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Reading matter for my 11 year old daughter


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Initial post: 7 Apr 2010 12:04:28 BDT
My daughters reading level was excellent until recently and then she just stopped reading - I couldn't find anything she was interested in. Teachers at school have commented on how her reading in school is suffering. Has anyone any ideas? She's v girly, is 11 but secretly wants to be 22 and loves all the American drivel on TV (Hannah Montana etc blah de blah). I'm trying to introduce her to new authors in the hope that we'll happen upon something she likes. Jean Ure at the moment - Sharon Creech on the way. Any ideas would be gratefully received. Many thanks

Posted on 7 Apr 2010 12:19:20 BDT
C. Lanty says:
Try Erin Hunter. The series about bears called Seekers has had my 11year old rivetted.

Posted on 7 Apr 2010 16:09:27 BDT
Judy Blume! Perfect girl-drama. Or Louise Rennisson, very funny books.

Or even the Hannah Montana books themselves, they may be drivel but my old teacher said that reading the cereal box was better than reading nothing!

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Apr 2010 16:52:09 BDT
JennyD says:
Samantha- my cousin is terrible, she doesn't read at all despite being a fantastic speller. She has no interest in reading because she wants everyone to pay attention to her, she cant just be by herself and she finds reading boring. However, there was one book she really got into, 'Knife' by RJ Anderson. Having looked it up on Amazon, it seems to be quite well-received.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Apr 2010 16:54:03 BDT
JennyD says:
sass- whats what my nana used to say. That Hannah Montana makes my skin crawl, things were different when i was a kid. Whatever happened to Clarissa Explains it All and Sister sister? Those were positive female role models.

Posted on 7 Apr 2010 17:05:48 BDT
JennyD - are you sure she's your cousin? She sounds just like my daughter.
I've looked at Knife and think it's worth a try - so thanks for that. She reads in bed - the only time she feels she's not missing "the action".
As for role models - don't get me started.
You know you're getting older when all the characters on TV are v young and really quite irritating. :0)

Posted on 7 Apr 2010 20:58:20 BDT
JennyD says:
sam-tv is bad nowadays, the messages young girls are getting are truly horrible. Basically, be thin and everything will be okay. Nevermind your brain, getting a boyfriend is the most important thing. I don't know how Miley Cyrus (or whatever she's called) sleeps at night. I guess at least there are books out there that contain positive female role models. To be honest, i'm glad i'm not a parent. I don't know what i'd do. I guess if i had a girl i'd advise her to watch Xena.

Posted on 10 Apr 2010 20:40:35 BDT
February83 says:
Louise Rennisson writes illiterate drivel. Avoid. The Twilight series is trashy but fun, and passably written.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Apr 2010 11:07:42 BDT
Erin Frost says:
Samantha - my daughter is 11 too and LOVES Hannah Montana etc... although you prefer something else for her, what about a biography about people, music groups she is interested in.

Posted on 13 Apr 2010 20:56:07 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 13 Apr 2010 21:27:59 BDT]

Posted on 13 Apr 2010 21:25:30 BDT
S. EADINGTON says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 19:43:52 BDT
bookqueen says:
palo cohello the alchimist and the diary of ann frank were two of the first books i'd ever read and on occasion go back too there's also a little bit of wisdom in each

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Apr 2010 23:00:10 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
I would try Salinger

Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:02:16 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:06:48 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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In reply to an earlier post on 16 Apr 2010 23:14:52 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
anyone with a sense of humour

Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:15:40 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:18:04 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:19:05 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:19:49 BDT
uk_reviewer says:
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Posted on 16 Apr 2010 23:22:11 BDT
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Posted on 18 Apr 2010 21:02:40 BDT
V. Bowe says:
Recommendation is anything by Roald Dahl. You can never be to old to observe his brilliance in encouraging all children including adults to be "sparky".

Posted on 19 Apr 2010 16:36:36 BDT
Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret

DEFINITELY encourage her to read Judy Blume books, starting with 'Are you there God? it's me Margaret'. Although written a good few years back, the issues explored in her books are timeless told in a cringy but somehoe endearing way due to the fact that the subjects are things most girls will go through.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Apr 2010 21:00:29 BDT
light says:
meg cabot books especially the princess diaries are loved by young teens - pink girly covers, romance, ordinary girl finds out she is a princess (my reluctant 11 year old quite likes these)
Her older sister who loves reading also liked these:
If she likes magic and fantasy I would recommend Diana Wynne Jones
For a new take on old fairytales try Enna Burning or the Thousand days by Shannon Hale
the Sirens quartet by Julia Golding
Percy Jackson books by Rick Riordan
Would she like graphic novels - Nancy Drew has been redone in comic/manga book style
Cathy Cassidy also has a popular series for girls

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Apr 2010 07:25:48 BDT
L. Davies says:
LW says:

Hi Samantha,

I would recommend something new and different: tales of heroism and adventure where a girl about your daughter's age gets involved in the mythical world of the Djinn. Sea Djinn and Fire Djinn by Linda Davies are hugely enjoyed by girls and boys. I must confess here that I am the author! But here's an objective source for you - Teen Librarian -

`The description of sand, sea and surf made me long for the ocean...Sea Djinn hooked me!
Mixing mythic encounters into contemporary life is not a new concept but Linda Davies has created something special here, adding in human greed and intrigue as well as ecological awareness into a fast-paced adventure no part of the story feels forced or false. The characters are fleshed out through the book and even the (human) villains are more than two-dimensional caricatures that often populate YA books as foils for the heroes. The twists in the story are artfully done and I did not see them coming until they were happening. The sense of the fantastic is present throughout the book but magic never comes to dominate the story instead it is the humanity of the protagonists (mortal, animal and mystical) that shines through and leads the story. I loved it and am eagerly awaiting Fire Djinn.'

Happy reading,

Linda

Sea Djinn
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