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If you like biographies about ordinary people...


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Initial post: 2 Mar 2011 19:41:41 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 10 May 2011 18:55:01 BDT]

Posted on 3 Mar 2011 09:19:55 GMT
Midgie says:
you might like The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In the 1950's some of Henrietta's cancer and non-cancer cells were taken for medical research without her consent. Known as HeLa cells, they have been used ever since for medical research and funded a multimillion dollar industry. There are no more of her cells in the world today than ever were in her body when she was alive. She was poor, black and neither she nor any of her family knew nor had given consent. So it is racism, medical research, medical ethics etc. It is a phenomenal book and anyone I know who as read it have raved about it.

Posted on 3 Mar 2011 19:24:51 GMT
Last edited by the author on 30 Jan 2012 20:19:57 GMT
wildrover220 says:
You might like Highland Hermit by James Carron. It is the true life story of James McRory Smith who lived as a recluse for over 30 years at Strathchailleach, a remote bothy in the far north of Scotland. Surviving without mains water, power or phone, he lived off the land, enduring hostile conditions and the remote landscape in one of the most beautiful parts of the British Isles.

Posted on 3 Mar 2011 19:27:51 GMT
Aussie J says:
I liked this...
No Time to Cry Tales of a Leicester Bouncer

Posted on 3 Mar 2011 21:09:36 GMT
You might like Prisoner Without A Crime
Jack Jennings was born in 1919. At the outbreak of the Second World War, he was called up to join the Amy. He was sent to the Far East and in 1942 was captured at Singapore. He was a prisoner of the Japanese for three and a half years during which time he was forced to work on the notorious Death Railway in Thailand. This Memoir tells Jack's story in his own words.

Posted on 4 Mar 2011 09:44:57 GMT
Angel Just-Rights

Posted on 4 Mar 2011 18:39:04 GMT
Last edited by the author on 24 May 2011 03:27:27 BDT
1923: A Memoir: Lies and Testaments 84p

It's a personal as well as a social history. Smith has the knack of bringing the times to life in a way that few writers can manage. It's the ability to tell a story, the knowledge of when to move on & not labour a point.
--The Bookbag

1923 is a book that succeeds in two ways with ease, both as a personal memoir of a life lived in a volatile age and as a record of that age for all time. --The Current Reader

"1923" is uplifting and highly recommended. --Midwest Book Review

1923: A Memoir is a protest against social injustice, corruption, war, famine, poverty, and societies blinded by greed. More importantly, it is the story of hope and the notion that anything can be overcome if desired. --The Publishing Guru

To say that Harry Smith was born under an unlucky star would be an understatement. Born in England in 1923, Smith chronicles the tragic story of his early life in this first volume of his memoirs. He presents his family's early history-their misfortunes and their experiences of enduring betrayal, inhumane poverty, infidelity, and abandonment.

1923: A Memoir presents the story of a life lyrically described, capturing a time both before and during World War II when personal survival was dependent upon luck and guile. During this time, failure insured either a trip to the workhouse or burial in a common grave. Brutally honest, Smith's story plummets to the depths of tragedy and flies up to the summit of mirth and wonder, portraying real people in an uncompromising, unflinching voice.

1923: A Memoir tells of a time and place when life, full of raw emotion, was never so real.

Posted on 5 Mar 2011 15:26:52 GMT
Last edited by the author on 5 Mar 2011 15:29:16 GMT
Jenny says:
I have enjoyed the following two books recently:

Dropped In It by Colin Hall (memoirs of a Cotswolds boy, Arnhem veteran, POW and wallpaper shop owner)
and
A Boy from Nowhere: v. 1 by David Mitchell (memoirs of an East End boy and confectionary trade businessman)

Posted on 13 Mar 2011 16:48:46 GMT
I implore you to read "laugh i thought i'd die" by Jason Brookes. It is without the best biography i have read by a normal person. Well as the author actually writes, "normal" well you decide. Throughout the book i laughed till i cried & at times cried till i laughed. A real addictive page turner that i completely recommend to one & all over the age of 16.

Posted on 19 Mar 2011 13:19:02 GMT
Brendan, I was very interested to read the description of your book, as my father-in-law has written a book about his own experiences at the exact same time, Glasgow in the 50s and 60s. He was the very "tally man" mentioned in your description, selling goods door to door on credit. He also mentions the "bookie and his runner" in his own book, and the fact that he was frequently mistaken for a copper. I have published it for him here on Amazon - this is the blurb:

Often amusing, laugh out loud funny in parts, sometimes thought-provoking, and occasionally tear jerking, "Can You Come Back Next Week?" is an account of one young collector/salesman's exploits and adventures selling goods on credit door to door in the poorer areas of Glasgow in the 50s and 60s. If you lived through those times, you will find memories galore in these words, and for those who did not, it proves an evocative glimpse into a time past, where a radiogram which loaded ten records at once was the height of luxury, to be paid for scrupulously week on week, even though your kids ran around in vests and bare bums. Set upon by a sword-wielding maniac, dangled from a twenty-first storey balcony, and being offered it "on a plate" in lieu of payment - life in the Credit Trade was certainly never dull!

Can You Come Back Next Week?

Posted on 19 Mar 2011 14:53:11 GMT
Last edited by the author on 19 Mar 2011 15:01:10 GMT
From one of the reviewers in Amazon USA: "In the middle of hundreds of biographies of "celebrities" that owe their careers to a lucky break it is refreshing to read the biography of somebody whose life is truly inspiring and deserving of admiration. Also it is rare to read a biographical book that is hard to put down because an almost magical combination of a great story and outstanding writing.

Although I suspect that women, particularly young women, will find this book specially motivating, as a middle-aged men I totally enjoyed being transported to the old Korea and feeling, like I was witnessing first person, the triumph of hard work and determination of a little girl that overcame the most crushing adversity to become a Martial Arts Master. I highly recommend "The Iron Butterfly: Memoir of a Martial Arts Master. The True Story of a Mermaid's Daughter." "The Iron Butterfly: Memoir of a Martial Arts Master: The True Story of a Mermaid's Daughter

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Mar 2011 15:21:17 GMT
Many thanks for letting me know about "Can You Come Back Next Week?", Robsia. I run a short story website for Scottish-connected people called McStorytellers, which you'll find at http://mcstorytellers.weebly.com. If you or your father-in-law were to submit a story to the site, perhaps something drawn from the book, I'd be able to provide the book with a bit more free publicity. See what you think. No catches. Just us Scots helping each other.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Mar 2011 00:00:25 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Mar 2011 00:02:05 GMT
agreed - must-read this biography about an ordinary person:
Angel Just-Rights

Posted on 22 Mar 2011 15:56:33 GMT
Conrad Jones says:
Try Undisputed the story of a Welsh dairy farmer who at just 5ft 2" became a 3 times undisputed World champion against all the odds. Not just a story about a fighter but the story of his battle to keep the farm going through the farming crisis of the 90's whilst training himself for top class fights, teaching students six days a week, and watching his father suffer and lose his fight against MS.

Posted on 24 Mar 2011 17:56:46 GMT
This is just a collection of a few short nostalgia pieces (amongst others) that will hopefully make you smile and might even make you laugh out loud! Steady Past Your Granny's

Posted on 27 Mar 2011 22:30:57 BDT
Last edited by the author on 27 Mar 2011 22:32:28 BDT
Lisa WB says:
A Fine Line A Balance to Survive

This is a true story and about an ordinary person!

Posted on 2 Apr 2011 02:30:07 BDT
E. Walker says:
I've written a kindle book about the ordinary-but-extraordinary experience of being a new mother Baby Diary: The Story of Charlotte Hope

Posted on 2 Apr 2011 11:10:20 BDT
Rosinante says:
A really interesting creative non-fiction/biography. Read "Threads" by Rose O'Flynn. It tells of the triumph of the human spirit as one ordinary family lives through WW1, The Russian Revolution, WW2 and Stalin's gulags with courage and tenacity. Little known daily details of life in these times.

Posted on 6 Apr 2011 17:10:49 BDT
Damaged Goods, by Julian Wolfendale is the beautifully written true story of one little boy's journey along a fractured path to adulthood, accompanied by the music and people that filled his life.

Charting his course in words and pictures, from adoption and a respectable childhood that wasn't really his, we journey with the author through years of teenage rebellion, heartbreak and broken dreams, through the Punk movement and beyond. Through some bad choices, including an attraction to drugs and trouble, we watch as his life continues to unfold and unravel through marriage, fatherhood and divorce.

At 30 years old, in a search for answers, he traces his natural parents and finally his lifelong love of music and the wilder side of life makes sense as he discovers that his natural father is the legendary 60's rock singer Arthur Brown, the God of Hell Fire.

Through their burgeoning friendship, some parts of the puzzle fall into place though others are lost forever and the author finally decides to find his own way of living peacefully and happily, in spite of it all.

This story takes you on a musical trip that will make you laugh and cry and be very glad that it wasn't yours. It is also a reminder of the fact that that elusive thing we call happiness is within our reach and that, in the end, we are all responsible for our own destiny.

Damaged Goods

Posted on 8 Apr 2011 14:26:34 BDT
How does one attract the first reader?

Posted on 11 Apr 2011 00:52:06 BDT
Carol Ryan says:
Right Now Is Perfect: A Romance, An Adventure, The Unexpected Thereafter
This book is for everyone who dreams of finding a soul mate, ditching a job, and sailing off into the sunset-or for those more practical types who'd rather just read about it!
A woman falls in love with a charismatic free spirit. When he invites her to realize a lifelong dream of sailing across the Pacific, she heeds the call of romance, throws caution to the wind and leaves her well-established career behind. The story of an imperfect romance on a crowded sailboat unfolds as the four-person crew sails among the beautiful, isolated islands of the South Pacific.
The Marquesas, Tuamotos, and Society Islands of French Polynesia, the Cook Islands, American Samoa, Samoa, Fiji and New Zealand are the landfalls you'll discover along the way.
But that's not all! The story moves to the west coast of America and Mexico as the two sailors re-adjust to life on land. Will their love affair survive? Just when it seems it might, an unexpected development throws everything into question.

Posted on 12 Apr 2011 17:37:53 BDT
Travelman says:
If you like reading memoirs about ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances then try my Kindle book about the beginning of the Biafran war. Amazon have reduced it from £3.45 to £2.75.
The Up-Country Man A personal account of the first one hundred days inside secessionist Biafra.
learn more http://africantales.wordpress.com

Posted on 12 Apr 2011 18:47:40 BDT
Aussie J says:
Try this:
No Time to Cry Tales of a Leicester Bouncer

Reader feedback: "Well Jeff, I've finished the book and I can honestly say I found it hard to put down. It is an interesting insight to your personality along with some others. It reminded me of things and people that had long been forgotten and made me smile, also sometimes a little sad. I do miss those days and nights".

Posted on 13 Apr 2011 17:55:15 BDT
Last edited by the author on 28 Apr 2011 14:19:11 BDT
1923: A Memoir 83p on Kindle
It's a personal as well as a social history. Smith has the knack of bringing the times to life in a way that few writers can manage. It's the ability to tell a story, the knowledge of when to move on & not labour a point.
--The Bookbag

1923 is a book that succeeds in two ways with ease, both as a personal memoir of a life lived in a volatile age and as a record of that age for all time. --The Current Reader

"1923" is uplifting and highly recommended. --Midwest Book Review

1923: A Memoir is a protest against social injustice, corruption, war, famine, poverty, and societies blinded by greed. More importantly, it is the story of hope and the notion that anything can be overcome if desired. --The Publishing Guru

Chapter One
The Beginning
When I was born on a cold, damp day in February 1923, we were not a happy family. We were not a well-fed family when I first cried out for my mother's breast. Nor were we a loving family when I fell asleep for the first time in my crib, beside my parents' bed. On the day of my birth, my father was not glad-handed by his friends for siring a male. When I came into this world, he was already an old man in his late fifties. If my father had any friends, they would have been elderly and unimpressed at his impecunious virility. As for my mother, she was a much younger woman. She was in her twenties, jaded by marrying both above and beneath her station. My arrival was one more proof to her that she was trapped in a marriage that had long ago lost its luster. My mother was being asphyxiated by the cliché: too little, too late.

Posted on 13 Apr 2011 17:56:03 BDT
Hi I recently read a review in womans magazine about a book that a social worker had written about her time in social work but can't recall the name of the book - Can any one help with the title please?
Thanks
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Participants:  112
Total posts:  158
Initial post:  2 Mar 2011
Latest post:  29 Jul 2012

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