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Best Biography?


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Showing 201-225 of 465 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jun 2010 20:20:58 BDT
Well I loved Paul O'Gradys biography At my mothers knee. It made me cry, laugh out loud and pulled my heart strings the fact that I think he is a lovely man could mean I am biased or the act that my own life being similar in age was very similar in my childhood. But for an intersting look back in time and how life was and how even having no money made you happy please read this.

Posted on 15 Jun 2010 12:24:48 BDT
Ame Edwards says:
Definately the most interesting biography i've ever read is Michael J Fox - Lucky Man. I didn't expect it to be so deep, but I found it refreshing to learn about his life in a mor serious manor, whilst still being entertained.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jun 2010 21:32:42 BDT
[[ASIN:0718149726 Bermondsey Boy: Memories of a Forgotten World]
I have read many biographies, this is one of the best, I learnt a lot of how life was around the war from this book.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Jun 2010 21:35:07 BDT
Yes I agree with both choices.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2010 09:15:42 BDT
MP Purcell says:
Walking To Rome

Try this one it is an up to date true story.

Posted on 24 Jun 2010 17:52:42 BDT
long walk to freedom nelson mandela

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Jun 2010 18:32:53 BDT
Robo says:
the maxwell bros

Posted on 25 Jun 2010 15:57:03 BDT
John Martin says:
Well,odf course, it is my own: John martin : the Man Himself, a Life of Jonathan Swift.

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Jul 2010 23:31:14 BDT
Leone Frieda has written a BRILLIANT bio of the life of Catherine de Medici, who left Italy as a young woman, married the Dauphin of France and effectively ruled France for most of her adult life. The detail of court life, intrigues, extravagances and political difficulties are vividly described. A fascinating evocation of the period. I couldn't put it down until I'd ploughed through to the end!

Posted on 3 Jul 2010 09:12:13 BDT
Morphybum says:
Anything by Claire Tomalin

Posted on 7 Jul 2010 16:55:28 BDT
Cricket has always been a rich source of biography - but few books can have matched Duncan Hamilton's book on Harold Larwood. Not only informative on a career that peaked in the infamous bodyline series but then a tale of betrayal and ultimate redemption. This book explodes a few myths along the way and helps explain the class system which seemed so epidemic in the day. However the fact that public school officers and captains take the working class off to war or Ashes battles still lingers...this is a book that still resonates after nearly 80 years.

Posted on 8 Jul 2010 09:56:53 BDT
My most recently purchased biography and one which I found most moving is Mud, Blood and Bullets by Edward Rowbotham edited by Janet Tucker, which is the story of one Black Country miner who joined the South Staffordshire Regiment during the First World War and was transferred to the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps. The biography is written around Edward Rowbotham's own memoirs which have an openness and honesty which mark them as totally genuine. Edward's modesty makes his winning the Military Medal all the more of a triumph for someone from a large poor family. As a social commentary the book is invaluable viewing, as it does the conflict from the bottom up, as a simple tale of the horrors of the war it cannot be bettered.Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front

Posted on 8 Jul 2010 09:56:59 BDT
My most recently purchased biography and one which I found most moving is Mud, Blood and Bullets by Edward Rowbotham edited by Janet Tucker, which is the story of one Black Country miner who joined the South Staffordshire Regiment during the First World War and was transferred to the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps. The biography is written around Edward Rowbotham's own memoirs which have an openness and honesty which mark them as totally genuine. Edward's modesty makes his winning the Military Medal all the more of a triumph for someone from a large poor family. As a social commentary the book is invaluable viewing, as it does the conflict from the bottom up, as a simple tale of the horrors of the war it cannot be bettered.Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Jul 2010 19:06:54 BDT
Last edited by the author on 8 Jul 2010 19:08:40 BDT
Re Paul O'Grady.At My Mother's Knee ...: and Other Low Joints
I agree wholeheartedly, I am on the last few pages, I can relate to a lot of his childhood memories.
Life really was like that. There are lots of laugh out loud moments in the book. Paul has gone up a lot in my estimation after reading this, I look forward to his follow up book.

Posted on 9 Jul 2010 19:28:29 BDT
Robert Caro's 'The Power Broker' is absolutely amazing; don't be put off by the length.
The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York (Urban studies & biography)

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Jul 2010 14:41:25 BDT
SLOU3 says:
Robert Kennedy'sRobert Kennedy

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Jul 2010 19:54:51 BDT
honestjane says:
Have you read Zappa's autobiography? It is fantastic, laugh-out-loud funny and paints an hysterical picture of the Royal Philharmonic orchestra and the English judiciary system. And I am British!

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Jul 2010 22:10:28 BDT
MP Purcell says:
Walking to Rome by Vincent J. Purcell

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Jul 2010 22:10:30 BDT
MP Purcell says:
Walking to Rome by Vincent J. Purcell

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jul 2010 19:54:29 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Jul 2010 20:05:47 BDT
I agree with you FDJ, This book touched me profoundly, I can`t look at it without feeling tremendous sympathy for this much troubled, brilliant musician

Posted on 17 Aug 2010 10:00:00 BDT
Last edited by the author on 17 Aug 2010 10:01:39 BDT
Always a Marine: The Return to Civvy Street

The best biography has to be Always A Marine by Steven Preece. It's the sequel to his first autobiography, "Amongst the Marines", which seemed to create a fair amount of controversey. Both books go well together and may have been better as one big book. Anyway: this book is about moving on from a violent lifestyle in the military and is packed with adventure, conflict and emotion. The Brit military system is the very best in the world at breaking recruits down and building them up to fighting machines. Yet, after they leave there is no training to undo this and consequently the transition into civvy-street can be very challenging for some. Having read and related to the first book, this book really closes out the story, and can be read without needing to know what happens in the first one. What I enjoyed the most is Preece's unpredictability and a constant wonder of what would happen next as I flicked through the pages with interest. May be, they should issue this book to soldiers when they leave the military. It is possible it would help them understand the type of mindset they may be demobbing with!!!

Also: The ninja stuff is riveting and interesting in how it helped the author to step far beyond the aggression he learnt as a serviceman.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Aug 2010 10:30:48 BDT
Kenneth Grahame: An Innocent in the Wild Wood by Alison Prince
Rupert Brooke: Life, Death and Myth by Nigel Jones
Beau Brummell by Ian Kelly

Posted on 23 Aug 2010 13:48:28 BDT
bspeak says:
Speak Swahili, Dammit !
Recently finished reading 'Speak Swahili, Dammit!' James Penhaligon's biography of his childhood in a remote gold-mining community in Tanganyika. A fascinating, entertaining and a gripping read.

Posted on 23 Aug 2010 20:56:36 BDT
jenna says:
Depends what type of biography your are looking for. "Wake Up, Mummy" by Anna Lowe is available for pre-order from Amazon. I think this might be a good one for 2011.

Posted on 23 Aug 2010 20:57:26 BDT
jenna says:
Depends what type of biography your are looking for. "Wake Up, Mummy" by Anna Lowe is available for pre-order from Amazon. I think this might be a good one for 2011.
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