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Peak: How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow Audio CD – Audiobook, CD

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Product details

  • Audio CD: 7 pages
  • Publisher: Gildan Media Corporation; Unabridged edition (1 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596592184
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596592186
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 3.2 x 15.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,436,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Despite using the word "mojo" in the subtitle and citing inspiration he received from 1960s counterculture icon Timothy Leary, this guide to better management isn′t for hippies. Yes, Conley started the California boutique hotel chain Joie de Vivre Hospitality with the Phoenix Hotel, once a haven for faded rock stars. And yes, he quotes liberally from "rebel" CEOs who surf. But Conley′s book is packed with thoughtful, instructional stories and advice for entrepreneurs as well as Fortune 500 managers, gleaned from his own experience as well as other business books. At the center of this confessional how–to is psychologist Abraham Maslow′s hierarchy of needs, a pyramid that ranks human needs from base to self–actualizing. Used as the basis for employee, customer and stakeholder satisfaction, Conley contends, it can transform a business and its people. Though Stephen Covey and Peter Drucker have looked to Maslow before, Conley describes how using the pyramid saved his company from bankruptcy when the dot–com bubble burst. Conley is most successful when he expresses his ideas in numbered lists rather than the wordy passages that slow down the beginning. On the whole, though, his advice is inspiring and accessible. (Sept.) ( Publishers Weekly, July 23, 2007)

"...book is packed with thoughtful, instructional stories and advice for entrepreneurs as well as Fortune 500 managers...inspiring and accessible." ( Publishers Weekly, July 23, 2007) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Chip Conley gives a brilliant analysis of the absolute necessity of Maslow′s hierarchical paradigm in unleashing the talent and commitment of customers, employees, owners in fact, stakeholders. Great resource material for leaders, trainers, educators, even parents. Chip practices in his hotels what he teaches most successfully!"
Stephen R. Covey, author, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness

"Chip Conley presents a creative and thought–provoking new approach to running a business. He brilliantly applies Abraham Maslow′s theories to management and provides insightful prescriptions that will help you gain peak performance in your company. Conley′s depth and candor make this book a must–read for everyone who wants to improve their organization."
Bill George, former CEO, Medtronic and author, Authentic Leadership and True North

"One of the best business books I′ve read. A unique combination of organized intelligence and creative insight. I guarantee it!"
George Zimmer, CEO and chairman, Men′s Wearhouse, Inc.

"Strategy? Got one. Tactics? Check. But there′s one more key element without which you won′t get anywhere: Motivation. Peak will show you how to create motivated employees, customers, and investors, and tells the story of how one spectacular entrepreneur does it by treating people right and how they return the favor."
Chris Anderson, editor–in–chief, Wired magazine and author, The Long Tail

"Chip Conley′s book is a perfect combination: part personal story, part business theory, and part how–to instruction. Peak combines head, heart, and soul for today′s aspiring business leader. Don′t just read this book do it!"
Alan M. Webber, former editorial director, Harvard Business Review and co–founding editor, Fast Company

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Jan. 2008
Format: Hardcover
Many people who try to do good while doing well think in terms of Abraham H. Maslow's famous hierarchy of needs (proceeding from physiological needs like for food and water to safety needs to relationship needs to esteem needs and finally to self-actualization -- living as one wants to be). The basis for thinkers like David Wolfe, Raj Sisodia, and Jagdish Sheth in Firms of Endearment shares that perspective.

Chip Conley takes that familiar perspective into new territory by describing how he applied the concept to employee, customer, and investor needs in building his Joie de Vivre, his boutique hotel management company. Employees get money, recognition, and meaning from their work. Customers receive what they expect, have their desires fulfilled, and are pampered by gaining what they don't recognize they want. Investors engage in a relationship that's established in the right way, enjoy a positive relationship with those who run the company, and help establish a legacy through their investment. By putting all three hierarchies in place, you can create a unique corporate culture, develop an enthusiastic set of employees and managers, build customer loyalty, and maintain a profitable business.

This way of describing the book makes it seem very academic, but that's not true. Mr. Conley is a hands-on manager who loves nothing better to develop boutique hotels that nicely fit a small psychological segment of mostly affluent travelers. He uses specialty magazines to identify his targets.

The book is as much about how he arrived at this set of conclusions as what the conclusions are. While Silicon Valley was booming, his San Francisco-area hotels were doing great. But when the dot-com bust hit, these hotels suffered along with the rest of the market.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John M Fisher on 11 Nov. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I use Maslow's hierarchy of needs a lot in my training and development work - mainly because it works!, people can see, recognise and understand it. What Chip Conley has done though is take Maslow to another level and extended it's versatility and impact by giving us three versions of the hierarchy - that for the employee, customer and investor. if you want to get some more ways to implement the basic principles of motivation and persuasion then this book will give you some!

The simplified employee version of the triangle gives us "money", "recognition" and "meaning" and expands on each,setting them in a wider context based on the authors own experience. Whilst the cultural implications of some of the examples and anecdotes, being American, will be lost to a non US audience the underlying strength of the theory is all there.

There is a nice questionnaire at the end looking at how the individual perceives their role - as either a "job", a "career" or a "calling" that I've already very successfully trialled with a couple of dozen first line leaders in a manufacturing environment.

The book works!, what more can I say
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Format: Hardcover
As Chip Conley explains in the Preface, "This book is about the miracle of human potential: employees living up to their full potential in the workplace, customers feeling the potential bliss associated with having their unrecognized needs met, and investors feeling fulfilled by seeing the potential of their capital leveraged." I agree with him that all great leaders know how to tap into this "potential" and actualize it into reality." Moreover, I also agree with Conley that great leadership can - and should - be found at all levels and in all areas of an organization. So, what motivations do people need to achieve peak performance, especially in collaboration with others? In this volume, Conley responds to that question, suggesting that there are many valuable lessons to be learned from Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs." For present purposes, it can be abbreviated as follows:

Survival
Security
Self-Actualization

With regard to the first two, I am reminded of a time when Ralph Waldo Emerson delivered a lecture on transcendentalism in Concord (MA) and then agreed to answer questions. A farmer stood up: "Mr. Emerson, how do you transcend an empty stomach?"

Maslow believed that the hierarchy of human needs is best understood when viewed as a triangle, with basic needs (food, shelter, clothing, etc.) at the base. As those needs are at least partially fulfilled, we ascend the pyramid to higher needs (e.g. security, stability, social connections, affiliations), fulfilling them along the way. As Conley explains, "At the top of the pyramid is self-actualization, a place where people have transient moments called `peak experiences'...A peak experience -- comparable to being `in the zone' or in the `flow' - is when ought to be just is.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Much like Chip Conley I love Maslow, indeed quoting Maslow at an interview once got me the job (well the HR guy liked it). I first found the book after watching a TED Lecture by Chip and was moved to buy the book.

I have found the book has reinforced many of my own personal thoughts and ideas with Chip moulding Maslow's Hierarchy into a readily usable everyday business formula. I have given 4 stars as I believe it is a great idea and Chip has great story. On a personal level however I would only give 3 stars, yet would struggle for a reason. While Chip is obviously passionate about his business and the success this formula has given him, it has just not transferred to me; the message has not jumped out the pages at me as it did with the lecture.

In his lecture he shows a picture of one of his employees, Vivian a hotel maid, yet in the book there appears to be a failure to directly connect how his principles are enacted by people like Vivian, there seems to a lack of tangibility in the book.

Great principle, great strategic idea, great story, and love the directed end of chapter bibliographies, just missing that Je ne sais pas...
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