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The War We Never Fought Hardcover – 27 Sep 2012

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Continuum; 1st ed edition (27 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441173315
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441173317
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 3 x 22.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 98,354 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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About the Author

Peter Hitchens is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. He witnessed most of the final scenes of the Cold War, and was a resident correspondent in the Soviet capital and in Washington, DC. He frequently revisits both Russia and the USA. He currently writes for the Mail on Sunday, where he is a columnist and occasional foreign correspondent, reporting most recently from Iran, North Korea, Burma, The Congo and China. He won the journalism category in the 2010 George Orwell Prize for this correspondence.

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 27 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
There will always be some humans who say they have ‘the right’ to take drugs. Perhaps they do. Perhaps they don’t. Which is it? One thing is certain, when a person claims ‘It’s my body, I can do what I like with it,’ there is a flaw in their reasoning.

Does the argument change when a person believes that they do not ‘have’ a body, rather they ‘are’ a body? Listening to some, it is clear the belief in the illusive ‘I’ is alive and well, and why not? The foregoing, when considered at length, can bring a chilly realisation…

One can see, straightaway, there will be (or should be) several other persons involved in our lives who would wish it that we take care of the body we have or are. My aunt is rapidly dying from lung-cancer and I would prefer that not to be the case.

If drug-taking is wrong, what makes it wrong? This is easier to answer if the drugs taken are illegal. One could find sanctuary within the walls of the law. But that’s far too easy, and dangerous. Who wants to be left holding the logic which states if something is legal it is morally right? Not me, thank you. Then again, who wants to argue drinking caffeine is morally wrong?

I am happy to be corrected here, though I remember reading that, on a chemical level, nicotine breaks down caffeine and a person recently free from cigarettes should also cut their coffee intake because without nicotine, the caffeine has a greater affect on their brains.

The affect might be greater irritability, insomnia or restless sleep – the affects of caffeine are well known, yet their affects are not considered a moral problem. Why not?
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 31 Oct. 2014
Format: Hardcover
At the beginning of the year, one night where I was spending time browsing and watching youtube videos; one clip caught my eye. Matthew Perry, of Friends fame debating drugs on newsnight. Being a fan of friends (well used to be) I was intrigued, and watched with interest the debate on drugs. Opposite Perry debating was a stern looking man who seemed somewhat familiar though at the time couldn’t think from where exactly, I watched the news infrequently so couldn’t place but was sure I’d seen him somewhere, but as it turned out this man was Peter Hitchens. As the debate went on I found myself agreeing more with Peter as to me it seemed he had the stronger argument of deterrence and free will etc, but he also stated one thing which I found surreal and unbelievable as I have never ever heard anyone say or advocate such a concept.

Stating to Perry (and Baroness Meacher) he says “You people believe in this fantasy of addiction in which people lose all power over themselves and become victims of this terrible and frightening disease and after which they cannot stop taking drugs”

Now I have always considered addiction as a matter of fact, ie you know there are drug addicts, gambling addicts, alcoholics etc, its just an every day notion that is such a common theme ingrained in life, that to hear someone say its just a myth was a truly astonishing thing. I could have easily dismissed him as some kind of crackpot, but because I agreed with the bulk of what he was saying, It made me actually think more deeply about the concept of addiction and drugs etc.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Ben on 5 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'll try and keep this review brief and concise as possible
PROS
- Reasonable case for being cautious in regards to legalising cannabis
- Convincing account that cannabis has been de facto decriminalised in the UK
- Nice prose in places, well written
CONS
- No comparative study, no other countries mentioned, this makes it very difficult to validate a lot of the conclusion he draws
- Poor arguments surrounding the concept of addiction
- Poor sourcing in places - unclear at times where the information came from
- Many logical fallacies committed in his arguments, particularity with correlation and causation
- Cherry picks stories and small pieces of evidence
- Provides a one dimensional solution to the problem with little evidence to show it would actually be effective
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40 of 57 people found the following review helpful By L. Bailey on 15 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover
Before reading this book I had more of a libertarian attitude about drugs, especially cannabis, and didn't expect this to change. I knew Hitchens was no stranger to logical argument after reading his excellent book, "The Rage Against God," but I had yet to hear a good case for stronger laws against drugs.

After reading "The War We Never Fought," I have to admit I've changed my view. Hitchens is clearly a very intelligent man who despises drugs not because of Puritanical instinct (as some have accused him of) but because he's studied their effects on society. His writing style is very readable yet not condescending- this is a man who knows how to employ the pen.

I'm not going to try to lay out all his arguments here, but I would strongly recommend this book to anyone looking to gain more knowledge of the drugs debate.
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