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Is It Cowardly To Pray For Rain?: The Ashes Online Chronicle: The Online Ashes Chronicle of a Nation's Office-Bound Nervousness (Guardian) Paperback – 17 Oct 2005


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Is It Cowardly To Pray For Rain?: The Ashes Online Chronicle: The Online Ashes Chronicle of a Nation's Office-Bound Nervousness (Guardian) + 766 and All That: Over by Triumphant Over - How England Won the Ashes
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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus (17 Oct. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034911983X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349119830
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 860,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"I think I was saying 3-0 or 4-0 about 12 months ago, thinking there might be a bit of rain around. But with the weather as it is at the moment, I have to say 5-0." Glenn McGrath

Book Description

An online Ashes chronicle of a nation's office-bound nervousness

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Oct. 2005
Format: Paperback
The Guardian are getting in on the Ashes bandwagon, but in a unique and worthwhile way.
The book will be appreciated by Over-By-Over fan's. Do note though, this is a straight cut-and-paste job from the archive so there is nothing new, and the typo's remain. But its still a great laugh, and will appeal to the cult following for the Guardian's (often mimicked, rarely bettered) commentary.
If you missed the Guardian's OBO, but got hooked on the Ashes, you should also buy this book. The OBO format involves a written summary of what happened in each over (think humourous pub/armchair version of events rather than Boycott or Atherton) mixed with input from members of the public who have e-mailed the journalists with facts, questions, current worries. You can therefore relive the whole summer whilst giggling, and learn some new facts. Plus, whilst Flintoff et al are giving their accounts in various expensive books, this is a really good version of events from the fans point of view. It records office culture in the summer of 2005 and what we expect as England supporters (i.e. like Asterix, that the sky will fall on our head any second) - you'll be able to empathise with so much of it.
But, and this is the only reason I gave the book 4 stars, I think the Guardian missed a chance in not putting some pictures in to accompany key overs, key events, and key themes in the book. It's not like a newspaper doesn't have access to sports photography. Maybe the Guardian should try a Christmas release "coffee table" version with snaps?
I really recommend the book as something different amongst the plethora of Ashes publications - as such, I believe you couldn't fail if you bought it as a gift for someone you know who likes cricket. It should win the Guardian OBO commentaries new fans as well. Photo's though would have put the cherry on the cake.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Oct. 2005
Format: Paperback
I don't know what I'd have done without Guardian Unlimited this summer. Their over by over coverage of the game pioneered a format that all the papers seem to be nicking now, but the original remains by far the best. Office workers all over the land, shackled to their desks and far from the nearest tv screen, relied on their updates to see them through the day. Some of them nearly got fired for it. And more than just bringing the wickets and the sledging as it happened, the commentary is a work of genius in itself. Other sites might have told you it was overcast but no sign of rain, but where else would you read that skies were "John Major grey and about as threatening as meeting the former PM in a dark alley?" (Sean Ingle).
Hilarious even months after the events it describes.
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By John D. Muir on 23 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a long conversation between people who don't know each other, but share a common passion. We hear about what they're doing, family issues, hopes, fears and dreams, all set against the ongoing backdrop of a 5-match test series. It helps that the series was one of the most exciting ever played and so emotions ran high, as the title indicates.

Reading it brought back great memories of that Summer of 2005. In a way, this book is more vivid just because it isn't wonderful writing. It's ordinary people making jokes, having fun, but underneath waiting anxiously to hear the news, good or bad, about the team they support. Because of the length of a test match, this is possible only in cricket and it's one of the things that sets the sport apart.

Thanks to the Guardian for having the idea to issue this- it's not an obvious subject for a book, but one much appreciated by me and thousands of other cricket lovers.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Clifton on 3 Nov. 2005
Format: Paperback
For those who have never experienced the joy of the Guardian OBO coverage, this is a great introduction - minus the teeth-gratingly tense atmosphere of the last Ashes series. For those of us who have been reading the OBOs for the last few years, it is a chance to relive all the favourite riffs (Rob Smyth's OC references, Rob Smyth's hangovers, the innings killer that was Mike Adamson's coverage etc) - minus the teeth-gratingly etc etc. Add it to your commemorative Ashes collection today...
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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
This is not a simple cut and paste job, some entries have been edited.
Overall, this is disappointing. You know what happens so the suspense has gone and the style of writing that suits the sneaky peek whilst at the desk does not easily lend itself to reading in a longer sitting. The weekends are rubbish.
Good, but not as good as I remembered it.
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