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Posted on 18 Mar 2010 11:45:08 GMT
Am I allowed a bit of shameless self-promotion? If so, I can heartily recommend my own new book:

'Escape, Evasion and Revenge: The True Story of a German-Jewish RAF Pilot Who Bombed Berlin and Became a PoW'.

It is the biography of my late father, the only German Jew known to have flown bombers in the RAF, bomb his own country (and hometown), get shot down and become one of the most ardent escapers of the war. During this period, he was the object of a Metropolitan Police manhunt (as an enemy alien on the loose in England), and was without protection from the Geneva Convention. Had the Nazis ever discovered his true identity, he would have been tortured and executed as a traitor.

But don't just take my word for it, there are 3 very nice reviews on Amazon.co.uk.

Thanks,

Marc

Escape, Evasion and Revenge: The True Story of a German-Jewish RAF Pilot Who Bombed Berlin and Became a PoW

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Mar 2010 09:54:54 GMT
Travels of the Mind I am Ettore Grillo. My book is very useful against anxiety and depression. It have helped many people.

Posted on 21 Mar 2010 01:12:35 GMT
Gypsy Boy: One Boy's Struggle to Escape from a Secret World
without a doubt, GYPSY BOY BY MIKEY WALSH....
the absolute best one i have read in a long time, and i mean years...
incredible, hilarious, heartbreaking, beautiful and, number one sunday times best seller this week.

Posted on 28 Feb 2011 09:03:50 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 18 Sep 2012 21:32:24 BDT]

Posted on 1 Mar 2011 13:52:22 GMT
Hey, please may I point you in the direction of my debut book: How To Say Boo To A Goose. I would give it the big sell but I'd rather you downloaded the chapters and made your own mind up. Thanks!

Posted on 2 Mar 2011 00:11:47 GMT
Angel Just-Rights
Laugh, shout, cry and sigh with big twists at the end!

Posted on 2 Mar 2011 00:11:49 GMT
Angel Just-Rights
Laugh, shout, cry and sigh with big twists at the end!

Posted on 13 Apr 2011 13:41:58 BDT
Last edited by the author on 4 May 2011 17:58:10 BDT
1923: A Memoir 84p on Kindle
1923 in Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #49 in Kindle Store > Kindle > Biography > Historical #74 in Kindle Store > Kindle > Biography > Memoirs
4.9 out of 5 stars See all reviews (8 customer reviews
Review
It's a personal as well as a social history. Smith has the knack of bringing the times to life in a way that few writers can manage. It's the ability to tell a story, the knowledge of when to move on & not labour a point.
--The Bookbag

1923 is a book that succeeds in two ways with ease, both as a personal memoir of a life lived in a volatile age and as a record of that age for all time. --The Current Reader

"1923" is uplifting and highly recommended. --Midwest Book Review

1923: A Memoir is a protest against social injustice, corruption, war, famine, poverty, and societies blinded by greed. More importantly, it is the story of hope and the notion that anything can be overcome if desired. --The Publishing Guru
Product Description
To say that Harry Smith was born under an unlucky star would be an understatement. Born in England in 1923, Smith chronicles the tragic story of his early life in this first volume of his memoirs. He presents his family's early history-their misfortunes and their experiences of enduring betrayal, inhumane poverty, infidelity, and abandonment.

1923: A Memoir presents the story of a life lyrically described, capturing a time both before and during World War II when personal survival was dependent upon luck and guile. During this time, failure insured either a trip to the workhouse or burial in a common grave. Brutally honest, Smith's story plummets to the depths of tragedy and flies up to the summit of mirth and wonder, portraying real people in an uncompromising, unflinching voice.

1923: A Memoir tells of a time and place when life, full of raw emotion, was never so real.

Selection From Chapter Nine "The Phony War"
Selection From Chapter Nine "The Phony War"
"The platform was deserted while I waited for my train to take me to Padgate for induction. It was cold and damp, and grey. Sweet smoke from the McIntosh candy plant fell like drizzle across the station. I reached into my overcoat and found a near empty packet of cigarettes. I placed one into my mouth. I struck a match furiously and began to inhale the harsh tobacco. In the distance, I could hear the whistle of the train. I could smell the coal burning off its engine. I could smell the coal which had been dug from the pits of Barnsley, Elsecar and Barley Hole. I could taste it in my mouth around my teeth and on my tongue. It was the soot of my father and my grandfather and all my ancestors who laboured beneath the ground. As the train drew its way into the belly of the station, another passenger approached the platform. He was a man in his fifties, long past the time for war and he was whistling the tune "run rabbit run rabbit run, run, run....."

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Apr 2011 21:25:05 BDT
monica says:
Finding that chatrooms devoted to book recommendations have been infected by advertising would have given me reason to die now but for my love of Spotty the ever-loveable Dalmatian who once rescued me . Finding that there is is such a thing as a 'Tragic Life-Stories' section in a book-shop has done away with all hope. Spotty, tragic childhood that he had and all, is going down with me over that cliff.

Posted on 1 Jun 2011 12:41:51 BDT
K. Taylor says:
Try my book, at the book launch of [Tied with an Easy Thread ISBN 978-0755213283] people were incredibly moved by my readings about the early life of my mother. They all wanted to know more...

Posted on 1 Jun 2011 15:28:52 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 2 Jun 2011 11:22:12 BDT]

Posted on 8 Nov 2011 21:41:49 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 19 Nov 2011 00:34:34 GMT]

Posted on 9 Nov 2011 09:11:02 GMT
Jo Carroll says:
Can I plug my own book here?

I gave up house/job/car to go round the world on my own. Not something many middle-aged women do. And yes, there were adventures, and scary bits, and a huge drama that finally . . .

Only on kindle at the moment, but the book will be here soon:
Over the Hill and Far Away: One Grown-up Gap Year

In reply to an earlier post on 9 Nov 2011 23:15:01 GMT
www.thequietaustralians.com

Posted on 10 Nov 2011 02:42:28 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 19 Nov 2011 00:33:41 GMT]

Posted on 11 Nov 2011 21:30:53 GMT
[Deleted by Amazon on 19 Nov 2011 00:28:22 GMT]

Posted on 12 Nov 2011 15:54:21 GMT
[[ASIN B005NJB29Q 'Blanche Parry & Queen Elizabeth I' Souvenir Calendar (Parish Commemoration of the Her Majesty The Queen's Diamond Jubilee 2012)]] This is a good way to get into biographies as it is superb pictures each with a description - so making it a book too - all in a calendar format. Then if you want to know more read [[ASIN:B0010B4 'Mistress Blanche Queen Elizabeth I's Confidante']]
See also: www.blancheparry.com Hope you enjoy the reads.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Nov 2011 20:25:10 GMT
debs65 says:
little girl lost

ingrid steel

Posted on 20 Nov 2011 02:36:25 GMT
Bob Lee says:
This is just out. I didn't want a heavy biography about 1 person, this book contrasts the lives of 7 different athletes which I found much more diverse & interesting
Greatest Sportsmen of the Modern Era

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Nov 2011 09:10:04 GMT
M. Allani says:
Couldn't agree with you more - wholesale misery as it were! - There's a misuse of the word tragedy too which is about the cathartic effect of seeing GREATNESS undone then enlightened/redeemed.

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Nov 2011 09:16:58 GMT
M. Allani says:
Sounds very sweet!

Posted on 23 Nov 2011 12:45:30 GMT
Jean Bigou says:
Out tomorrow - sounds as though it will be a very good read -

Outsider: Always Almost: Never Quite

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2011 18:20:51 GMT
Sarria says:
"misery lit" in the trade :o)
but some are inspiring and not sickening.
I dislike "click lit" the way others hate "misery lit" and sci fi lit set so far in somone imagination is just too surreal.

I guess what makes us different makes us special :o) WOuldnt do a world where we all like the same.

In reply to an earlier post on 24 Nov 2011 23:54:27 GMT
M. Allani says:
Well done for doing it! - Hope you had a great great time.

Posted on 25 Nov 2011 16:55:53 GMT
Hamburg 1947: A Place for the Heart to Kip 1.20

Twenty-two years old and ready for peace, Harry Leslie Smith has survived the Great Depression and endured the Second World War. Now, in 1945 in Hamburg, Germany, he must come to terms with a nation physically and emotionally devastated. In this memoir, he narrates a story of people searching to belong and survive in a world that was almost destroyed.
Hamburg 1947 recounts Smith's youthful RAF days as part of the occupational forces in post-war Germany. A wireless operator during the war, he doesn't want to return to Britain and join a queue of unemployed former servicemen; he reenlists for long term duty in occupied Germany. From his billet in Hamburg, a city razed to the ground by remorseless aerial bombardment, he witnesses a people and era on the brink of annihilation. This narrative presents a street-level view of a city reduced to rubble populated with refugees, black marketers, and cynical soldiers.
At times grim and other times amusing, Smith writes a memoir relaying the social history about this time and place, providing a unique look at post-WWII Germany. Hamburg 1947 is both a love story for a city and a passionate retailing of a love affair with a young German woman
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