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Are there any people out there writing biographies of obscure people?


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Showing 101-125 of 319 posts in this discussion
Posted on 11 Apr 2012 11:52:29 BDT
He's not obscure (he was once one of the most famous people in America), but largely forgotten is Edward Payson Weston: The World's Greatest Walker. His story is almost like a Victorian-era Forrest Gump and he met everybody from Abraham Lincoln to PT Barnum as well as spending several years touring Britain. I've just edited his biography, co-authored by the Mail on Sunday's Nick Harris, and while I'm biased it's definitely worth a look Man in a Hurry, A

Posted on 20 Apr 2012 19:13:56 BDT
laila says:
[[ASIN:1456784064 Tapestry of Tears]

True story. see Synopsis and review from a reader.RD PAYNE

Posted on 22 Apr 2012 17:24:41 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 29 Apr 2012 14:46:40 BDT]

Posted on 22 Apr 2012 21:06:14 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 23 Apr 2012 02:42:12 BDT]

Posted on 25 Apr 2012 01:08:02 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 28 Apr 2012 19:42:27 BDT]

Posted on 25 Apr 2012 01:08:25 BDT
Poked and Prodded- A Humorous Medical Memoir

Memoir Description:
This is a story about a man. A man who felt he had developed a potentially life-threatening sickness, only to be told "you're fine". This is a story about this man's struggle to deal with and overcome this all-too-common medical drama.

So, sit back, relax. Gather your family round. Call up your pets. Invite your family physician to sit next to you as you journey into Poked and Prodded.

General Surgeon's Warning- Reading the following story may cause one or more of the following symptoms:

*Uncontrollable laughter
*Sudden sadness
*Loss of appetite
*Gain of appetite
*Pessimism
*Optimism
*Increased Heart Rate
*Decreased Tension
*Goosebumps
*Flatulence
*Vivid Dreams
*Sleep Paralysis
*Excessive Sweating

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 17:34:53 BDT
Professor H says:
Well in my case I am relying on newspaper reports, his own documents, and his trial for murder.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2012 22:37:48 BDT
Although it may be a bit parochial, but I wondered the same think when I was researching a book on Scottish industry. I found out that there were lots of people, famous in their day and all but forgotten. This resulted in my book 'Glasgow With a Flourish'. It contains pen-pictures of some Glaswegians who were famous nationally and internationally and I came across some of them accidentally by way of research. Included in this list is 'Crimea' Simpson, the first war correspondent who recorded the Charge of the Light Brigade. Also 'Paraffin' Young, a friend of David Livingston, and who was the very first oil tycoon. James R Napier was the inventor of the coffee machine. Maybe a bit parochial and not full biographies but some of them meet your criteria.

Posted on 4 May 2012 09:31:31 BDT
P. R. Scott says:
Well, this is probably shameless self promotion, but as an independant writer/publisher, I have no agent to do it for me, so the autobiographical 'Expletives Deleted' is now FREE on Kindle for the next 5 days. Thanks

Posted on 6 May 2012 13:23:02 BDT
Last edited by the author on 6 May 2012 13:26:02 BDT
chas author says:
hi Marcus, why don't you look at excerpts from my book entitled " Kirsty, a fathers fight for justice, it is certainly different and highlights the immoral attitude of those with power in this country and really shows how the justice system is non-existant. i think you would find it a good read and as it can be downloaded on Kindle not expensive.
good reading and thank you for giving me the opportunity to join this discussion.

Charles W Pearce.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 May 2012 17:23:50 BDT
Hi P.R. Scott, As a retired photo-journalist I should like to get my book in on this as Mr Scott says so well. I like him have no agent but I do have a publisher for my memoirs that is called '80 Years Gone in a Flash'. My book is also on Kindle at present and I can only ask you all to have a look at it

In reply to an earlier post on 8 May 2012 06:32:08 BDT
Professor H says:
'80 Years Gone in a Flash'......... great title.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 May 2012 06:38:32 BDT
Professor H says:
Well I found the free offer alluring. I must confess, but I am disappointed at both the bad typesetting and the lack of proofreading. You're a good writer, though.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 May 2012 06:41:39 BDT
Professor H says:
P.S. for example, "Gym Teacher" and "Headmaster": no capitalisation required.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 May 2012 09:16:43 BDT
Thanks for your reply and your thoughts on the title of my memoirs. As far as the type setting goes I would perhaps agree with you but that is my publishers problem. I have been through the first two chapters of the book and cannot find the two examples you give, but then I could have missed them.
Anyhow, many thanks for your thoughts on my writing.

Posted on 8 May 2012 09:18:45 BDT
80 Years Gone In A Flash - The Memoirs of a Photojournalist

Posted on 10 May 2012 06:58:05 BDT
Omar says:
How about some stories growing up in a new culture? Coming To Astoria (available for free download today (5/10)

Posted on 10 May 2012 12:49:30 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 14 May 2012 16:37:23 BDT]

Posted on 28 May 2012 16:23:19 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 28 May 2012 16:26:01 BDT]

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Jul 2012 11:16:11 BDT
Becca says:
I recently read Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parents Story by Dani Valdis which could be considered obscure as well as truly inspiring, it certaily was to me. Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parent's StoryCherry Blossom Children: One Foster Parent's Story

Posted on 28 Jul 2012 15:37:10 BDT
M. Slevin says:
My book about my mother's Alzheimer's has just been published, there is a piece about it in the Daily Mail on line today, under the "Femail" articles tab. If you're interested in that sort of thing.

Posted on 28 Jul 2012 20:57:32 BDT
JimC says:
Obscure? hmm... Well my biography is about Will Crooks MP. He's obscure in the fact that he's a bit of a forgotten character nowadays, which is very surprising when you think about his contributions to the British way of life, especially Londoners. His life story is quite remarkable too. As a young boy in London's East End he was sent to the Poplar Workhouse when his family was plunged into poverty, but he rose against this impoverished start in life to become a pioneer of the Labour movement. He was a hugely popular figure a hundred years ago, but you don't hear much mention of his name now when you hear about the early days of the Labour movement in the UK. I'm trying to put that right. All of us in the UK owe Will Crooks a huge dept of gratitude for his work in securing our old age pensions. He was also largely responsible making unemployment the state's responsibility. As part of the London County Council, Crooks was responsible for giving Londoners the Rotherhithe tunnel, The Greenwich foot tunnel and the Woolwich foot tunnel under the Thames. As part of the LCC he also dealt a killer blow against one of the darker sides of Victorian Britain; Baby Farming. He even became chairman of the Poplar Guardians, the very board that years earlier had been responsible for him being sent to the workhouse, an experience that he describes as being etched into his soul. He then set about reforming and humanizing the whole workhouse system. He was only the fourth ever Labour MP, the first ever Labour Mayor in London and even went on to become a Privy Councillor to King George V, a remarkable feat for a poor kid from the East End of London in the class dominated years of the early 20th century. It's hard to believe that not many people today recognize the name of Will Crooks MP. Where there's a Will, there's a way. The remarkable life story of Will Crooks MP.

Posted on 29 Jul 2012 05:04:24 BDT
Professor H says:
I'm jealous, Jim. He's a far more worthy character than my george Chapman. Best of luck.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Aug 2012 14:57:36 BDT
M. Samwell says:
I'm working on a biography of David Samwell: the assistant surgeon initially and then surgeon on Captain Cook's voyages...and witness to Cook's death.Also a poet and a renaissance man and bit of a womaniser etc etc... In researching it, I have realised that there is not one really good biography of Captain Cook himself. Lots of biogs but turgid in the extreme....

Posted on 16 Aug 2012 14:15:11 BDT
R. Marshall says:
M. Samwell

I'm currently reading 'Mrs Cook: The Real and Imagined life of the Captain's Wife', by Marele Day. It's a fictionalised account of the lives of James Cook and his wife Elizabeth. It's an enjoyable read as fiction, but it's clearly based on lots of proper research, and it might make a change from the turgid biographies you're reading!
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Initial post:  25 Dec 2009
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