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Good true crime books?


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Showing 1-25 of 182 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 18 Sep 2010 14:59:39 BDT
What are the best you're read?

Posted on 20 Sep 2010 11:29:17 BDT
Last edited by the author on 20 Sep 2010 12:48:36 BDT
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Posted on 21 Sep 2010 10:24:21 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 18 Sep 2012 21:32:15 BDT]

Posted on 23 Sep 2010 16:46:31 BDT
Aussie J says:
No Time to Cry Tales of a Leicester Bouncer

Posted on 23 Sep 2010 16:50:16 BDT
K. Cowling says:
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: or the Murder at Road Hill House by Kate Summerscale
both books excellent

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Sep 2010 00:43:30 BDT
The Suspicions of Mr Whicher is over-rated. I know it won some literary prize but in terms of actually revealing any new information like whodunnit it contains nothing new.

Posted on 27 Sep 2010 10:39:37 BDT
'Crossfire' by sam and chuck giancana.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Sep 2010 20:04:40 BDT
Marching Powder by Rusty Young.

Posted on 1 Oct 2010 16:20:16 BDT
HOODS by Carl Felstrom is a really good read. Relates to crime and drug dealing in Nottingham.

Posted on 2 Oct 2010 21:14:54 BDT
Kirsty says:
Fred and Rose by Howard Sounes - He actually reported on the story as it broke onto the news, he has some great insights

Posted on 9 Oct 2010 04:06:21 BDT
oddly enough my faves are the True Crime books by Colin Wilson. Compendiums of Crime with some of the most bizarre and shocking crimes Ive come across

Posted on 9 Oct 2010 17:27:30 BDT
Last edited by the author on 9 Oct 2010 17:31:24 BDT
This is the one I'm reading now, and it's fascinating; 501 Most Notorious Crimes (True Crime) by Paul Donnelley. It's like an encyclopedia of gruesome crimes, and it's not just murders. It covers everything from hoaxes and swindles, to assassinations and kidnappings. There's a short synopsis of each dastardly deed, just enough to whet the appetite and make you want to know more. There's many crimes I hadn't heard of before and its worth it for these alone. Also this book is packed with photos, that bring the stories to life.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Oct 2010 15:32:18 BDT
Stracs says:
"Columbine" by Dave Cullen is excellent, definately the best of the books on the Columbine Massacre. "Supper with the Crippens" by David James Smith is well worth a read, as is Carol Ann Lee's "One of your own: the life and death of Myra Hindley".

Posted on 18 Oct 2010 12:28:03 BDT
Mr. M. Grant says:
Homicide by David Simon. (Creator or tv series The Wire)
A year in the life of a Homicide Department in Baltimore. Slow start, but rewarding in the end.

Posted on 18 Oct 2010 20:12:07 BDT
boss of bosses: how one man saved the sicilian mafia. A bio of bernardo provenano, a mercurial, crafty and highly intelligent mafia boss who evaded capture for over 40 years. An excellent read

Posted on 18 Oct 2010 20:13:07 BDT
Last edited by the author on 18 Oct 2010 21:00:18 BDT
*bernardo provenzano

Posted on 26 Oct 2010 17:59:54 BDT
S POLLARD says:
+1 for In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Oct 2010 20:25:07 BDT
Forgot to mention this one about the notorious Mafia crime boss John Gotti and his gang. Easy to read and unputdownable: Mobster: Improbable Rise and Fall of John Gotti and His Gang

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Oct 2010 21:23:09 BDT
there's a great book which sort of prequels the days of the Krays, Britain's Godfather, by Edward T. Hart, great read.

Posted on 26 Oct 2010 21:45:29 BDT
Simon Andrew says:
I'll second Mr M. Grant's recommendation of Homicide by David Simon. The book can be a little heavy going in places, but the subject matter engrosses the reader, especially as the book progresses so this isn't a huge problem. A real strength of David Simon, in both is non-fiction writing and in The Wire is his character building, you'll feel like you actually know the main homicide detectives as friends/colleagues by the end of the book.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2010 10:53:31 GMT
C. Mcsloy says:
James Ellroys- My Dark Places is the greatest true crime book ever written. I can prove it on a pocket calculator.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2010 11:35:27 GMT
D. Shortland says:
A recent book is We are not manslaughterers, a book about the murder of a policeman by canadian soldiers in Epsom at the end of the first world war. A really good read, and exposes a conspiracy involving the royal family to cover up the murder. Its written by Martin Knight, quite cheap on amazon as well.

Posted on 3 Nov 2010 04:51:20 GMT
One that can truly be called a classic in true crime: Ten Rillington Place by the late Ludovic Kennedy. A book that actually resulted in a conviction being overturned: unfortunately too late for the man who was executed for Christie's crimes

Posted on 7 Nov 2010 12:02:05 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 23 Nov 2010 13:51:09 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Nov 2010 06:10:34 GMT
Stan says:
"The Reluctant Villain" is AWSOME.It is the true story of a man's life in a little known criminal organization in Canada.
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