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Babi Yar. A document in the form of a novel ... Translated by David Floyd Unknown Binding – 1970

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Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B0014JTNAO
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Inquisio on 1 Jan. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A truly harrowing tale of the atrocities meted out by the Nazi's as they rampaged through the Russia's. A really bitter story of one boys existance amidst all the turmoil and degradation of a little known area in Kiev known as Babi Yar, a ravine where ethnic peoples were brutally executed for just purely existing.
Written crudely at the time by the boy, whose mother told him to get the story out into the world, and this is that book. Published in the 1960's, after all manner of cuts, exclusions and political meddling. I had bought a paperback copy some years earlier, but, a good percentage was missing, so, I spent a while trying to secure another, full copy. This, although secondhand, is worth the money spent. It should be in print today and rank alongside the Primo Levis books...
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Marilyn Z. Tomlins on 3 May 2014
Format: Paperback
I first read Anatoly Kuznetsov's 'Babi Yar' in April 1990. I bought the 5th Dell Publishing Edition which was published in November 1969. Because of the situation in Russia and its former allied satellite states of Ukraine and Crimea, I decided to read Kuznetsov's book again.

Kuznetsov begins his book with a notification which had been issued by the Soviet Information Bureau. It read: 'Evening Communiqué September, 21 1941. Throughout September 21 our troops fought the enemy along the entire front.After fierce fighting lasting many days, our troops have left Kiev'.

The story that Kuznetsov tells us is horrendous. Sadly, it is not unique, because wherever Hitler's Nazis went, they acted just as they did in the Ukraine and there in Kiev and at the ravine named Babi Yar.

Of the 175,000 Jews who lived in Kiev in the 48 hours which preceded the city's fall to Nazi Germany, an estimated 130,000 died being shot or beaten to death at the hands of the occupying Germans and at those of Ukrainian 'polizei'. The word of course means police, but as Leo Gruliow, Editor of 'The Current Digest of the Soviet Press' explains to us in his note written in New York in January 1967, polizei was what the Ukranians called Ukrainians who had become police under and for the Germans. Sadly (again I use this word) they were as cruel to their fellow Ukrainians as were the Germans: indeed like the Capos of Hitler's concentration and death camp's. (The Capos were fellow camp internees, some of them Jews, who had been made guards.)

Who went to the aid of the suffering Ukranians? Russian soldiers. This was in 1943. The Germans, defeated and on the run, and the Soviet Ilyushin bombers overhead, some 200,000 Ukrainians in and around Kiev lay dead.
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