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Bio on Benny Hill shows he was considered funnier than Monty Python by various TV stations


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In reply to an earlier post on 25 Apr 2013 22:29:24 BDT
Last edited by the author on 26 Apr 2013 12:24:56 BDT
gille liath says:
There's no comparison between MP and the Fast Show. FS was totally reliant on catchphrases, MP hardly at all. It only gives that impression because it was so influential that people quote it all the time; if that's your memory of the show, you really need to see it again. Besides, FS is already the best part of 20 years ago - hardly that modern.

In fact the only one of your comparisons that I would say stands up is Garnett/Rab C.

And Toksvig 'unkillable'? Well, we can dream...

Posted on 28 Apr 2013 19:40:57 BDT
Last edited by the author on 28 Apr 2013 19:42:59 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 28 Apr 2013 19:45:54 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 14 May 2013 22:25:15 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 15 May 2013 12:07:58 BDT
Benny Hill-not funny and not breathing.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 May 2013 16:02:59 BDT
Dan Fante says:
It screams something anyway.

Posted on 29 May 2013 21:26:41 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 2 Jun 2013 21:24:40 BDT
Man of truth says:
"Hill street no blues" for the name of the Hill documentary they should make.

Posted on 7 Jun 2013 17:16:23 BDT
dregj says:
didn't like monty python show at all
for every brilliant sketch there'd be another 25 minutes of utter unfunny embarrassment.
that a pretty low hit rate for any comedy.
The films are completely different however
pure genius
especially meaning of life
reminds me of the family guy bit where they torture meg by making her watch the 30 hours of python sketches that didn't work

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Jun 2013 19:56:35 BDT
Last edited by the author on 7 Jun 2013 19:57:53 BDT
gille liath says:
Except...if that was actually true, the Family Guy audience would never have heard of it. To use a 40 year old show as an example of 'utter unfunny embarrassment' - hmm, something not quite right there...

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Jun 2013 18:23:50 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
Cleese himself said that a lot of Monty Python was dross, but that was a necessary process for the team in getting to the gold nuggets that made the show memorable. By contrast, Hill probably never plumbed the depths in the way the MP team did - but then he never reached the heights of Cleese & Co. at their best.

Posted on 12 Jun 2013 20:23:36 BDT
d says:
Bob Hope was born in Eltham, London.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jun 2013 20:25:49 BDT
d says:
Bob Hope was born in Eltham, London - he went back several times to visit relations, usually when he was playin the London Palladium.

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jun 2013 21:08:32 BDT
gille liath says:
He never came across as anything but a Yank though, did he? I think he must've been brought up there.

Posted on 22 Jun 2013 14:24:00 BDT
Fred Bloggs says:
I think the best comedian from that generation was without a doubt the brilliant Dave Allen, who was both cerebral and laugh out funny. While I do doff my tifler to the Python gang, I did get irritated by a certain air of middle-class Oxbridge 'smugness' they exuded. Perhaps it was something to do with me having to listen to 'oh aren't we clever, because we get it and you don't' grammar schoolboys reciting verbatim the Parrot Sketch and that one featuring shrill cockney women sitting in a laundrette talking about Jean Paul Sarte.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2013 12:53:01 BDT
gille liath says:
Yeah: that's a valid criticism of Python. I think their intellectual interests - languages, philosophy, history - added another dimension to their comedy; in the same way, they were the first TV comedians to use a variety of regional accents impartially (ie without stereotyping), and the first to shoot at locations around the country. Still, at times, they were overly concerned to prove how clever they are. You have to wonder how deep their knowledge really went, when they couldn't pronounce words like Proust and Njorl (which should be Njal anyway).

Btw wot's a tifler? ;)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jun 2013 14:05:29 BDT
Annie W says:
What about Dick Emery? Was once given tickets to go to a recording of one of his TV shows, and, while the script may have been funny, when the cameras weren't rolling Mr Emery was a nasty, bad-tempered man, who was vitriolic towards cast, crew, and audience. The funniest bit was the poor man tasked to dash out from the side at appropriate times, with instruction boards instructing the audience to 'laugh', applaud', and just 'louder'.

Posted on 24 Jun 2013 21:40:42 BDT
Man of truth says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 25 Jun 2013 13:10:08 BDT
I was on holiday in Wales at a time when TV reception was just awful. We didn't bother trying to watch because it was all snow. Then we heard that one pub had great reception, and we also heard that Benny Hill was on. We went to the pub and could hardly get in. It was packed and there was also a crowd outside. All there for Benny Hill. I wonder if that would have happened for a Python show?

Benny Hill was a colossal star in his own way whereas Python, who I love, seem to have a less widespread appeal. Benny Hill could never have matched Life of Brian, and Python could never match Hill at his best. Which means that we all benefit from these two giants.

Posted on 27 Jun 2013 11:47:45 BDT
I. Young says:
Has Benny Hill stood the test of time? Much of his humour in the 70s and 80s was deriviative of his own 20+ year old material. Some good gags in his shows but has not had the influence of the Pythons and neither is their still a large audience for Hill's shows.
Yes Englebert Humbledick sold more records than David Bowie in 1968. But so what.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Jul 2013 18:03:24 BDT
Last edited by the author on 2 Jul 2013 18:24:26 BDT
scarecrow says:
I'm from over the Pond, Chicago, We watched Benny after he had sadly passed, the Nineties he was popular;We came to love him, his big broad brimstone fire-place face,always the bumbler, the failed subject, much like our own Jackie Gleason from much earlier the 1950s. . .
Benny found a means to make the dynamic edit of TV work for him,He didn't need to be live,. . .No one does, save for these vacuous American reality and star-finding nonsense. . .
Benny found the fast-speeded cartoonist clips, with a scattered "Fur Elise" ; Ludwig would have approved, this music was also dedicated to the female gaze as Benny's staff, their affinity to make $$ flow their way. . .
Yes we have no disagreement with well-shaped'' juicy'' females running round half-naked, often police officers,nurses,young damsels cuing at a bus stop. . . only to loose their sweater to a hook Benny had forgotten while walking. . . for Benny's sketches' these moments were always an electrical means to keep-get it up, off the ground; the shot flowing for those with us(many American men)with testosterone Freudian gaps to resolve, to mount;
He kept getting poked in the derriere by a forgotten umbrella. . .the sum of anyone's life really. . .
Yes he was remiss in his LIVE,and often simply followed a poetic narrative in the Bum-Hobo Clown-face episodes he did solo. Those were touching, a lost love, a glance at a'' femme fatale'' he could never had, nor even speak with. We've all been there . . . He concocted live with edits; and that made the stage compelling.

His "bloopers",bumbling news anchors,(lost spectacles) was a delight. , ,to paraphrase,
("It couldn't be told if the laboratory was. . ." (No get it right)(Offstage voice), "It couldn't be told if they were Labour or Tory was. . .". . .
Also his advertisements where some prop goes wrong comes unglued ,very much was a per-cursor to our own, or
or the white picket gate that never opens during a musical number. or the wig that falls. . .

He warmed his hands round Diana Darby. .as any healthy man. . She kept us warm from a great distance. . .
And feminists here took issue with the latter "female" street numbers, where he had that enormous red-Afro wig, hilarious . . . .
Benny had great instincts for place, very spontaneous for cumbersome situations, where as he arrives there is no more structures to place his bike; so he merely places the front wheel in the crack of the statues derriere.

Posted on 15 Jul 2013 17:10:02 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 3 Aug 2013 21:35:48 BDT
Last edited by the author on 3 Aug 2013 21:40:26 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 7 Aug 2013 14:51:04 BDT
Man of truth says:
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Posted on 9 Aug 2013 16:37:01 BDT
Man of truth says:
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