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Fan assisted oven nightmare! PLEASE HELP!


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Showing 176-200 of 239 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 28 Apr 2012 12:13:14 BDT
NOG says:
In fan assisted ovens you will find that differant parts of the oven are at difrant temps. So either turn the cake tin every 10 mins or thru trial and error find the best place in the oven and always put your cakes there....or best of all turn the heat down and cook the cake till it is done. I cook everything at 140 and keep checking I use the same metal knife to check to see if it is done.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 09:40:02 BDT
LHforever says:
I understand your frustration! Are you sure that your oven thermostat is working ok? If it's sluggish the oven with be getting far too hot for baking before it cuts back, then it might go too cool if u r slightly overcompensating to stop burning. I am never able to follow exact guidelines with my fan oven - I cut temps back about 15 deg c and cooking time upto a third -they are quick ovens but efficient! Insert metal skewer to test if cake is baked.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 11:07:49 BDT
buster says:
Try a lower heat and longer cooking time,my tip that heips prevent the outside cooking is I always have a dish of water at the bottom of my oven when I bake ,

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 12:51:19 BDT
Mr. M. Mapp says:
I was wondering if your thermostat was working properly, When I first got mine the stat wasnt plugged in, just something else to check, hope this helps

Posted on 29 Apr 2012 17:26:04 BDT
Mary Seacole says:
Sorry if this has been mentioned before, but I can't see anything in the previous posts (I admit, I haven't read them all) about consulting your oven manual. I have a fan oven and the manual says the oven must not be preheated before the cake goes in. I did read it twice to see if it was a mistake, as it goes against everything I've been taught, but it works as cakes turn out fine in my oven. My manual also gives the temperature and shelf position as well, and it seems to have helped as before I tried it all my cakes kept going wrong. If you haven't got yours trying searching online, as it may be up there or ask the manufacturer if they'll let you have one.

Also, using a thin table knife or (this is not for the faint-hearted!) touching the middle of the cake lightly with your finger to see if it springs back is another way of checking whether it's really done, as toothpicks or skewers don't work for me as I use professional cake tins of not less than 3" deep.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 17:48:51 BDT
peaches says:
Hi, i have a fan oven also, have found that cakes and sponges do well about three quarters to the top of the oven and cooked at around 150 mine always come out perfect using this method.
Hope thsi helps

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 17:51:31 BDT
peaches says:
Hi, i have a fan oven also, have found that cakes and sponges do well about three quarters to the top of the oven and cooked at around 150 mine always come out perfect using this method.
Hope thsi helps

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Apr 2012 07:45:36 BDT
I know where you are coming from, only last night I had a nightmare about a fan assisted oven but the previous night I had a pleasant dream about a dishwasher I wonder what Tonight will bring?

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Apr 2012 08:28:41 BDT
Hello Toni
When you say lower your temperature by at least 20-30 degrees wouldn't that make you liable to catch hyperthermia and the surroundings be a little uncomfortable for any guests?

Posted on 11 Jun 2012 17:54:11 BDT
Baldrych says:
I've only just ordered my fan assisted oven, so you can realised how pleased I am at finding this forum. Apart from all the technical advice on temperatures etc, the most important thing I've learnt is that time and patience are a 'must'. You have all helped me avoid the despair in thinking that when things don't initially turn out right, I should have stayed with what I know.
Thank you all.
Harry

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jun 2012 17:58:24 BDT
Henrietta says:
When cooking a large cake for a long time - for example a rich fruit cake I tie a double layer of brown paper (the sort you wrap parcels in for posting) round the outside of the tin, extending an inch or so above the edge of the tin. If I'm using a single base tin I often stand the cake on a folded sheet of newspaper. This way you don't get a cake which is burnt on the outside and under-done on the inside.

Towards the end of cooking time check that the top isn't getting too brown and if it is and the rest of the cake needs a little longer put a sheet of foil (dull side facing the cake) or greaseproof paper loosely on top.

(And trade your electric oven in for a gas one. The hot air in an electric oven is drier than that in a gas oven so not so good for baking - and yes, I've used both so I speak from experience.)

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jun 2012 18:00:20 BDT
Henrietta says:
Oh yes, and don't use a wooden tooth pick to test a cake for cooked-ness. Use a fine metal skewer or knitting needle. It gives a better, more reliable result.

Posted on 14 Jun 2012 18:04:46 BDT
Henrietta says:
A further thought is.... Do you allow the oven to come to temperature after turning it on and before putting in the cake? If you don't allow the internal heat to stabilise the oven will be to cold for the cake but before coming to the correct temp will become very hot. Takes about 15 minutes from cold. I know some manufacturers say that this is not necessary on fan ovens but take my word for it, it is.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jun 2012 22:03:49 BDT
senga says:
Reduce your temp by 10 degrees to whatever the receipe states, aslo use baking paper around your tin as this will stop the sides from burning and if the top starts to burn use the same paper on top

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jun 2012 10:52:06 BDT
Hi David
Reduce the temperature by 20 degrees and the time. If it is a multifunction oven select conventional heat and cook as normal - the symbol for conventional heat is usually two solid stripes - Jan, appliances journalist

Posted on 18 Jun 2012 09:33:59 BDT
I couldn't read through all your answera but I have a new oven and found that it was worth while using recipes the manufacturers used. Temperatures used can then be applied to your recipes. It also makes a big difference which shelf is used.
I know that not all ovens are supplied with a cook book, as mine was, but look up the manufacturers web site.

Posted on 18 Jun 2012 10:39:22 BDT
Try a cup of Horlicks before retiring to bed and with a bit of luck you will get a good nights sleep with no nightmares.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jun 2012 12:37:52 BDT
pixie says:
Where have you been stintoto? Sunning yourself somewhere exotic.....and what have you done with suzy?

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jun 2012 13:05:31 BDT
Well I hope she hasn't snuck into my Stintoto Trebostine Super Frosty Freezer with Captain Balaclava and Colin Morrison!

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jun 2012 18:02:10 BDT
pixie says:
Well it's her own fault...she was warned! Quiet on her without her! Hope she off enjoying herself!

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jun 2012 17:46:54 BDT
Betty B says:
Hi David
I ent through the same problems, I reduce temp by 10 degrees for cup cakes and 15 for larger cakes and keep a close eye by setting timer for 10 mins as soon as I feel top is browning too soon I reduce temp by further 5 or 10 degrees, if I know it is likely to burn early, ie brownies or Christmas cake a put a double layer of brown paper around the cake tin and another double layer with a hole about the size of a 50p coin resting on the top of the baking parchment lining which I always cut a good inch about the tin height. I would also leave a very moist cake like carrot in oven after I have turned it off for maybe 10 mins.
You may have trouble with yorkshire puddings if so follow Jamie Oliver's original recipe and leave lots of room about dish as I've had them rise by as much as 7".

You will love your oven as soon as you get used to it because everything cooks so much more quickly and evenly and you can bake 3 trays of cup cakes at a time so do persevere.

Very best of luck

Betty
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In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2012 13:02:31 BDT
Hello David, I to am an enthusiastic cook albeit a very old one...Coming to terms with new technology is a challenge that includes Computers etc What I found cooking cakes in a fan oven is to bake at least 10 degree lower than instructed and to use a lower shelf 2nd from the bottom I find about right for 8in tins. Hope this helps.Oh and as for sticking a tooth pick in :Dont.... just run two fingers very gently over the top if the middle is cooked it will spring back. June.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2012 15:07:15 BDT
SIMMO says:
does your cooker have a "top" oven!

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2012 15:40:55 BDT
E. Bentley says:
Hi there
Try cooking sponge cakes on 160c FAN for around 18-25 mins - you may be cooking on too high a temperature for your oven... As Mrs Ispirian said you normally cook on 20c lower than normal ovens - again another possible tip, try using the lowest shelf as heat normally gets circulated underneath in a fan oven and goes down from the back underneath the tray and comes up from the front... Good luck

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2012 16:55:19 BDT
No. I have a bog standard 7 year old INDESIT The best oven I have ever owned, It took me some time to work out why my cakes came out like yours, oven to hot 160c about right 2nd shelf from the bottom should do the trick. I have to mention I make the best Yorkshire puddings for miles around with the heat turned on to 220c top shelf !!! Good Luck .
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Discussion in:  cooking discussion forum
Participants:  177
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Initial post:  3 Dec 2010
Latest post:  18 Sep 2013

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