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any suggestions for a new read


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Initial post: 4 Oct 2009 12:19:38 BDT
wombat says:
Need suggestions, favourite authors are Maggie O'Farrell, Barbara Trapido, Anita Shreve (not all books), Rose Tremain - any advice?

Posted on 6 Oct 2009 11:13:32 BDT
Scott J says:
A Cheerful Depression: An Autobiography An excellent read from a new author. Compelling, moving and an interesting insight into depression

Posted on 6 Oct 2009 12:22:05 BDT
Mrs. A. Keys says:
How about Acid Row by Minette Walters. Full of action and intrigue.

Posted on 7 Oct 2009 08:26:29 BDT
Last edited by the author on 7 Oct 2009 08:29:25 BDT
P. Murray says:
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Posted on 14 Oct 2009 09:42:40 BDT
kb walker says:
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Posted on 14 Oct 2009 12:56:04 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 14 Oct 2009 12:56:43 BDT]

Posted on 14 Oct 2009 14:34:29 BDT
C. Walduck says:
Slimmer Charlie

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Oct 2009 19:01:11 BDT
Bookworm says:
Have a look at Maya Angelou "I know why the caged bird sings" and the books that follow it. What a fascinating life she has lead.

Posted on 16 Oct 2009 19:51:06 BDT
john adams by david macculogh . was published a few years ago but still great

Posted on 27 Oct 2009 00:26:42 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 27 Oct 2009 00:28:40 GMT]

Posted on 27 Oct 2009 00:29:32 GMT
This is my current favourite -
Prisoners, Property and Prostitutes: And Other Things Beginning with P

Posted on 27 Oct 2009 15:01:46 GMT
Last edited by the author on 27 Oct 2009 15:18:56 GMT
CP James says:
Terence Frisby's 'Kisses on a Postcard', a touching, and at times very funny account of him and his older brother Jack, aged seven and eleven, as WWII evacuees to the Cornish hamlet of Doublebois. There they lived for three years with `Uncle Jack', a former Welsh miner with good old-Labour views, and his warm-hearted wife `Auntie Rose'. A charming, uplifting book. Kisses on a Postcard: A Tale of Wartime Childhood

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Oct 2009 12:35:06 GMT
waterfall says:
The Road Home - Rose Tremain - good read but you prob have already had this one.

Posted on 31 Oct 2009 00:56:31 GMT
D. Shaw says:
Try 'The Little House' phillipa Gregory (its non historical)
The Little House

Or
The Tea Rose

Posted on 31 Oct 2009 09:40:33 GMT
Last edited by the author on 31 Oct 2009 09:41:28 GMT
Valerie Cole says:
How to be Adoredhow to be adored by caroline cox - v.funny, loads of good stories about stars, their lives and their style, great cover too!

Posted on 31 Oct 2009 14:17:29 GMT
Last edited by the author on 31 Oct 2009 14:18:56 GMT
I'm reading Olympic Gangster: The Legend of Jose Beyaert - Cycling Champion, Fortune Hunter and Outlaw by Matt Rendell, and I'd recommend it.

(Yes, I am related to him, but nevertheless it's a fascinating read).

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2009 23:41:22 GMT
Aurora says:
I like those authors too, have you tried Helen Dunmore or Alice Sebold?

Posted on 7 Nov 2009 11:22:18 GMT
Last edited by the author on 7 Nov 2009 11:23:39 GMT
gilly8 says:
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold, which is being made into a movie (something which always frightens me, in regard to books I really like!). This is fiction, btw.


The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein, yes, I keep going around recommending it and neither wrote it, know the author or get a kick-back from raving over it!!! ;--) Also fiction, but perfect in tone/ feelings.

All over but the Shoutin' and it's sequel "Ava's Man" by Rick Bragg. Non-fiction. Wonderfully written, intense, bio of himself and his sibilings growing up raised by a his poor but hard working mother, in the Deep South in the ?1930's or '40's. Their family were "poor white trash" in the terms of that time...and also a term unfortunately still heard today. His story is somewhat an "Angela's Ashes" for the poor whites of the South, but not as beautfully written (what is?). Still, two great books with a picture of a way of life most of us can't imagine.

Posted on 7 Nov 2009 11:36:48 GMT
Last edited by the author on 7 Nov 2009 11:38:17 GMT
Try "Three Cups of Tea" by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin. Here's the description from Amazon: "'Here we drink three cups of tea to do business; the first you are a stranger, the second you become a friend, and the third, you join our family, and for our family we are prepared to do anything - even die' - Haji Ali, Korphe Village Chief, Karakoram mountains, Pakistan. In 1993, after a terrifying and disastrous attempt to climb K2, a mountaineer called Greg Mortenson drifted, cold and dehydrated, into an impoverished Pakistan village in the Karakoram Mountains. Moved by the inhabitants' kindness, he promised to return and build a school. "Three Cups of Tea" is the story of that promise and its extraordinary outcome. Over the next decade Mortenson built not just one but fifty-five schools - especially for girls - in remote villages across the forbidding and breathtaking landscape of Pakistan and Afghanistan, just as the Taliban rose to power. His story is at once a riveting adventure and a testament to the power of the humanitarian spirit."
It's a great book - and should be essential reading for schoolchildren and politicians.

Posted on 7 Nov 2009 13:23:57 GMT
Last edited by the author on 7 Nov 2009 16:16:46 GMT
Carol Arnall says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 7 Nov 2009 16:33:04 GMT
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In reply to an earlier post on 7 Nov 2009 21:49:33 GMT
read your suggestion and would you mind if I recomended "disruptive" by Angela Bayley with Eric Swanepoel. Its a gripping read and gives an in depth insite to all mental health issues as well as depression. The book is available for pre order and is due to be released at the end of the month. Strongly advise anyone to read it Disruptive: How I Triumphed Over Years of Abuse from Those Who Were Supposed to Protect Me

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2009 10:48:58 GMT
The Toucan lodge by Carlos Mundy

Posted on 9 Nov 2009 17:02:50 GMT
T. Cooper says:
Trust No One by Teresa Cooper :-)Trust No One

Posted on 21 Nov 2009 19:05:38 GMT
sharon says:
just finished reading All in the Mind by Alastair Campbell excellent read couldnt put it down compelling,moving with a twist
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