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Recipe Lost and Found


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In reply to an earlier post on 16 Oct 2012 20:36:15 BDT
Shouldn't laugh... but I did. Must have taken him ages to get his sense of taste back.

Posted on 18 Oct 2012 13:35:29 BDT
Last edited by the author on 18 Oct 2012 13:39:21 BDT
Hiyah Everybody!......x
According to my e-newletters - last week was National Chocolate Week!......and this week is National Baking Week! :o>
So, I thought I'd share this simple recipe that will celebrate both at the same time - and has only five ingredients as well!......

Chocolate By Cheating Cake!......Serves 6 to 8 - or just one very hungry Roo!......x

400g (14oz) chocolate hazelnut spread, such as Nutella // 3 medium eggs // 125g (4oz) self-raising flour // 200g pack full-fat cream cheese, such as Philadelphia // a handful of chocolate sweets, such as Mini Eggs, Maltesers, Smarties to decorate.

Preheat oven to 350F // 180C // 160C Fan // Gas mark 4. Grease and line a 20.5cm (8in) round cake tin with baking parchment. In a large bowl, mix together - 300g (11oz) of the chocolate hazelnut spread, the eggs and the flour until combined.

Empty mixture into the lined cake tin, level the surface and bake for 35 - 40min, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the oven and cool for 10min - then take out of the tin and cool completely on a wire rack.

To make the icing, mix together the cream cheese and the remaining chocolate hazelnut spread until well combined. Spread icing on top of the cooled cake and then decorate generously with the chocolate sweets. Serve in slices......Enjoy!

Posted on 19 Oct 2012 09:43:05 BDT
Bearman says:
Ori - if you decide to have another go, try it in very very small amounts (think of it as miso concentrate), perhaps with eggs (poached or scambled egg on Marmite toast, or Marmite toast "soldiers" dipped into a boiled egg - that will bring out the inner child in you :-) )

Have you ever tried "Gentlemen's Relish" - anchovy based super strong and salty spread.

I also have one other favourite, which not many people in the UK seem to like. "Kalles Caviar" which is like a super concentrated and sweetened version of Taramasalata - available at Ikea.

Posted on 19 Oct 2012 11:40:48 BDT
We don't have Marmite/Vegemite here...I only saw them at the home of Oz acquaintances, their families mail it to them. Never seen GR, but I've read about it.
Ikea food = <3. We haven't been out there for a couple of years...we always spend too much at the little market.
I'll taste anything at least once, unless it smells of pee!

Posted on 19 Oct 2012 12:38:25 BDT
Bearman says:
I won't offer you any of my homemade cider then!

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Oct 2012 15:04:30 BDT
pixie says:
Ori said smells not taste!Lol! Only teasing Bearman...I like Gentlemans relish too.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Oct 2012 15:54:36 BDT
And I'm sure that the Gentleman relishes you back, Pixie!
But what we really want to know is which Anchovy Paste you like best?!! ;o>

Posted on 19 Oct 2012 16:20:04 BDT
Bearman says:
OOooo Matron!

Pixie, only our basic (low sugar) cider tasted like pee. Our flavoured ciders were so strong that your taste bud hoisted the white flag on the first sip. The cider with Ginger and Lemon Grass was particularly notable for the length of time the ginger's burning sensation continued after the glass had been drained.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Oct 2012 16:25:01 BDT
pixie says:
Living in Somerset it's Cider all the way..Mick Jagger's brother owns a cider farm nearby and it really is the drink here. Was in a pub and a man came in, a holidaymaker, and asked for a pint of cider the barmen poured the drink and the poor chap stood there and said "excuse me but I think there is something wrong with my drink, it's got bits in" Barman, eyes rolling " That's how we drink it here sir!"
Dehydrates the life out of me!

Posted on 22 Oct 2012 13:10:41 BDT
Last edited by the author on 22 Oct 2012 13:12:08 BDT
Here's a new recipe?......so, according to the thread, this one is found!......

The Devil's Own Roast Ribs!......Serves: 20 - so adjust your ingredient amounts accordingly!

The write-up in Country Living says -
"Good meat is rarely improved by immersing it in a complex marinade. There are some exceptions, of course, one of them being ribs, the raison d'tre of which are the sticky caramelised threads of meat that cling to the bones, helped on their way by a marinade that balances the sweet with the sour. Have your guests coming back for seconds with these sticky, mouth-watering ribs. "

Preparation Time: 15 mins // Cooking Time: 1 hour and 30 mins.

2 kgs free-range pork ribs // sea salt // 1 handful medium-hot red chillies.

For the marinade: 4 tabsp tomato ketchup // 4 tabsp groundnut oil // 2 tabsp English mustard // 2 tabsp Worcestershire sauce // 1 tabsp dry sherry or Madeira // 4 tabsp runny honey // 2 tabsp red wine vinegar // 4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed to paste // 2 teasp fresh ginger, finely grated // Half teasp ground fennel seeds // Half teasp cayenne pepper.

Whisk together all ingredients for marinade in large bowl. Add ribs and coat them in mixture. Cover and chill for at least one hour, ideally several. Preheat oven to 180C // 160C fan // Gas mark 4.

Arrange ribs in two roasting trays in a single layer, spooning over marinade. Season generously with salt and tuck in chillies. Roast for 1 hours, turning halfway through. Serve 15 - 20 mins after taking out of oven - once ribs are cool enough to handle - with the chillies for those who dare!......Enjoy!

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 14:52:55 BDT
Isobel Ayres says:
Oh lord that sounds good! Love ribs. I miss the ribs from the Chinese restaurants in the US. Way better than our Chinese ribs...

Posted on 22 Oct 2012 16:02:17 BDT
So true...our local Chinese restaurants are dreadful...basically everything tastes the same, and has the same veggies (courgette and huge chunks of onion and carrot). We finally gave up on them. Their "barbecued ribs" are covered with a bright red powder that looks like a failed Tandoori thing, and never tastes of much.

Posted on 22 Oct 2012 16:51:37 BDT
Someone on the Religion Forum lost his grandfather's recipe for 'boily bake cake'. Anyone got an idea?

I found something on a website but don't really know whether it's right. So I've come to the experts. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 16:55:46 BDT
Isobel Ayres says:
Yeah. We've got one pretty good Chinese down the road, but the ribs are still a bit pants - always far too fatty and never sticky/chewy enough.

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 16:59:30 BDT
Honestly?!......that's a new one on me?!!
Does he mean a Boiled & Baked Cake? because I have loads of recipes for those?......x

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 17:16:34 BDT
Here's the recipe I found, but I don't know any more than that.

http://margeland.co.uk/blog/2007/10/08/peeks-boily-bake-cake/

Posted on 22 Oct 2012 17:26:08 BDT
Last edited by the author on 22 Oct 2012 17:27:34 BDT
Okay, this is a really good 'un, Sam - I have made it a few times and people always want the recipe afterwards.

Also known as a 'Simmer & Stir' or a 'Bubble & Bake' Cake. Particularly good at Christmas.
It makes a 20cm round cake. Prep: 1 hr - 1 hr and 15 mins. Cook: 1 hr - 2 hrs and 30 mins.

175g butter, chopped // 200g dark muscovado sugar // 750g luxury mixed dried fruits - one that includes mixed peel and glac cherries // finely grated zest and juice of 1 orange // finely grated zest of 1 lemon // 100ml (3 fl oz) cherry brandy or brandy plus 4 tabsp more // 85g macadamia nuts // 3 large eggs, lightly beaten // 85g ground almonds // 200g plain flour // teasp baking powder // 1 teasp ground mixed spice // 1 teasp ground cinnamon // teasp ground allspice.

Put butter, sugar, fruit, zests, juice and 100ml (3fl oz) brandy in large pan. Bring slowly to boil, stirring until butter has melted. Reduce heat and bubble for 10 mins, stirring occasionally. Remove pan from heat and leave to cool for 30 mins.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 150C // 130C fan // Gas mark 2, and line cake tin. Toast nuts in a dry frying pan, tossing them until evenly browned, or pop them in oven for 8 to 10 minutes - but keep an eye on them as they burn easily. When they are cool, chop roughly. Stir eggs, nuts and ground almonds into fruit mixture and mix well. Sift flour, baking powder and spices into pan. Stir in gently, until there are no traces of flour left.

Spoon mixture into tin and smooth it down evenly - you'll find this is easiest with back of metal spoon which has been dipped into boiling water. Bake for 45 minutes, then turn down heat to 140C // 120C fan // Gas mark 1, and cook for further 1 - 1 hrs (about a further 1 hrs if you have a gas oven) until cake is dark golden in appearance and firm to touch. Cover top of cake with foil if it starts to darken too much. To check cake is done, insert fine skewer into centre - if it comes out clean, it is cooked.

Make holes all over warm cake with fine skewer and spoon the extra 4 tabsp brandy over the holes until it has all soaked in. Leave cake to cool in the tin. When it's cold, remove it from tin, peel off lining paper, then wrap first in baking parchment and then in foil. The cake will keep in a cupboard for up to three months - or you can freeze it for six months. And you will definitely enjoy it!......x

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 17:33:12 BDT
Sounds great, Suzy.

Remind me again... What's a diet?

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 17:36:32 BDT
A Guilt Trip booked and paid for by some-one else?!!......x

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 17:37:35 BDT
lol

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2012 19:04:50 BDT
pixie says:
BBCgoodfood.com/recipes/5824/nans-boiled-fruit-cake they are much of a muchness Sam but this is the gist!

Posted on 22 Oct 2012 19:35:04 BDT
Charlie says:
Oh Suzy that sounds yummy as always. I'm going to make that asap! You truly are the goddess of all thing cakey

Posted on 11 Nov 2012 20:01:56 GMT
OK, let me throw this one out there. I know it's darn near impossible but I live in hope.
Anybody out there got a copy of Ursula K. Leguin's "Always Coming Home"? There are several recipes in the back and one is for a dish called "Old Hen." It's kind of a chicken stew thing. I lost my copy and don't really want to buy the novel (which was only okay-ish) for the recipes.
Help?

Posted on 11 Nov 2012 20:50:26 GMT
Last edited by the author on 11 Nov 2012 20:55:40 GMT
pixie says:
Simmer a chicken in wine bayleaf and chopped rosemary til done.
Take the meat from the bones and keep enough stock to cook your rice.
Simmer the rest of the stock with a handful of sliced almonds, sliced celery andcarrots. Some radish, yellow or green squash and onions etc....(sorry to be vague but that's what it says Ori) Add spinach or other greens and mushrooms, fresh or dried.
Add the chicken meat diced and parsley,coriander and some spring onion.
Season with some cumin seeds and red pepper,salt or lemon.
Serve with the rice cooked in the stock.
May add boiled egg,tomato,hot chutney or dried fruits.

Hope this is ok Ori!

Posted on 11 Nov 2012 21:58:22 GMT
Sounds a nice recipe, Pixie. I think I shall give it a go. What do you use instead of a boiled egg, tomato, hot chutney or dried fruit, for November? x
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Discussion in:  cooking discussion forum
Participants:  11
Total posts:  129
Initial post:  10 Oct 2012
Latest post:  10 Jan 2013

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