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Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol.2 Hardcover – 3 Mar 2011

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241953405
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241953402
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.5 x 4.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 67,253 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

It will gladden the heart of all good cooks ...an alchemist's stone which enables any cook to turn base ingredients to gold (Caroline Conran Sunday Times )

As close to a divine text as you can get (Matthew Fort Guardian )

About the Author

Julia Child revolutionised cooking in the US and this was the cookbook that launched her career. A native of California and a Smith College graduate, Julia Child studied at Paris's famous Cordon Bleu, and worked under various distinguished French chefs. In 1951 she started her own cooking school in Paris, L'Ecole des Trois Gourmandes, with Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle and the three women started compiling this cookbook. Mastering the Art of French Cooking was published in 1961 and was an instant hit. Julia Child consequently began appearing on the television series The French Chef, which aired for many years all over the United States, and many more books and TV series ensued.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By M. Schisano on 22 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Volume 1 is a must-have for every cook, volume 2 is also a must-have but it contains more complex, sophisticated recipes, some of which will become favourites and some of which will just always require a little bit too much time, too much effort, too many things.
Volume 2 builds on volume 1 and I find the Puff Pastry recipes already on their own worth the book. The instructions and drawings are, like for volume 1, top of the bill.
Volume 2 contains the following sections: 1) Soups of the Garden - Bisques and Soups from the Sea 2)Baking: Breads, Brioches, Croissants and Pastries 3)Meats: From Country kitchen to Haute Cuisine 4)Chickens, Poached and Sauced - and a Coq en Pate 5)Charcuterie: Sausages, Salted Pork and Goose, Pates and Terrines 6)A Choice of Vegetables 7)Desserts: Extending the Repertoire. Bon Appetit!
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Dommy1973 on 3 Mar. 2003
Format: Paperback
I have owned this book for many years (since 1977) and it still remains as one of the finest books on the method of French cooking. It is thorough and easy to understand as long as you read the recipe very carefully and fully before you begin. The recipes themselves are presented so that the reader is introduced to the basic way of preparing and cooking something with variations following on from the master recipe in question. Volume 1 takes the reader through Soups (onion, garlic, vichyssoise being fine and tasty examples), through a fabulous chapter on sauces (white, brown, hollandaise, stocks etc) and moves on to some of the classic dishes for which the French are known (Coq au Vin, Pot-au-Fue). The only criticism I could think of was a slightly dissappointing chapter on fish - they only really mention sole (unsurprisingly perhaps). The puddings are particularly straightforward to follow and quite delicious (cheery clafoutie being particularly so). Some of the recipes do call for a particularly long time in the kitchen - especially for the traditional French loaf for example - but if you have time on your hands or a long weekend ahead, it is well worth the effort immersing yourself in the delights of making (perhaps) a wonderful choucroute a l'Alsacienne and enjoying the beautiful meaty aroma of a dish that takes at least 5 hours to cook.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
Mastering the Art of French Cooking vol 2 is an natural complement to the first volume.
This excellent book - now regarded as a standard by keen amateurs and professional chefs alike - is not produced in the style of the latest 'glossy photo' format. Instead, it uses clear and succinct descriptions of the key techniques you'll need to undertake basic and more complex classic French recipes.
It's a clear and accessible guide. If you're keen on developing your cooking skills further then you should have it on your kitchen book shelf.
At 768 pages in length, it's certainly a comprehensive book, and good value when compared with 'TV Chef' books
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By HadjiMurad on 8 Jan. 2001
Format: Paperback
I was given volume 1 for my 23rd birthday - I finally found volume 2 5 years later! How did the fact that I wanted it stick in my mind for so long? Buy them and you will instantly understand. These are *the* definitive cook books - they are to other cookery books what the "Complete works of Shakespeare" are to drama. They are sometimes complex but oh, so thorough (for example, about 70 pages on the core of French cuisine - sauces, alone!) The recipes are listed step by step, forcing you to read and understand each one (indeed, I recommend reading them like novels, if only just the sections on kitchen equipment and technique!) but they are fantastic. Try, for example, "Sauce Venaison" - it spans a number of pages and evolves from "Brown Sauce" through "Sauce Ragout" to this delicious game sauce (takes about 4 hours to make, but when I tasted it I couldn't believe I had actually made it...!) Forget all those self help books - these will *really* change your life! (Ok, maybe that's a bit OTT but they are good).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie Howard on 17 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book, old fashioned in a brilliant way. Will look forward more to cooking from it when we move to france.
The book is well laid out as easy to follow, it does not have the glossy photos of modern receipy books, but that is what makes it more special.
I have to admit that I looked the books up some months ago after what the film Julie & Julia, which I loved too.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is really an essential addition to Volume 1, covering essential areas such as bread and pastry in detail and providing a lot of information and recipes for meat - including ideas for unusual meats such as tripe and tongue which look worth trying.
I have deducted a star for what appears to be dreadful editing: in the section on French bread it is recommended that quarry tiles be used to fill a baking tray in order to create a stable heated surface to cook your bread on - then it goes on for several pages to discuss what to do with your asbestos sheet. Presumably the original edition recommended asbestos before the dangers were known and someone has just replaced the original reference with a suggestion for quarry tiles without bothering to update the rest of the chapter (and I would have thought slate or a volcanic rock, such as granite or syenite, cut to size, would be better).
The "converted to imperial measurements" 2011 edition that arrived means I now have Vol 1 in US measurements and Vol 2 in Imperial. Hmmm. In practice, it doesn't seem to make much difference because liquid volumes are the only things affected and there don't seem to be many references to pints or fluid ounces in the recipes. I just have to remember that a pint in Vol 1 is 25% less than a pint in Vol 2.
I've still got a lot of reading (and cooking) to do. I just hope the editing in other sections is better than it is in the bread section. In any case, it's still an outstanding cookbook.
PS: It seems the references to asbestos may be because old quarry tiles contained the stuff (and should therefore be avoided, as should modern, glazed ones which may contain lead in the glaze).
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