Mine is Night Pleasures by Sherrilyn Kenyon. It is about love ( I know soppy right?) What I like about it is that the heroine is not your typical beauty, she is a normal person. It makes me happy whenever I read it.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Nov 2013 08:43:37 GMT
A. G. Fox says:
Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. Its beautiful language and a powerful storyline

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Nov 2013 09:56:23 GMT
Ian Scott says:
My Christmas read is the Pickwick Papers combined with a mid-December trip to London. It just sets me up perfectly for the season.

Posted on 28 Nov 2013 14:14:54 GMT
T A. Lund says:
Like many other people have said, I don't tend to re-read many novels, but one I have read many times is The Shadow Of The Wind. It is so elegantly written, that even though its set in 1940's Barcelona, and I'm only a 25 year old Englishman, you get an amazing sense of nostalgia and immediate connection to the characters and the places. One of Zafon's creations is the forgotten cemetery of books, a labyrinth of used books, saved by fastidious collectors so that one copy of every printed books survives forever. The story starts the Daniel, son of a used book store owner who is entrusted with saving a book from the forgotten cemetery, and he becomes in captivated with it. Truly a book lover's book!

Posted on 1 Dec 2013 14:25:21 GMT
CARTER says:
Mine is STOKERS DRACULA

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Dec 2013 20:28:34 GMT
gille liath says:
Well there's one to start with, then. :)

Posted on 4 Dec 2013 15:58:17 GMT
"BookGirl" says:
I have re-read, '84 Charingcross Rd' a least once a year since mid '90's.it's not a novel, but a collection of letters written 50's-60's between a New York writer and an English,London based, Antiquarian bookseller.
They formed a lasting friendship,though they never actually met each other,through correspondence for the supply of books, unobtainable or too costly,in New York. I never tire of it.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2013 16:30:43 GMT
JW says:
Hi BookGirl - Just wondered if you've read Duchess Bloomsbury St. Eqiunox I understand it's the follow-on to 84 Charing Cross Road where Helene eventually makes it to England. It's one I've been meaning to read but haven't yet got around to it.

Posted on 4 Dec 2013 22:55:56 GMT
every year i read The House on the Borderland by William Hope Hodgson...better than any artificial aid,an amazing tour de force to be enjoyed - the best novel of weird fiction ever written...Chris Thorrington

Posted on 5 Dec 2013 20:01:50 GMT
D. J. Parkin says:
Almost any book that I've enjoyed once I will probably read again. But if I could only keep one book on my shelves it would have to be J. B. Priestley's 'The Good Companions'. First published more than 80 years ago it tells of the adventures of three people who leave their respective homes on the same day before coming together with a travelling concert party. Can't think how many times I've read it since the first time more than fifty years ago.

Agree with 'BookGirl' about '84 Charing Cross Road'. It's wonderful.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Dec 2013 23:40:32 GMT
Chris says:
I've read a lot of King, but until I read your post, not this one. Finished it really quickly. You could pick holes in the premise, but it says a lot for King's ability that he can keep you interested in a story that is for 300 pages mostly just a few teenage boys walking and talking.
I soon realised there wasn't going to be a B plot, which is fine by me, but I was dreading the inevitable flashbacks. Thought that was the only thing he could do to break up the main thread, but he even managed to keep those to an minimum. Quite amazing.

Posted on 7 Dec 2013 20:48:08 GMT
I find myself reading Richard Mathison's "I Am Legend" and "The Incredible Shrinking Man." I love the solitary circumstances where they have to be self reliant to survive.

I also return to Ian McEwan novels quite regularly - "The Cement Garden" and "First Love Last Rites" in particular.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Dec 2013 08:42:51 GMT
Chris Allen says:
Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour ( 3 books ) - I read them over and over again to the point where I cannot any more; the penguin originals are in pieces!

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Dec 2013 08:33:14 GMT
sharoline says:
I agree ,
within minutes of reading I'm laughing at his descriptions, Brilliant author!

Posted on 9 Dec 2013 09:27:34 GMT
John Smith says:
The Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit.

I always read them once every year

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Dec 2013 20:23:36 GMT
Lin says:
No, it's not just you, Chris! Terry Pratchett makes perfect comfort reading. I've read all the earlier works umpteen times, especially the witches and the Watch.
Hooray for classy punctuation!

Posted on 11 Dec 2013 20:37:39 GMT
Lin says:
Has anybody mentioned Mark A. Radcliffe's 'Gabriel's Angel' yet? It's got characters you really care about, laugh-out-loud bits and parts that move you to tears. After multiple readings it still makes me snigger and snivel (not at the same time, though). Come to think of it, it must be time to get it out again...
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Discussion in:  fiction discussion forum
Participants:  145
Total posts:  218
Initial post:  10 Sep 2012
Latest post:  11 Dec 2013

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