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Best Biography?


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Showing 176-200 of 455 posts in this discussion
Posted on 22 Feb 2010 11:18:53 GMT
No Easy Road (Paperback) by Patsy Whyte - the story of a traveller girl brought up in care. It's got everything, excitement, mystery, inspiration. A fantastic read.

Posted on 24 Feb 2010 08:58:02 GMT
Last edited by the author on 25 Feb 2010 23:03:28 GMT
JONESY says:
"Memoir" by John McGahern. This is a brilliant account of Mr McGahern's upbringing in rural Ireland. He was a truly great writer and teacher. (He was my Primary School teacher back in the late 60's).

Posted on 25 Feb 2010 21:31:41 GMT
R. Chai says:
I loved Thirty Four by William Hastings Burke - really because its not a traditional biography. He pretty much grabs his reader and takes them all over the world trying to find out all the secrets of Albert Goering. Albert was Hermann Goring's younger brother; he was a fierce opponent of the Third Reich and spent much of the war saving Jews and political dissidents. Throw in four wives and a string of love affairs and you can see why Albert's story is such a page turner. I'd love to see more books like this - that read like something other than a boring bio. Thirty Four

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Feb 2010 17:28:33 GMT
Phil says:
I love Gordon Bowker's biography of Malcolm Lowry Pursued by Furies: A Life of Malcolm Lowry and the two volumes by Brian Boyd on Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian Years: The Russian Years v. 1 and Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years (Princeton Paperbacks), which are magnificent. I greatly enjoyed John Carey's William Golding: The Man Who Wrote Lord of the Flies too and found it very difficult to put it down.
Philip
History of Us

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Mar 2010 17:51:06 GMT
connie cymru says:
If you would like to learn a little about Aspergers in simplistic terms, do read the book Curious incident of the dog in the night time by Mark Haddon.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Mar 2010 17:52:05 GMT
connie cymru says:
If you would like to learn a little about Aspergers in simplistic terms, do read the book Curious incident of the dog in the night time by Mark Haddon.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Mar 2010 20:34:15 GMT
DN PERKS says:
Claire Tomalin on Pepys is fab
Like a Fiery Elephant by Jonathan Coe about the writer BS Johnson is great
but my favourite is
Miranda Carters book about Anthony Blunt the spy

Posted on 15 Mar 2010 16:03:05 GMT
susan wright says:
keith allens autobiography is excellent funny revealing and quite sombre in places.

Posted on 18 Mar 2010 11:49:46 GMT
Marc H. Stevens says:
Am I allowed a bit of shameless self-promotion? If so, I can heartily recommend my own new book:

'Escape, Evasion and Revenge: The True Story of a German-Jewish RAF Pilot Who Bombed Berlin and Became a PoW'.

It is the biography of my late father, the only German Jew known to have flown bombers in the RAF, bomb his own country (and hometown), get shot down and become one of the most ardent escapers of the war. During this period, he was the object of a Metropolitan Police manhunt (as an enemy alien on the loose in England), and was without protection from the Geneva Convention. Had the Nazis ever discovered his true identity, he would have been tortured and executed as a traitor.

But don't just take my word for it, there are 3 very nice reviews on Amazon.co.uk.

Thanks,

Marc

Escape, Evasion and Revenge: The True Story of a German-Jewish RAF Pilot Who Bombed Berlin and Became a PoW

Posted on 21 Mar 2010 01:11:53 GMT
Gypsy Boy: One Boy's Struggle to Escape from a Secret World
without a doubt, GYPSY BOY BY MIKEY WALSH....
the absolute best one i have read in a long time, and i mean years...
incredible, hilarious, heartbreaking, beautiful and, number one sunday times best seller this week.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 May 2010 00:03:57 BDT
MHM says:
you might enjoy new bio on Patrick Shaw Stewart by Miles Jebb; the WW1 contrasts of pre-war life with the realities of war.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 May 2010 03:28:35 BDT
Jean Walker says:
Best I've read in last couple of years are by newish biographer Kate Williams: England's Mistress (Emma Hamilton) and Becoming Queen (Victoria). Both are unputdownable.

Posted on 29 May 2010 10:44:45 BDT
hiljean says:
Without a doubt all the biographies I've read by Mary Lovell have been superb - she's a good storyteller as well as a fine biographer:

The Mitford Sisters
A Scandalous Life (Jane Digby)
Bess of Hardwick

My all-time favourite has to be the first volume of Clive James's autobiography: Unreliable Memoirs which is really laugh-out-loud funny.

Meredith Daneman's biography of Margot Fonteyn is exellent.
Also loved Secrets of the Flesh (a biography of Colette) by Judith Thurman.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 May 2010 08:41:56 BDT
Jean Walker says:
I've read The Mitford Sisters and A Scandalous Life and loved them. I must try to find Bess Of Hardwick. I love the 20s and 30s period and have read a lot of biographies of the Bloomsbury group and others from that era. Just finished "Uncommon Arrangements" - accounts of seven literary marriages in London in the 20s and 30s.

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Jun 2010 15:31:59 BDT
TOMIKO says:
ROONEY'S GOLD - it was really really funny, a great suprise read. It was so well written that I really enjoyed it and im not even that interested in football or wayne rooney.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Jun 2010 11:54:37 BDT
Last edited by the author on 2 Jun 2010 21:28:50 BDT
without doubt the best I have read in ages is True Compass the autobiography of Edward Kennedy.written with true warmth and humility.Here we get the truth.The media hasn't always told the truth about this man and far from being the 'black sheep' in comparison to his iconic brothers he comes across as warm and human ;a champion of the under dog.well written and I found compulsive reading.

Posted on 3 Jun 2010 05:57:16 BDT
JayBeeBee says:
Sir Ranalph Fiennes " Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know" just about sums up this incredible adventurer.

Posted on 4 Jun 2010 19:09:00 BDT
Last edited by the author on 4 Jun 2010 19:14:33 BDT
H. Jasper says:
I have just finished Clara Bow, Runnin' Wild by David Stern, an amazingly well written true story of this remarkably gifted actress, brilliant I couldn't put it down.Clara Bow: Runnin' Wild

Posted on 4 Jun 2010 20:01:47 BDT
lose weight says:
A thousand Sorrows by Elizabeth Kim. A misery memoir but quite gripping.

Posted on 4 Jun 2010 20:12:37 BDT
lose weight says:
And what about Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt? Evocation of a poor Dublin childhood. 'Tis aint bad either. His brother wrote "A Monk Swimming" which aint bad either.

Posted on 6 Jun 2010 00:03:27 BDT
shell says:
best one i have read was Constance Brisco , abused by her mother but told with some humour , excellent read

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Jun 2010 21:29:06 BDT
Absolutely agree. I bought this book many years ago and it is one of the few books I can't give away.

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Jun 2010 14:17:25 BDT
g whizz says:
A very good autobiography is that of Eddy Jordan, but only if your into motor racing. It gives a fascinating insight into the wheeling and dealing of Eddy and others as they go about their racing business.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jun 2010 21:40:53 BDT
swimmerpaul says:
David Nivan The moons a balloon. Best Sporting Bio Tony Adams.

In reply to an earlier post on 14 Jun 2010 11:31:53 BDT
The Wright Brothers
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Initial post:  13 Jan 2009
Latest post:  25 days ago

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