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fairy -cup cakes help please


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Showing 26-50 of 58 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 27 Jun 2010 20:50:35 BDT
Linda P says:
Hi, I have just started reading the cooking forums and think that it is a fantastic idea and have already learned lots of new tips. In response to the fairy cake problem, I have found that eggs can vary enormously in weight/size and this can affect the consistency of the cake mixture. The 6-6-6-3 method assumes that the eggs weigh 2 oz each; by weighing the eggs (in their shells) and then adding equal quantities of fat (soft margarine), flour (self raising), sugar (caster) and 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder for every egg used you should be successful every time. The dropping consistency should be that the mixture falls off the spoon when given a tap on the side of the bowl. If the mix is too stiff add some milk until it reaches the right dropping consistency. This works for me and I hope it will for you too. Happy cooking!

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Jun 2010 13:47:11 BDT
Abbiemum says:
Try looking in Eat Me!: The Stupendous, Self-raising World of Cupcakes and Bakes According to Cookie Girl there are some funky flavours in there

Posted on 28 Jun 2010 22:23:51 BDT
re- funky weding fairy cakes, i find its best to stick to a plain vanilla cake and go to town with the toppings. I'd recommend only using paste colours as they give more vivid hues wthout making your icing runny. Try visiting a cake making shop for ideas. You can get some really nice cutters to use with fondant icing or flower paste which is simple to use but gives great effects. Simple but striking ideas are the bride and grooms initials mixed up with hearts and flowers etc in the wedding colours or if they have a shared hobby/interest you could get a cutter to show this, musical notes etc. Good luck, leave yourself at least a day to decorate and consider using a maderia sponge receipe as it keeps better than a victoria sponge based one.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Jun 2010 07:35:41 BDT
Thank you . thats sounds great. I will try the paste colours, as you say the food colourings do make the icing runny. she'd decided on red velvet cupcakes. i so love her faith in me..... ha ha

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Jun 2010 11:27:27 BDT
G. Scholtz says:
Hi M
This is the recipe my family has been using for years, and they are always wonderful, without fail! People are calling me asking to please bake them some cupcakes!
225g softened butter, 225g caster sugar, 225g selfraising flour, 1 tsp baking powder, 4 eggs, 1 tsp vanilla essence
Preheat your oven to 175 degreesC, and place your 18 paper cups in the muffin tin.
Place all the ingredients in a bowl and beat with an electric whisk until smooth and pale, about 3 min. DO NOT OVERWHISK. That's when they become tough and dry.
Spoon into cases and bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Rather err on the short side, otherwise they'll be dry.
These will be lovely, light and moist. Good luck!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2010 11:18:08 BDT
I don't think you can beat making fairy cakes out of a chocolate mudcake recipe. It's also melt'n'mix so you don't have to worry about creaming etc.
I made about 120+ recently for a wedding celebration - hoping to have leftovers afterwards - but they all got eaten!
I used both the White chocolate and Dark chocolate recipes from Crave: A Passion for Chocolate. (Each recipe makes about 3 dozen fairycakes)

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2010 21:10:41 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 4 Jul 2010 21:13:46 BDT]

Posted on 10 Jul 2010 19:40:35 BDT
Laura K says:
Hi, I had this same problem for years. Don't use the 6-6-6-3 formula, it won't work (no offense!) the best I've found is the recipe in the Primrose Bakery Cookbook - absolutely brilliant. I went from making such bad cupcakes that the cheap supermarket ones tasted better, to now being asked to supply cupcakes at any event I go to. All the recipes in this book work too so great value for money!

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jul 2010 19:20:17 BDT
Cupcake fan says:
I bought a little book called 'Cupcake Magic' from Amazon, I forget the author, but she is a mumprenuer from Devon I think who I read about in a Country Living magazine article. I have now lost count of the number of people I have given her basic cupcake recipe to - the book is again on loan (second time in as many weeks) so I can't check her name, but her book is not expensive so check it out. Butter icing is fab too. And many inspiring pics of cakes that I still haven't tried - one day! (Jane Sinjari - or similar is the author's name I think)

Posted on 14 Jul 2010 15:47:45 BDT
Sam Lou says:
This recipe never fails:
Put shelves into lower part of oven (fan oven - it does make a difference). Put oven on 160 C before you start mixing.
Weigh the eggs (without the shells!) using digital scales, then add exactly the same weight of caster sugar, SR flour and soft margarine (i use Flora original - don't use light margarine). Put it all in together then mix on full speed for about 5 mins (I have a Kitchen Aid Artisan Mixer, others may take a bit longer). Use paper fluted cases in a metal bun tin. Cook for 18 mins, then check, might need a few mins more. They should be slightly springy to touch. Happy baking!

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jul 2010 18:49:28 BDT
Etty says:
my daughter had a tower of small fairy cakes at her wedding. She decorated them with lemon icing and bought little yellow flowers ( from supermarket) to decorate. Flowers at wedding were all yellows + cream - it looked really lovely and they were delicious!!

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jul 2010 23:28:45 BDT
Last edited by the author on 17 Jul 2010 23:40:36 BDT
DawnF says:
Hi, I used to be rubbish at baking fairy cakes, until I tried Nigella Lawson's recipe. Can look up on her website or it's in her "Nigella Bites" book on p81. They are light and alway come out perfect. Have to keep an eye on timer though, as are quick to cook! I always use an electric hand mixer and the addition of skimmed milk to get required consistency seems to be key to their lightness. Happy baking - do try her recipe, you won't regret it! Oh and if doing lots for wedding then if have a proper mixer (Kenwood Chef, or similar), I would use that in place of hand mixer and once happy with test batch, just multiply the recipe ingredients to suit No of cupcakes you need.
Also definitely use the paste colours and if you look online or have a cake supplies shop nearby, then there are some fab edible sparkly dusts you can get to decorate.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Jul 2010 20:36:33 BDT
I agree with you totally.I have the same cookbook and i h ave been told to start my own business.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jul 2010 12:00:52 BDT
M. James says:
maple/pecan is delish! use the 6,6,6,3 recipie and add 2 level tablespoons of maple syrup and about 2oz (a handfull) of chopped pecans or wallnuts. To be honest, when I use this recipie I don't mess about creaming butter and suger. I melt the butter in the microwave (without it getting too hot) and chuck everything except the nuts in and give it a good mix. add the nuts and get it into a heated oven pronto. I think the trick is giving the mix as good a mix as you can without taking to long (the bicarb starts to work as soon as it meets the wet) and making sure the oven is hot before they go in.

lemon drizzle is another variation I love. Again the ol' 6'6'6'3 with the zest of a large lemon. Use the lemon juice and caster sugar to make the topping...it goes lovely and crunchy and the sweet lemon juice soaks into the top of the cake. Add the lemon juice to the sugar not the the other way round or you'l end up with too much. It should be quite syrupy/thick but still with crystals (for the crunch).

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jul 2010 12:00:54 BDT
M. James says:
maple/pecan is delish! use the 6,6,6,3 recipie and add 2 level tablespoons of maple syrup and about 2oz (a handfull) of chopped pecans or wallnuts. To be honest, when I use this recipie I don't mess about creaming butter and suger. I melt the butter in the microwave (without it getting too hot) and chuck everything except the nuts in and give it a good mix. add the nuts and get it into a heated oven pronto. I think the trick is giving the mix as good a mix as you can without taking to long (the bicarb starts to work as soon as it meets the wet) and making sure the oven is hot before they go in.

lemon drizzle is another variation I love. Again the ol' 6'6'6'3 with the zest of a large lemon. Use the lemon juice and caster sugar to make the topping...it goes lovely and crunchy and the sweet lemon juice soaks into the top of the cake. Add the lemon juice to the sugar not the the other way round or you'l end up with too much. It should be quite syrupy/thick but still with crystals (for the crunch).

Posted on 21 Jul 2010 14:21:39 BDT
R. Battersby says:
May sound silly but if you are having problems baking cakes, are you sure your oven door seal is working? I had a patch when all my cakes would no longer bake correctly only to find when I put a chicken on to roast and left it that the whole kitchen was very hot.
Other than that for victoria sandwich mix I weigh the eggs in their shells (in grammes because that's the default for the scales) and use the exact same measure for fat, sugar and self-raising flour. For a chocolate version I add 50g (1.5-2 oz) Green & Black's cocoa per 2 egg quantity removing the same of flour and adding a teaspoon of baking powder to compensate for the loss of raising agent. I also like to add a bit of vanilla extract to the eggs when mixing.
I'd avoid using Trex regularly as it is a trans-fat and therefore as unhealthy for you as it gets - though if you wanted a whiter cake (say Angel Cake) I could understand people using it.

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Jul 2010 21:52:32 BDT
J. Mcwhirter says:
Buy the Hummingbird cookbook, all the cupcakes work which make a change, and they have some great recipes. Highly recommended, good luck!

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jul 2010 21:25:49 BDT
1 medium egg, 2 oz Self Raising Flour, 2 oz castor sugar, 2 oz Stork Margarine - this makes 3 - 4 cakes depending on the size of the cases. I normally make 5 eggs worth at a time and add 1 5ml of baking powder. Either put into a mixer but only until just mixed. Put into cases 2/3rd full and cook at 160 for 15 - 20 mins. You can make in a processor but do not overbeat - only mix until all ingredients are combined.

Posted on 27 Jul 2010 01:12:53 BDT
Hmm, I assume you have all looked at the recipes pages in cakecentral dot com?

Recommended if you have not already visited there.

Posted on 27 Jul 2010 10:54:52 BDT
Last edited by the author on 30 Jul 2010 14:32:59 BDT
I found this recipe when I was searching for something a little different a while ago. This makes really nice cakes, and what's more they keep longer than your average cup cakes. (useful when you are batch baking for a charity stall)
Ingredients
For the Cupcakes

* 150ml pot natural yogurt
* 3 eggs , beaten
* 1 tsp vanilla extract
* 175g golden caster sugar
* 140g self-raising flour
* 1 tsp baking powder
* 100g ground almonds
* 175g unsalted butter , melted

For the White Chocolate Frosting

# 100g white chocolate
# 140g unsalted butter
# 140g icing sugar

1. Line a 12-hole muffin tin with paper cases and heat oven to 190C/fan 170C/gas 5. In a jug, mix the yogurt, eggs and vanilla extract. Put the dry ingredients, plus a pinch of salt, into a large bowl and make a well in the middle.
2. Add the yogurty mix and melted butter, and quickly fold in with a spatula or metal spoon - don't overwork it. Spoon into the cases (they will be quite full) and bake for 18-20 mins or until golden, risen and springy to the touch. Cool for a few mins, then lift the cakes onto a wire rack to cool completely. Keep in an airtight container for up to 3 days or freeze as soon as possible.
3. White chocolate frosting: Melt the chocolate in the microwave on High for 1½ mins, stirring halfway. Leave to cool. Beat the butter and icing sugar in a large bowl until creamy. Beat in the chocolate. Cover and chill for up to one month.
4. Up to 48 hrs before serving (or the day before if it's really hot), bring the frosting back to room temperature, then spread over the cakes. Keep cool, out of direct sunlight.

These can also be used to make the perfect alternative to a traditional fruit wedding cake, and can look even prettier if you tie a narrow ribbon around each cake and place sugar roses on the top.

Alternatively you can use this mixture to make a large cake

Make it a cake

If you want a cake to cut, make a batch of batter and bake in a lined, deep 20cm round cake tin at 190C/fan 170C/gas 5 for 40-45 mins. Serve on a pretty cake plate, topped with frosting and roses. Keep in a cool place away from moisture and light.

If you would rather not cook with nuts, swap the ground almonds for 100g more plain flour. The end result will still taste great, but won't keep or freeze quite as well.

Posted on 5 Aug 2010 01:47:28 BDT
cakes rise because of the air in the mixture (sifted flours; and beating in the eggs) and chemical reactions between the alkali raising agents (baking powder) reacting to the mild acids in the wet ingredients
what flattens the cake is lowering the temperature suddenly during baking (opening the oven door to soon) and overmixing the ingredients which takes out the air

for best results: have a good preheated oven, put the cakes as soon as you can after mixing in the flour and leave them alone until they're cooked

an alternative to adding extra raising agent (which will taint the flavour) is choosing a more acidic flavourings, like lemon juice rather than vanilla essence, or using yoghurt as an alternative to milk

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2011 21:13:15 GMT
That is a really good tip about mixing the eggs and sugar together for 4-5 mins as I always wonder how long to actually whisk these for. I will try this method tomorrow as I am baking 100 cup cakes for a friend's party.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2011 21:26:09 GMT
I forgot to ask how many cup cakes does this mixture make please?

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2011 13:06:53 GMT
M. Jones says:
I had a go at making cupcakes with this recipe but I only divided it into 12 cases. I ended up with very large cupcakes which spread over the tops. How many should this mix make? Thanks

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Nov 2011 12:14:32 GMT
Peach and coconut. msg me if you,d like the recipe.
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Discussion in:  cooking discussion forum
Participants:  42
Total posts:  58
Initial post:  22 May 2010
Latest post:  30 Apr 2012

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