Customer Discussions > biography discussion forum

A Great War Biography - The D-Day Dodger


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-15 of 15 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 28 Sep 2009 23:50:00 BDT
Last edited by the author on 28 Sep 2009 23:51:36 BDT
Alberts Book The D-Day Dodger
My new book with 145 WW2 veterans including a snippet from Albert - The Unknown Warriors

Albert Darlington brought out a book a couple of years ago called 'The D Day Dodger' he was only 17 when he joined the Army during WW2. It wasn't long before he was on the front line in Italy. It's a great read. Very sad in parts, but most amusing in others. He was part of the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. It's wrote from the perspective of an ordinary infantryman that was in the thick of it.!! I much prefer personal memoirs of war than stuffy tomes wrote by military historians.

Alan Whickers book about his time in Italy during the war is also a great read. He was in the Army Film and Photo Unit. Anyone got any good suggestions. I'm particularly keen to read a biography of someone who spent time in the Far East POW camps.
Your reply to theunknownwarriors.co.uk's post:
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
 

Posted on 29 Sep 2009 06:54:33 BDT
1st world war

Her Privates we - Frank Manning
With a Machine Gun to Cambrai - George Coppard
Storm of Steel - Ernst Junger
Private 12768 - John Jackson
Old Soldiers Never Die - Frank Richards
To the Last Ridge - W H Downing

2nd World War

The Forgotten Soldier - Guy Sajer
If You Survive - George Wilson

Posted on 29 Sep 2009 22:39:41 BDT
The Forgotten Soldier sounds interesting. I've never read a WW2 war book from a Germans perspective.

Posted on 29 Sep 2009 22:41:15 BDT
Thanks for the suggestions. Anyone got any good recommendations for Far East POW books?

Posted on 30 Sep 2009 12:02:42 BDT
"A Doctor's War" by Aiden MacCarthy, he was a RAF doctor captured in Indonesia, a facinating read. I read about it in a book by the late Pete MacCarthy. This book as far as I know has had a reprint. It's written in a very simple self-effacing style and only after this man had worked for many years as a GP, he resisted writing and only under pressure from relatives did he do so.

Posted on 7 Oct 2009 22:50:36 BDT
Gatecrasher says:
The Railwayman by Eric Lomax. Far east pow story 5 Star rated.

Posted on 8 Oct 2009 03:20:49 BDT
S Wood says:
Naples '44: An Intelligence Officer in the Italian Labyrinth - 1st class biography of someone who can write exceptionally well and was in British Military Inteligence in North Africa and Naples (thus the title of the book). Promise you wont have read anything like it.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Nov 2009 20:40:31 GMT
Ms. C. Ryan says:
one of the best books ive read about POWs in the Far East was a little paperback called Surviving The Sword .I thought the book covered aeras that I had not come across in many others i.e How many Officers left the men to look after themselves and the horrors of the journey to Japan on the Troopships .

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Nov 2009 20:40:33 GMT
Ms. C. Ryan says:
one of the best books ive read about POWs in the Far East was a little paperback called Surviving The Sword .I thought the book covered aeras that I had not come across in many others i.e How many Officers left the men to look after themselves and the horrors of the journey to Japan on the Troopships .

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Feb 2010 05:45:10 GMT
M. Scott says:
I would highly recommend King Rat written by James Clavell about a group of men in a Japanese POW camp. An absolute classic.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Feb 2010 05:45:15 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 11 Feb 2010 05:45:47 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Feb 2010 11:35:52 GMT
A personal memoir you might also enjoy: Boys at War by Russell Margerison, the story of an 'ordinary' airman in World War Two who was shot down over Belgium, sheltered by the resistance, taken prisoner and eventually 'liberated' by the Russians. A book with lots of colour and humour, entirely lacking in pomposity, and a great read. Boys at War

Posted on 27 Nov 2010 09:50:22 GMT
Pat says:
Another one lacking pomposity is Dropped In It by Colin Hall. He was a private in the parachute regiment and got caught up in Operation Market Garden. I like the book because the author is so down to earth and takes everything in his stride - prisoner-of-war/being shot/seeing scores of his mates killed. He doesn't glorify anything but tells it like it is.

Dropped In It - the autobiography of a Cotswold Boy and Arnhem Veteran

Posted on 30 Nov 2010 14:02:41 GMT
Last edited by the author on 30 Nov 2010 14:10:24 GMT
Surviving The Sword is an excellent, if harrowing, read. It is a collection of stories covering many areas of the Far East conflict.

The Railwayman by Eric Lomax is a compelling story of survival against the odds.

This autobiography Prisoner Without A Crime by Jack Jennings has just been published. I know the Author - a remarkable man, still going strong at 91.

Posted on 20 May 2011 21:33:22 BDT
1923: A Memoir 83p

Review
It's a personal as well as a social history. Smith has the knack of bringing the times to life in a way that few writers can manage. It's the ability to tell a story, the knowledge of when to move on & not labour a point.
--The Bookbag

1923 is a book that succeeds in two ways with ease, both as a personal memoir of a life lived in a volatile age and as a record of that age for all time. --The Current Reader

"1923" is uplifting and highly recommended. --Midwest Book Review

1923: A Memoir is a protest against social injustice, corruption, war, famine, poverty, and societies blinded by greed. More importantly, it is the story of hope and the notion that anything can be overcome if desired. --The Publishing Guru
Product Description
To say that Harry Smith was born under an unlucky star would be an understatement. Born in England in 1923, Smith chronicles the tragic story of his early life in this first volume of his memoirs. He presents his family's early history-their misfortunes and their experiences of enduring betrayal, inhumane poverty, infidelity, and abandonment.

1923: A Memoir presents the story of a life lyrically described, capturing a time both before and during World War II when personal survival was dependent upon luck and guile. During this time, failure insured either a trip to the workhouse or burial in a common grave. Brutally honest, Smith's story plummets to the depths of tragedy and flies up to the summit of mirth and wonder, portraying real people in an uncompromising, unflinching voice.

1923: A Memoir tells of a time and place when life, full of raw emotion, was never so real.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the biography discussion forum (211 discussions)

Discussion Replies Latest Post
Announcement
Important Announcement from Amazon
44 21 Jan 2014
Biographies on gay Alan Turing show he had parental neglect as a kid (mygenes.co.nz) 19 19 hours ago
the rose coloured wish by florence bone 24 1 day ago
HELP! Recommendations for history novels authors please 42 6 days ago
I have forgotten the title of this book 72 8 days ago
Best Biography? 461 29 Jan 2015
A desperate young man, ex coal miner, grabs an opportunity and now mixes with film stars 2 21 Jan 2015
Where were you when this happened!! 1 11 Jan 2015
Ottolenghi, Persiana or Jamie? 2 6 Jan 2015
Laugh out loud books? 48 5 Jan 2015
Bio on Benny Hill shows he was considered funnier than Monty Python by various TV stations 336 24 Dec 2014
Recommendations needed - Historical non-fiction 5 20 Nov 2014
 

This discussion

Participants:  11
Total posts:  15
Initial post:  28 Sep 2009
Latest post:  20 May 2011

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions