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Benny Hill considered funnier than Monty Python by two TV stations---READ!!!!!!!!!!!


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Showing 1-25 of 345 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 12 Jul 2011 16:20:20 BDT
Man of truth says:
The stations were WOR and WLVI! According to the book Benny Hill Story by John Smith!

Posted on 12 Jul 2011 17:10:51 BDT
Cactus Dave says:
Never!

Posted on 12 Jul 2011 17:16:21 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Jul 2011 17:18:37 BDT
Man of truth says:
The reason why Hill was indeed funnier than Pyton is 100% likely was because he was from a show-biz family! And I don't think the Pythons were! One has no choice but to accept that Hill considered funnier than Python given the evidence, Oakley, you can't have your own facts on this subject! Python had a lot of missed timing and amateurish acting! Hill was in superb, professional comedy when the Pythons were all still in high school--he was far better at the business than them!

Posted on 12 Jul 2011 17:38:54 BDT
Cactus Dave says:
Your opinion

Posted on 28 Jul 2011 23:24:28 BDT
Its considered " COOL " to like monty python..but in fact it was a load of crap...benny hill however was just straight forward laughs all the way.

Posted on 30 Jul 2011 20:53:59 BDT
Mrs Pisaroni says:
When I was in my teens and Monty Python were THE thing I laughed til' I cried at them. Subsequently I have watched again and fully agree with Dale Paterson- Total crap- guess my parents were right all along!

Posted on 30 Jul 2011 20:59:53 BDT
RAB says:
HM, are you related to Dragonlord by any chance?

Posted on 30 Jul 2011 21:23:28 BDT
M. White says:
(Some of) Python was great at the time but has it hasn't aged well

Posted on 6 Aug 2011 10:45:40 BDT
Last edited by the author on 6 Aug 2011 10:48:10 BDT
Chris says:
I am on the UK site aren't I? Benny Hill and Monty Python's Flying Circus; two series that were never repeated on terrestrial British TV, with good reason.
With Python you have to separate the movies which are great from the TV series which contains a ton of garbage wiht some real gems that are worth the trouble of watching all the cack for.
All I can remember from Benny Hill were some very silly sketches involving half naked women chasing him at high speed. There must have been more to his comedy than that, but the fact that it was never repeated, when shows such as Porridge, Fawlty Towers etc were makes me think probably not much more.
Though that could be due to the fact that sketch shows don't age well.

In short, Flying Circus and Benny Hill are nowhere near the best of what British comedy has to offer. Why they're still held up as benchmarks of British comedy in the US has always bemused me, but here in the UK... I'm gobsmacked.

Posted on 10 Aug 2011 17:13:29 BDT
Last edited by the author on 10 Aug 2011 17:14:07 BDT
JONESY says:
I can't believe this post.
Benny f---ing Hill ???????. Python's humour is twisted and surreal. Hill was a fat gurning twot. (And not funny either)

Posted on 1 Sep 2011 20:24:52 BDT
DeeJay says:
"Why they're still held up as benchmarks of British comedy in the US has always bemused me"

Because America had nothing like them at the time, and years later have never really had anything like them.

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Sep 2011 20:51:13 BDT
Last edited by the author on 1 Sep 2011 20:51:58 BDT
Demosthenes says:
Jonesy you should actually watch programmes before commenting. I suspect you have never seen a Benny Hill show in your life.

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Sep 2011 20:58:45 BDT
Last edited by the author on 1 Sep 2011 20:59:03 BDT
LEP says:
I don't see how you can compare the 2. Nothing really alike.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Sep 2011 15:50:20 BDT
Nugent Dirt says:
Agreed. Sketch shows date very quickly as they usually depend on taking the p*ss out of contemporary politicians, fads and celebs, 99% of whom have drifted back into obscurity. As for MP, for every good sketch that's stood the test of time there are 10 that have dated or that were'nt funny in the first place. BH was just end of the pier lowest common denominator humour that appealed to non English speakers, When I lived in Croatia in the mid 1990s the BH show was the second most popular TV programme....after Santa Barbara!

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Sep 2011 10:54:18 BDT
Bonedamage says:
I think you mean 'straight backward'.

Posted on 11 Sep 2011 10:28:47 BDT
It's all personal opinion, but I never found Monty Python at all funny. For me, it was rather Emporer's New Clothes - some people said "wow, this is amazing", and suddenly everyone loves them!

I really enjoyed Benny Hill - not clever in the sense that MP was always considered, but I don't think entertainment needs to be anything other than there to pleasure the viewer.

Benny Hill for me all the time...

Posted on 11 Sep 2011 11:39:07 BDT
Last edited by the author on 11 Sep 2011 11:40:43 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
I'm not in the least surprised that people prefer Benny Hill, It was simplistic to the point of childishness and featured scantily clad women before 'page 3' did. What it didn't attempt to do was push comedy forward, it was safe. Unlike Python which was always going to be hit and miss as it attempted 'and now for something completely different'.
The most straightforward, simple and accessible works always seem to manifest themselves as the most popular.
By the same reasoning I think Pop (popular) music should be renamed In (inane) music.

Posted on 12 Sep 2011 20:21:17 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Sep 2011 20:24:48 BDT
Lector says:
As always, it's a matter of personal taste of course, but I agree with these two stations! I'm probably the only person in the world who never got into the Python's comedy and still can not for the most part. Like the so-called 'great', 'groundbreaking' 'Young Ones', it just ain't my thing. But then I'm not into comedy necessarily because it ('supposedly'?) breaks new ground or is P.C. inclined or not. Essentially I just find somthing funny or I don't, whatever the orginal origin of the material. Oh and just because I Benny and I were born in the same city, Southampton, I'm really not biased either, as I can think of many other comedians, from Britain and abroad, whom I prefer to him.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Sep 2011 20:42:02 BDT
Lector says:
M.C. Hi, Well if we are going to talk about "childishness" in comedy, Monty Python had plenty of that in their shows, like-wise 'The Young Ones'! But that is an essential ingredient of comedy anyway! I mean what do you think the likes the old comedians were doing eg, 60 years ago, eg' Max Miller, Arthur Askey et al? And Benny Hills' shows weren't "safe"! Far from it. Many people were actually offended by it! I dare say eg. that as many of Mary Whitehouse's inclination were, as were for Monty Python's work. Also, I think you are perpetuating the often completely misunderstood significance of 'pop' music. Some people have a snobbish attitude to this. And there is no such thing as a pure sound either. Everything in music is evolving and is influenced by other sounds. It doesn't matter whether it's Jazz, pop, blues, rock, soul or whatever. But 'pop music' is just that, music which is popular. All kinds, including those I've mentioned previously have appeared many times in the so-called 'pop charts', simply because they were (and still are are) considered popular by many people.

Posted on 12 Sep 2011 23:46:34 BDT
Personally, I like comedy with a pronounced zany streak and, for me, both Python and Benny hit that note in many of their sketches and with a good few of their characters. So guess I am pretty firmly on the fence as regards this debate. The evolution of comedy should record that both made significant contributions to the artform.

Posted on 13 Sep 2011 12:16:02 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
Lector, I couldn't agree more with your statement "It doesn't matter whether it's Jazz, pop, blues, rock, soul or whatever. But 'pop music' is just that, music which is popular. All kinds, including those I've mentioned previously have appeared many times in the so-called 'pop charts', simply because they were (and still are are) considered popular by many people".

My point of view is that not many, if any, of those chart bound songs were the best output by the artist. sure, some had a naturally wide appeal but most would have constructed those particular songs for completely commercial reasons. Popular doesn't equate to quality in my book. That isn't to say I can't appreciate a stunningly well constructed pop tune or T.V. programme it's just the best work isn't usually prime-time or chart-topping, wouldn't you agree?
Cheers
MC

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2011 12:32:15 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Sep 2011 12:34:28 BDT
Lector says:
M.C.W, Hi again. Ok, now I can see better what you meant. I do agree with you to some extent there. Although, in theory anyway, you would think that it would make sense for the-powers- that-be to try to ensure that an artiste's "best work" would be the more commercial! It's a strange scene, I mean I am a huge Beatles fan, mainly - though not exclusively - of their early to mid-period work, I have to say, but I wouldn't rate, for my own personal tastes, the 'Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band' L.P. in my top Beatles favourite albums list at all. And yet people say that is their most creative, non-commercial work. And yet as we know, it reached number 1 in the album charts. Ummm... Well, it all comes down to personal taste I suppose, commercial or otherwise...

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2011 15:18:10 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
Lector, although I get the gist of what you are saying re: best work being the most commercial but surely it would defy most artists raison d'etre. The average Joe wants a 3 minute uplifting experience, a couple of verses with a chorus put to a catchy hook, while most artists want to delve deeper both musically and personally in an attempt to
express their art. Therefore it stands to reason that what most artists (and fans) consider their finest achievements will not be captured in that constrained form.
Again a lot of people like something that is instantly connectable while others prefer to take a more considered approach. Each to his own, as you say.
Cheers
MC

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2011 15:40:34 BDT
Lector says:
M.C.W. Ok, rodger that. Actually to be honest with you, I quite, like a bit of a catchy tune myself! "Somewhere over the rainbow...la la la--a". Oh sorry, wrong key - again! Once more Maestro, please! I thank you! ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2011 15:47:42 BDT
Last edited by the author on 13 Sep 2011 15:48:36 BDT
MC Zaptone says:
The infectious Ya Ya (press blue writing) for me!!!
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Discussion in:  comedy discussion forum
Participants:  80
Total posts:  345
Initial post:  12 Jul 2011
Latest post:  10 days ago

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