3 used & new from £11.95

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.89

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida [VINYL]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida [VINYL]


Available from these sellers.
2 new from £32.33 1 used from £11.95

Amazon Has Certified That This Packaging Is Frustration-Free
This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.
Amazon Has Certified That This Packaging Is Frustration-Free
This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.

Amazon's Iron Butterfly Store

Music

Image of album by Iron Butterfly

Photos

Image of Iron Butterfly
Visit Amazon's Iron Butterfly Store
for 16 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (22 Oct. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: IMPORT
  • ASIN: B001Q8FT7Y
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 355,806 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

With its endless, droning minor-key riff and mumbled vocals, "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" is arguably the most notorious song of the acid rock era. According to legend, the group was so stoned when they recorded the track that they could neither pronounce the title "In the Garden of Eden" or end the track, so it rambles on for a full 17 minutes, which to some listeners sounds like eternity. But that's the essence of its appeal -- it's the epitome of heavy psychedelic excess, encapsulating the most indulgent tendencies of the era. Iron Butterfly never matched the warped excesses of "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida," either on their debut album of the same name or the rest of their catalog, yet they occasionally made some enjoyable fuzz guitar-driven psychedelia that works as a period piece. The five tracks that share space with their magnum opus on In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida qualify as good artifacts, and the entire record still stands as the group's definitive album, especially since this is the only place the full-length title track is available

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Geoffrey Saunders on 25 Nov. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Iron Butterfly reincarnated themselves with the addition of Lee Dorman and Erik Brann in 1967 and earned their place in the Hall Of Fame with the 17:05 title track of this album, a slow-descending C-based blues riff that also featured one of rock music's most famous drum solos (though I dig the "laughing" guitar in it as well) that took up the whole of the old side two. Side one is also more than worth a listen including one of the 60's forgotten happy sounds Most Anything That You Want, with its fantastic wandering bassline, and the heavy urgent My Mirage. Great sounds from these South California hippies.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By nicjaytee on 12 Mar. 2004
Format: Audio CD
If you're here and you know the album then you'll know why, despite the bombastic singing, the trite lyrics and derivative instrumental work-outs, you love it... the unbelievably effective 17 minutes of its title cut that, at the time and over 30 years later, somehow just "works", brilliantly. If you're here and you don't, buy it for this track alone and revel in some of the best and most evocative music from the late 60's "West Coast" scene.
And, in amongst it all, check out the drum solo. "De rigour" for its time but clever because it's not at all "flashy" and, in fact, not particularly good technically, but because it sits there as an essential element in building the "atmosphere" on which the success of the track relies. Not your usual "give the guy his three minute spot to show what he can do" but rather, by design or chance, an extremely rare example of how to make a drum solo an integral & welcome part of a piece of quite stunning rock music.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Dec. 2002
Format: Audio CD
When my father was stationed in Japan at the end of the Sixties we only had Armed Forces Radio to listen to and one weekend they did the top 100 songs of all time ("Satisfaction" was picked #1). But for many of us the big treat came early in the countdown when they played the legendary "long" version of "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida." The funny thing about owning this CD is that I have heard the first couple of seconds of the five songs before the title track for the first time since I bought the record and listened to the first side exactly ONE TIME (and I know I am not alone in that). There are certainly hard rock classics with compelling guitar riffs and driving drum beats that you have to own and "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" is on the short list, along with "Sunshine of Your Love" and "Whole Lotta Love," and the bottom line is that the only way of having this song is to have this CD. It does not matter than you cannot name any other song on the album let alone the names of any of the members of the band (I do seem to remember several were self-described "nomads"). You are never going to find this song on a hit collection. In fact, I do not think I have ever seen one with the "short" version of this song. But at least once a year you have to take this one out and listen to the whole 17 minutes and five seconds because you have to know your rock and roll roots.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By airmanchairman on 24 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
Many may remember the iconic riff of "Inna Gadda Da Vida" from the flower-power days of psychedelic rock, but some of us, some of us recall the whole Iron Butterfly caboodle without even needing to play our old vinyl or cassette copies of the music - such was the power and influence of the "new wave" of progressive rock that it seemed to weld itself into the memory of true believers and become a living mantra that raised the consciousness and outlook to nowadays' "Polyphonic Spree"-like levels...

I grew up in West Africa, after the first 5 years of my life were spent in the UK (where I now live again), so my abiding memories of the music of the late 60s and 70s are in an environment of blue skies, green seas and cool breeze, beach parties and star-filled African Skies... as an IB lyric goes "when we were but children fair, those were the best years of our lives"

The music impressed me enough to remember their names without consulting Google: Doug Ingle's trippy organ, Lee Dorman's heavy-handed bass, Ron Bushy's elephantine drumming and guitarist Keith Brann (who sadly passed away a few years ago) was a 17-year old wonder-kid from whom (along with Neal Schon of Journey) great things were expected.

One of my favourite progressive rock albums of all time (behind only the likes of Hendrix's Axis Bold as Love and Electric Ladyland, Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon and Led Zeppelin 2) is Metamorphosis, in which Brann had been replaced by the guitarists Mike Pinera and Rhino Reinhardt. "Butterfly Bleu" is an abiding memory of smooching a favourite "hippy chick" in my arms one moment, then us both boogying and thrashing wildly moments later. Ahh, "God Bless you, God", those were the days...

Thanks for the memories guys, wherever you are.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 July 2000
Format: Audio CD
watch the film Manhunter for an outstanding piece of Iron Butterfly! as the film draws to its conclusion the director fits in-a-gadda-da-vida into the films gruesome ending.I heard this album in the early seventies and was really pleased that it came back to me via this brilliant film. Get the album, side one is just as good as two, though in-a-gadda-da-vida at 17 minutes+ is the piece de resistence!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By mutt on 1 Aug. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
What a great band. Great songs and musical talent. I got this album on vinyl !!!!!!! years ago and said I would always add it to the cd collection. So hear it is on my cd shelf next to all the other classic rock albums. Its worth buying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback