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A cupful of tears: Sixteen Victorian novelettes Hardcover – 1 Jan 1965


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Hardcover, 1 Jan 1965
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wolfe Publishing; First Thus edition (1965)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0000CMQNH
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,445,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By heretic666 TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Feb 2013
If you can get past the title you are in for an odd expereince. Buckets of bathos, plots so thin a pantomime audience would grow bored and attempts at heart wrenching as subtle as open heart surgery with a chainsaw.
Perfect for an overly sensitive or emo teenager who thinks the world is a cruel cold place
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This is mainly worth getting because it contains the whole of Amanda McKittrick Ros's "Irene Iddesleigh", and is indeed the only way of getting that work at a reasonable price, as all of her novels in their original editions are now highly prized collectors' items.

This may seem odd, given her trademark convoluted sentences, appalling mixed metaphors and over-the-top melodramatic plots, which read like a parody of the worst would-be-profound late Victorian literature of the Marie Corelli type. She has in fact been voted the worst fiction writer of all time; all the more so because she obviously valued both the quality and the significance of her works very highly. Perhaps the best (or do I mean worst) example is her preface to Delina Delaney, in which she ripostes to "the so-called Barry Pain"'s hatchet job on Irene Iddesleigh, described by him as "the book of the century".

The explanation is that her works have acquired cult value because of their unintentional power of amusement, rather like McGonagal: they're so bad that they're good. This cult was largely originated by C. S. Lewis, who used to read the books aloud with his friends to see how long they could last without bursting out laughing. The works have also been solemnly reviewed by Aldous Huxley, who compared them to the Euphuist movement in Elizabethan literature.
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