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any suggestions for a new read


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Showing 276-300 of 444 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on 25 Apr 2012 21:48:18 BDT
Ed says:
'The Help'---great read! Couldn't put it down.

In reply to an earlier post on 30 Apr 2012 22:53:55 BDT
You could try my memoir just published on Amazon Crushed My NHS Summer

Posted on 9 May 2012 09:40:12 BDT
Last edited by the author on 10 May 2012 09:17:14 BDT
chas author says:
if you are looking for something different why don't you try my book which is called " Kirsty, a Fathers fight for justice".
the book is about the life and tragic death by medical negligence of my beautiful daughter Kirsty.
this will certainly bring a tear to your eye but more importantly will show how badly people in authority treat the public in cases such as mine.
this is a good read on Kindle and very cheap. Charles W Pearce.

Posted on 10 May 2012 07:02:08 BDT
Omar says:
Coming To Astoria This is my story, covering the time when we moved to the US from Jordan in 1968 till I finished high school at age 18. A little humor is mixed in to the story. (available for free download today (5/10))

In reply to an earlier post on 10 May 2012 08:52:35 BDT
Paperboy, by Tony Macauley - the only pacifist paperboy in West Belfast! Very funny, fantastic insights and very moving in places. A must-read for anyone who remembers the Irish Troubles and news reports from the Shankill Road. I loved this book - and admired the way the author's voice remains that of a young teenager with a Belfast accent!

Posted on 14 May 2012 11:23:24 BDT
I am reading 'The Magic of Reality' by Richard Dawkins at the moment. This book represents education with a capital E and it should be in every school library. it is a hardback book written in the clearest of English and beautifully illustrated. Dawkins's objective is to answer the question 'How do we know what is really true?'

Posted on 21 May 2012 00:01:42 BDT
Last edited by the author on 21 May 2012 22:46:55 BDT
It all depends what people want to read if you are wanting a real life story, an autobiography or biography might be something you want to try They are great as they are real, you cant get better than that. Hannah Maloney-pen name Marie Maloney

In reply to an earlier post on 21 May 2012 11:33:39 BDT
Marand says:
Hannah

Just a word of warning as you and a few others have mentioned your own books. Self-promotion is no longer permitted outside the Meet Our Authors forum (see the Amazon Important Announcement at the top of the thread list which has a link to the MOA forum). Amazon have been known to delete posts so you would be better off going over to the MOA forum.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 May 2012 12:25:31 BDT
chas author says:
thank you for that.

Charles.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 May 2012 22:44:25 BDT
Last edited by the author on 21 May 2012 22:44:41 BDT
Thank you Marand I didnt realise as others had done the same, Thank you for the info. Hannah

In reply to an earlier post on 22 May 2012 06:03:32 BDT
Last edited by the author on 22 May 2012 06:24:12 BDT
Yes - try some American authors - Chuck Klosterman - first book written in his 20s "Fargo Rock City" followed by about 4 other books by this author, another good read "Ethan Frome" by Edith Wharton - this was made into a movie - I have read it three times now.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 May 2012 23:27:39 BDT
Marand says:
Hi Hannah - I hope you didn't think I was picking on you. I saw some others had posted promos but there had been a bit of a lull so I only responded to the last post thinking others would also see the comment and would be fore-warned. I wouldn't want you to think that there was anything personal in it.

Regards

Posted on 25 May 2012 23:48:10 BDT
Last edited by the author on 26 May 2012 04:19:51 BDT
D.E. McCourt says:
The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls - eccentric parents create a crazy childhood in this memoir. It really is an unforgettable read.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 May 2012 03:29:14 BDT
Has nobody yet read 'The Quiet Australians Saints and Sinners'?...I wud like to know what our fellow critics think?

Posted on 26 May 2012 07:13:57 BDT
Sou'Wester says:
Paul: If you'd be participating in this discussion properly you'd have seen the reminder made just a day or so ago that self promotion is not permitted in these forums. If you wish to promote your book this should be confined to the dedicated "Meet Our Authors" forum.

Posted on 26 May 2012 08:55:53 BDT
I think Ian Ronayne

Posted on 28 May 2012 14:04:02 BDT
marjolaine says:
'The Banker who turned to Voodoo' The Banker Who Turned to Voodoo is amusing, poignant, compelling and informative (all adjectives taken from the Amazon readers' reviews). An ironic look at a young Englishman working in a British Bank in Brazil in the 1960s followed by him becoming interested in the local voodoo. A veritable page turner.

Posted on 28 May 2012 16:05:37 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 28 May 2012 16:07:14 BDT]

Posted on 28 May 2012 16:14:05 BDT
A new read? This is the first book to tackle this subject from the viewpoint of a complete novice. Try Asylum Bound by Stuart Townsend.Asylum Bound
"My God, has it come to this?"
Meet Grace, white-haired, with dementia, being admitted to the daunting asylum with an un-welcome introduction from the student nurse. Then Percy, the crystal radio buff, with depression. Here is Harry, the Japanese ex-POW, who's bath-time is a re-living of battles fought and Walter, with the dodgy and less than faithful, girl-friend. What about Tom, who is getting secret signs from both the Newscaster on the BBC as well as the landlady of the local pub, or Betty who won't fit in the coffin, and needs a bit of encouragement?
But also meet Stuart, the very novice student nurse fearfully working on nights, standing there being strangled, not knowing what to do, or trying to come to grips on his first day on the ward with shaving a corpse.
Learn about what goes on in the long asylum corridor & how to survive the laws of the asylum jungle. Stuart has to rely on information from the unlikeliest of sources, the Social Club hard drinkers.
Asylum Bound is a wild weird walk through the experiences of a student nurse as he enters the unknown world of the mental "asylum" of the 1970s. It is a bizarre world, a world of terrible extremes.
Within this odd place there are Hogarthian characters of varying chaotic hues, some aggressive, some sad, some disturbed and some institutionalised, both patients and staff. It is in this strange world that Stuart begins to understand the origins of psychiatry and its terrible treatments, including lobotomies, E.C.T., insulin shock and even aversion therapy for underwear snatchers. He has to learn about schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, new and frightening conditions that had new and frightening treatments and outcomes.
But he finds an asylum coming to the end of any usefulness it ever once had. The patients are leaving, the staff are changing, and, thank God, the abuses are declining. It is a different world from anything he has experienced before. It is a very new world. It is a life-changing revelation.
For Stuart, what started as a novelty, progressed to fascination and was to end in tragedy.
It was the start of a long psychiatric nursing career.
It is, sadly, all true.

Posted on 28 Jul 2012 11:35:19 BDT
Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parents Story by Dani Valdis, read reviews and preview my thoughts are there too! Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parent's Story

Posted on 28 Jul 2012 11:35:58 BDT
Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parents Story by Dani Valdis, read reviews and preview my thoughts are there too! Cherry Blossom Children - One Foster Parent's Story

Posted on 29 Jul 2012 03:30:17 BDT
Try LIFE ABOARD A WARTIME LIBERTY SHIP, published by Amberley.

Posted on 29 Jul 2012 05:11:40 BDT
D.E. McCourt says:
Try "Tom Crean: Unsung Hero" - an unassuming Irishman that was one of the key people of both the Shackleton and Scott expeditions. He very quietly performed his duties with a constant display of unusual courage.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Jul 2012 16:03:13 BDT
Helen Dunmore, Penelope Fitzgerald, Sophie Hannah, Philip Hensher to name but a few. Guardian Saturday has a very good review section including crime and genre as well as literary fiction. A librarian.ps new Ruth Rendell is also very good , her books are not just about murders but are full of psychological insight.

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Aug 2012 10:50:25 BDT
More life tales in 'Tales of the city' and 'Why do we quote?'. Cath
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