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Halogen Oven


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Initial post: 10 Sep 2010 14:26:15 BDT
I bought a Halogen Oven from JML, it had a cookbook with it but not many, or very varied recipes, which I'd like as I'd like to be able to use it more. Can anyone help, please??

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2010 10:48:09 BDT
J Dixon says:
There is a cookbook on the ideal world website - i got it for my halogen. great book and easy recipes.
hope that helps

Posted on 13 Sep 2010 15:45:31 BDT
Halogen ovens are meant to be used instead of or in conjunction with your main oven, there are no real specific recipes for them. Anything you can cook in your main oven can be cooked in the halogen, it just uses less power to cook. So you can cook roast dishes, i.e potatoes, vegetables, meat, or casseroles, even bake in them, the only criteria is if it fits. A friend of mine uses one in the caravan and cooks of full Sunday lunch.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2010 20:45:45 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 11 Jun 2012 01:31:02 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Sep 2010 02:14:41 BDT
"Heat is heat?"

The JML halogen oven does use less power than your old Bosch, since it's a table-top 1300 Watt cooker that plugs into a standard 13 Amp socket. I think the ovens you describe (with "grill functions", "insulation" and "door seals") are designed for 35 Amp cooker power circuits. Halogen heaters also don't do "exactly the same job", since they reach their operating temperature near instantaneously - far more quickly than "conventional elements". Perhaps you'd have done better to read up on the halogen cooker mentioned here, before wading in with your mis-directed assertions.

In the case of the JML oven, there is less space to heat, since the oven is really a large glass bowl with a light in the lid. Such apparatus is indeed more efficient than a conventional oven, since there is less area within the oven to keep heated.

Perhaps people in the market for these ovens would not have the space to accomodate your double-ovened preference. Don't you wonder if insulation materials development and power conversion efficiency technology have improved in 26 years? Bon apetit!

]

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Sep 2010 12:01:42 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 11 Jun 2012 01:30:40 BDT]

Posted on 16 Sep 2010 20:47:01 BDT
Margo says:
I had to buy halogen oven as I didn't have normal one in the house where we've moved. It's now more than a year that I use it. In the beginning I was absolutely excited, since I missed true oven dishes, now I don't use it every day but still on the regular basis.
No particular recipes for the halogen, you can always use normal recipes.
Love roast chicken in there, it's extremely juicy and crunchy brown outside - take one good chicken, smear it well with mayonnaise, herbs and salt and roast a bit more than one hour at around 180-190C. You'll need to turn it once. Instead of mayonnaise, you can use olive oil or other stuff, but mayo is delicious. Oh, and put halves of raw potatoes on the grid around your chicken, they will roast too and will take perfect taste of juice that'll come from chicken.. yummy

And just one tip. Whatever you prepare in the halogen that needs to bake through - cakes, one pot etc, cover the pot or the bake form firmly with foil for first 30 min (you can pick holes to let the steam go out if needed but keep the foil bound to the borders so it won't fly away). Remove the foil and continue cooking. It'll extend a bit the cooking time but ensures it's cooked through. Otherwise the top can burn and the bottom will stay raw. At least, I can't do another way with my halogen. Bon appetit!

Posted on 24 Oct 2010 16:39:36 BDT
flowergirl says:
why do people insist on using foil? Turn the heat down and cook for a fraction longer. Halogen ovens are great, but don't try to use it as a fast alternative to the microwave. It is an oven - treat it just like a very efficient oven and you will get great results.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2010 21:50:57 BDT
P. J. Henry says:
We have a halogen oven and find it excellent. I borrowed a few books from the library and then decided which we wanted to buy. Far and away the best we found was Halogen Cooking Made Simple by Paul Brodel and Dee Hunwicks and we got it from..... Amazon! Good recipes in a spiral bound format. Only tip to give you is don't believe all the hype about timing. We find it IS quicker but not by the amount suggested. Enjoy.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Oct 2010 22:14:43 BDT
Hi, thanks to everyone for the responses. I've now moved house & don't really need the Halogen Oven but do Appreciate the feed back as the Oven is now going to my Son-in-Law for Xmas. Thanks P.J.Henry I'll get the book to give along with the Cooker ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Oct 2010 16:23:46 BDT
Last edited by the author on 26 Oct 2010 16:30:42 BDT
Debs.H. says:
I bought a large Hologen oven with the flip up lid. I thought I was buying something that was 'fast' to cook, which is how it is advertsied. As someone above stated it is no faster than a normal oven so I was disapointed. As for old products against new, how I wish I had kept my twenty three year old Belling Format 4. Recently replaced with the new all singing all dancing Belling. It isn't a patch on the old one for quality. The oven is smaller, there are only two shelves instead of the four in my previous oven. It has been stripped down to save money no doubt. I wish companies would realise that some people would pay extra to keep the quality that their old products had.

Posted on 26 Oct 2010 22:00:42 BDT
Mrs K W says:
Just used my new Prolectrix 12L oven and did some chicken breasts.Very impressed ,I need to experiment though as it's the first thing and I was a bit nervous. As for it cooking faster it did a bit ,but the reason I got this was that the running cost compared to a fan oven that has to heat up a good 5 mins at least before it gets to the right temperature,must be a lot less,and that has to save on the electric bill.Also got this from Morrisons on offer at just 39 including lid holder 2 racks and tongs to get the hot racks out,and because I had a 5 voucher from the petrol stations it only cost me 34.

Posted on 3 Nov 2010 15:08:34 GMT
I bought my halogen over a year ago this summer, and it is never off. My 72 year old father has even been converted and uses it for his lunches, when I'm at work. I got mine from Ideal World. I never noticed on the tv that the lid didn't come off - as I assumed it was the same as the JML type. I was disappointed for about 5 minutes as I was expecting the inside to come out - so as to serve from table, but as this version has a hinged lid - you don't have to have a separate lid and lid holder on your kitchen surfaces. If getting this version - you just need to have height above to fully open lid up. I have cooked rolled lamb, whole large chicken - as this version comes with extender included to raise height again - whereas most other models have it as an optional extra. I hate my regular oven, especially the grill - so my halogen is never off - the grill function is excellent. I now have bacon just the way I like it - crispy. My dad cooks ready meals in it. The cooking time on mine is much less than a standard oven. Baked potatoes can be done in 30-40 minutes at between 200-250C. The temp goes from 150C - 250C. There is also a thaw feature which I had forgotten and only recently realised. So now I just bring things straight from freezer and thaw first - that way if I have to change the menu - no food gets wasted. The Ideal World one is marketed under the name "cookshop". I just ordered last week an accessories kit for minw from Coopers of Stratford from Amazon for 14.99 - which included spair non stick dish, steamer, extendable ring - and my main reason for getting - a 10 rack toaster - for making a large load of toast for a big group. A few extra large xmas brunches coming up for when all the family turns up. I got mine on a special offer - it was 49.99 - it's normally sold at 59.99 - so me being a canny scot I couldn't pass up on an offer like that. I should also say that there are millions of books available online for halogen ovens. In america there marketed as convection ovens, as they are in effect a potable convection oven. One good book I puchased is from the chef Paul Brodel who regularly demonstrates cooking with the halogen on said tv channel. My favourite recipe of his is got to be his potato and sausage breakfast. His ratatouille, quick tandoori masala chicken and stuffed potato skins are also excellent. I should also mention that they demonstrate on tv if you put in washing-up liqiud and warm water and set to thaw feature - it will self-clean. The Jml version has a bit named wash - but on mine its the thaw feature. I personally don't bother. I use a heavy duty teflon coated wipeable sheet on base of glass bottom and wipe excess, and if worst comes to worst - everything gets fired in dishwasher - 2 grill stands, non stick dish and glass bowl. I was sceptical as to how much I would use mine , as I have bought other things that just take up cupboard space. It's permanently on my kitchen surface, and I now find I'm eating healthier too, as the steamed veg is brilliant in it. With this item and my wok I can't go wrong, and have recently purchased the tefal actifry to have my healthy chips with a teaspoon of oil. Same place stocks that too. I'm not an agent for them by the way LOL.

Posted on 8 Nov 2010 13:43:47 GMT
Has anyone else experienced problems with the cracked glass bowl! I purchased mine just over a week ago-Used it for the first time today, put it in warm soapy water to wash and it literally cracked in half-Im so upset-cost me 49 pounds! Was this a defect in the manufacture of the glass bowl-bought through amazon-Eletro world Market Place.
Max

Posted on 11 Nov 2010 19:58:51 GMT
Last edited by the author on 11 Nov 2010 20:01:43 GMT
I've just bought a halogen oven and cooked stuffed trout on high rack to perfection. However I wasn't very successful with the veg on the bottom rack. I cooked the new potatoes for 30 minutes and the snap peas, green beans and baby corn for 15 minutes underneath the trout. I wrapped them in foil and sprinkled with water before making a parcel of themThey were not cooked very well at all. I put a bit of water under the bottom rack. What am I doing wrong?
Your reply to T. E. MacFarlane's post:
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In reply to an earlier post on 11 Nov 2010 20:13:27 GMT
Hi,
You say your steamed veg are brilliant in it. How do you do it? Mine were not cooked through at all

Posted on 12 Nov 2010 10:33:45 GMT
J. E. Michie says:
I am living in Beijing at the moment and none of the apartments come with an oven - the Chinese don't seem to bake or roast, except Peking Duck and that is always done in specialist restaurants! So my entire cooking equipment consists of a double halogen hob (very efficient) an electric rice steamer, a kettle and a microwave. I am desparate to have a proper roast and even do the occasional bit of baking. I looked at the reviews of halogen ovens on-line, and thought one of them would solve my problem. But guess what, they are all made in China but they are not SOLD in China - nowhere here has them, I've been to all the big electrical stores, kitchenware shops etc. It is so frustrating.
As I'm coming back to the UK for Xmas I want to order one now and bring it back out with me - but which to buy? once I get it here I would be stuck if the light went and/or the bowl cracked. Would like advice from those of you with experience as to which models you have found reliable.

Posted on 27 Nov 2010 19:39:08 GMT
goldilocks says:
hi
i have an Halagon oven i wouldn't be without mine
J. E. Michie you should let it wash its self out if you read the instruction's it tells how to do that also it defrost's thats in the instruction's now looks like you will have to go out and buy another one

Gillian Newton also if you want the recipe book just ring JML they would be more than happy to assist you

T E Mcfarlane put your veg in foil thats another way of steaming them or in a plastic container that tells you in the instruction's don't no why yours didn't cook properly can't be useing it properly

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Nov 2010 01:07:08 GMT
Sunshine says:
I have a similar meter to yours and have had it in place for nearly two years, and I can confirm that the Halogen oven uses significantly less electricity than my conventional oven - (by approximately 2/3rds). In fact, since buying my Halogen oven I have only used my conventional oven once - and that was simply because what I was cooking was too large for the halogen one, even with its extender ring in place. And by the way, fixing the power meter is not at all difficult - anyone with a modicum of common sense can do it, so you don't need to be a qualified electrician to fit one. The instructions that are supplied with it are perfectly clear and straightforward. I also have a couple of induction hobs, and these too are wonderful and very fast - much faster than my gas hob, and I can also set a timer on these and walk away and do something else whilst simmering food, rather than have to stand over it. If I could have found a full size induction hob to fit where my gas hob is, I would have bought one, but since I coould not, I did not want to have to fit new work tops to my designer kitchen and the induction hobs just slide away into a cupboard when not in use.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Dec 2010 09:56:01 GMT
Last edited by the author on 23 Dec 2010 10:06:10 GMT
Mr. Il Coyne says:
reply M J Clarke
should have let it cool first, I'm sure it warns you in the instructions be careful with water. Mine does
If it wasn't hot, then it would have had a small defect : )

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Dec 2010 22:19:55 GMT
jayne says:
got a halogen along with a actifry by tefal and agree with almost all of the responses you have recieved yes ideal world who really started the craze to get halogen do now have two cooks aviable and you are able to buy online but all ican suggest is use your imagination

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2010 11:32:02 GMT
Heat is not 'just heat'
In a good oven, heat is either evenly distributed, or, even better, it's hotter at the top and cooler at the bottom.

Fan assisted ovens make sure the heat is even which can help if you want to cook similar items on all shelves. Fan assisted ovens usually give you the option to turn the fan off so you can have differing temperature zones in the oven.

Halogen ovens do not rely on only convected heat ( which is 'spread about' inside the oven ) It gives RADIATED heat. Radiated heat delivers the energy directly to the food without heating the air around it. The air is heated as a secondary effect, I.E. convection from the food, dish and surfaces of the oven.
In other words, more heat arrives to the food quicker, meaning the surface can be cooked while the inside is not.

This is why you need to turn it down, allowing less heat to the food, increasing cooking time and giving chance for the heat to convect to the interior of the food.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2010 19:19:38 GMT
In my oven, as well as being a fan oven, it can also be a grill, or convector oven with heat from bottom and top, or a combination of fan with grill, or just the heat from the third element around the fan. The insulation is superb and it takes several hours to cool if the door is left shut. With fan it heats up very quickly, taking just a few minutes to stabilise at our usual cooking temperatures.

So the heat can be applied as required, any common type of cooking is possible. And according to the most recent test I did with my Owl thingy it is quite economical, it cost about 8p to roast a 2 kilo chicken and some potatoes and parsnips yesterday. We are about to replace the oven, and I don't think the flashy new one is going to be as good as the boring old one - so I am gathering ammunition to back up any complaints with the supplier.

Hence why (before I realised the halogen ovens in question were tiny, see my later post) I could see no significant advantage.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2010 19:33:05 GMT
"so I am gathering ammunition to back up any complaints with the supplier."
Would it not be more prudent instead to spend the time giving the new supplier your required specifications rather than pre empting ways to complain to them? Considering you haven't bought the product yet!

Or do you simply enjoy complaining?

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2010 23:42:53 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 11 Jun 2012 01:34:21 BDT]
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